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2008 

Annual Town Report 




Town of Andover 

Massachusetts 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofto2008ando 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



2008 ANNUAL REPORT 




PREPARED BY THE TOWN MANAGER 

PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 40, 

SECTION 49 OF THE GENERAL LAWS OF THE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS AND 

ARTICLE II, SECTION 4 OF THE GENERAL BY-LAWS OF 

THE TOWN OF ANDOVER 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

ANIMAL INSPECTION 109 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 1 

COMMISSION ON DISABILITY 103 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 60 

BUILDING DIVISION 60 

CONSERVATION DIVISION 62 

ELECTRICAL INSPECTION 61 

HEALTH DIVISION 65 

PLANNING DIVISION 68 

PLUMBING, GAS & SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 61 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 71 

COMMUNITY SERVICES DIVISION 74 

DIRECTORY OF COMMITTEES & BOARDS 11 

DIRECTORY OF DEPARTMENT/DIVISION HEADS 16 

ELDER SERVICES DIVISION 77 

FPWANCE & BUDGET 20 

ASSESSORS 22 

CENTRAL PURCHASING 20 

COLLECTOR/TREASURER 22 

REFORMATION SYSTEMS ....•■ 23 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 119 

FIRE-RESCUE ' 35 

FOUNDERS' DAY 17 

GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL .101 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 108 

HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 209 

HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS 212 

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT 93 



JOHN CORNELL FUEL ASSISTANCE FUND 118 

MARGARET G. TOWLE FUND 118 

MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 57 

PLANT AND FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 41 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE 42 

ELECTRICAL/MECHANICAL 42 

FACILITIES SERVICES 47 

FORESTRY 46 

PARKS & GROUNDS 45 

SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 45 

VEHICLE MAPNTENANCE 47 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 30 

ANIMAL CONTROL 31 

DETECTIVE DIVISION 31 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 32 

OPERATIONS DIVISION 30 

RECORDS DIVISION 31 

PRESERVATION COMMISSION 106 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 50 

ENGPNEERTNG 50 

HIGHWAY 52 

SEWER 54 

SOLID WASTE / RECYCLING 54 

WATER TREATMENT PLANT 52 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 90 

TOWN CLERK 27 

TOWN COUNSEL 89 

TOWN MANAGER 4 

TOWN MEETPNG MINUTES 138 

TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 110 

VETERANS SERVICES 80 

YOUTH SERVICES DIVISION 84 



Town of Andover 

Board of Selectmen 



2008 




2008 Board of Selectmen, from left to right: Gerald Stabile, Jr.; Alex J. Vispoli; 
Brian P. Major; Mary K. Lyman; and Ted E. Teichert, Chairman 



The Town of Andover, more than a place to live, is a way of life. 

Its legacy of democracy shall be preserved. Each citizen should experience the treasures 

of nature, history, individual respect, neighborhood, and learning. As resources and energy 

allow, each of these gifts from the past will be enriched in the present for those yet to be. 

Vision Statement of the Board of Selectmen 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 



Town Offices 
36 Bartlet Street 

Andover, MA 01810 
(978) 623-8200 

» \v\v.ando\ erma.sov 



Dear Andover Citizens: 

It should go without saying that 2008 has not been the best of years and 2009 is not 
looking much better. Our nation is currently in the midst of a major prolonged recession with a 
worldwide reach, the likes of which has not been seen since the Great Depression of the 1930s. 
We are experiencing ever growing levels of unemployment as business of all sizes, from Main 
Street to Wall Street are closing up shop. The severity of this particular recession is almost 
surreal as we watch America's major banks, financial institutions and bedrock industries decline 
towards bankruptcy. 

Although our nation's leading economists are generally in agreement on the causes of 
this recession - irresponsible loan practices, overvalued stocks and housing, people living 
beyond their means, lack of regulatory" oversight, etc.. there is much less consensus on exactly 
what to do about it. Some say Washington needs to bail out the banks and other major financial 
institutions, others say the solution is for the Federal government to deficit spend and infuse a 
trillion or so dollars into the economy to stimulate spending and growth, while others say things 
should be left alone for Free Market dynamics to sort out. Though no one really knows at this 
point which of these approaches will prevail, most of the experts do believe the economy will 
start to rebound in the latter part of 2009 or early 2010 and that our country will be positioned for 
a new era of growth and prosperity. 

We know the prospects for a brighter economic future offers little solace for those who 
have lost their jobs, or their homes, or are struggling to make ends meet. But it is in the valleys 
of life where we come to realize our greatest strengths and learn to appreciate the power of the 
human spirit. To those in Andover who are in a low place right now. please remember that your 
family, your friends, your church and your community are there for you. You are not alone. 

On another sad note. 2008 saw the passing of former Town Manager. Kenneth R. 
Mahony on May 22" . Ken served as Andover" s Town Manager from 1982 to 1990 and was 
responsible for many improvements around Town. A remembrance ceremony was held at the 
Memorial Hall Library to honor his life and long career in public service. 

Active planning efforts are underway for replacing several outdated public facilities - the 
Bancroft Elementary School, the Town Yard and the Ballardvale Fire Station. Although some 
ma}' feel that these large projects should be put on the back burner during the economic 
downturn, the Town must continue to move forward on them because the planning for these 
types of projects can take years to accomplish and we want to be read}" to present them to Town 
Meeting when conditions improve. 



As this report goes to print, the Town is working hard to balance its budget for Fiscal 
Year 2009 which begins on July 1, 2009. Cities and towns across the Commonwealth and across 
the nation are struggling to maintain critical public services with severely reduced revenues as a 
result of the recession. Andover is no different. The Town is looking at a multi-million dollar 
budget deficit for next year with the prospect of dozens of layoffs and reductions in all types of 
services. All of the Town officials, be they elected or appointed, school or municipal, have come 
to realize that we can no longer continue to fund and operate the type of organization many have 
become accustomed to. These times require the Town to take a fresh look at all possibilities for 
cost savings and efficiencies. Some say a crisis is an opportunity not to be wasted. So in that 
vein, we believe that the Town of Andover needs to emerge from this economic downturn as a 
leaner, more efficient organization - one that is structured for the future and not the past. To 
accomplish that outcome, the Town will need to make some difficult decisions and pursue 
opportunities in the areas of regionalizing services with neighboring communities, outsourcing 
and privatizing certain functions, consolidating duties, offices and services and reducing the level 
of some types of services. 

Andover faces many challenges in the years ahead - challenges that will require its 
citizens to come together and engage in the hard work of consensus building. But the fabric of 
our community is strong and resilient. We will meet the challenges head on and Andover will be 
a better place for all. 

Finally, on behalf of the Board of Selectmen, as always, it is our honor to serve you as 
your elected representatives. Please continue to let us know what's on your mind and how we 
may better serve you. 



Respectfully submitted, 



^/ 




Ted E. Teichert, Chairman 
Andover Board of Selectmen 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 



Town Offices 
36 Bartlet Street 
Andover,MA 01810 
*/P (978) 623-8200 

: <^*f www.andoverma.gov 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of the Town of Andover: 

Every year there are several events that characterize that particular year. In 2008, 
Andover had two such events. The first event took place in May on Memorial Day when the 
Town unveiled the Korean War Monument in The Park. This day and this monument gave us all 
the opportunity to finally say an official "thank you" to the men, women and their families who 
faithfully served our country in this conflict. The residents who worked on the design and its 
placement in The Park crafted a very beautiful and meaningful symbol of our everlasting 
gratitude. 

The second is more of a year-long project than a single day event. The Main Street 
Improvement Project began in the early Spring and continued until the Winter weather forced its 
closure in December. This project is funded at $3.9 million by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Highway Department and the Town's contribution is $573,500. The goal of the 
project is to make Main Street safer for pedestrians and vehicles alike. New concrete sidewalks 
with handicap ramps were installed. New "antique-style" street lights which are in scale with the 
buildings replaced the large cobra head lamp poles. Underground conduits and wiring were 
placed to make way for the more efficient and synchronized traffic signal devices. In the Spring 
of 2010, the new traffic signals, trees, benches, newsboxes and crosswalk pavers will be 
installed. The project is scheduled to be completed in the Summer of 2010 with a celebration to 
mark the "open" of our new and improved Main Street. 

Besides the Korean War Monument and the Main Street Improvement Project, the Town 
witnessed progress on a variety of fronts: 

The Water Treatment Plant's $6.5 million filter expansion project was completed and the 
new facility was brought on-line ensuring the plant's capabilities to meet the increasing 
water demands of the Town. 

The 1-93 Tri-Town Interchange Project received approvals from both the State Highway 
Department and the Federal Highway Administration to move ahead on the 
Environmental Impact Statement. This project will reduce traffic congestion on 1-93, 
improve vehicular safety, support Andover' s goal of sustainable economic development 
and minimize environmental impacts. 

The Town partnered with Merrimack College's Center for Public Opinion Research to 
conduct the 2008 Citizen Survey. The survey was sent to 1,200 residents and 672 were 
returned for a response rate of 56%! The survey looked at community life and local 
government services. Andover rated as an excellent place to live and raise children. 
Overall, the quality of life received a 90% excellent/good rating. This is a Town where 



levels of voting and civic engagement are high. Most of the municipal services were 
ranked positively with nearly all ranked excellent or good by 70% of the respondents. 

Information on these and many other Town projects can be found on the Town's website 
at www.andovernia.gov . 

Again, in 2008, Common Cause of Massachusetts honored Andover's website with its 
"Open Government" award because of the excellent context and its transparency to the public. 
The Town received the CAFR, Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial 
Reporting, for the quality of financial/management accounting information. The Plant and 
Facilities Department also won the Tree City award for 2008. 

During the year, the Town reached contractual agreements with all seven of the collective 
bargaining groups and cost savings changes were made to health insurance, sick leave and 
terminal leave provisions. Between negotiating with the employee unions and the Town's health 
insurance carrier, a double digit percentage increase was reduced to three percent. 

The Virginia Cole Community Service Award was presented at the Annual Town 
Meeting to Donald W. Robb for his outstanding, long-term contributions to the Town of 
Andover as a member of the Finance Committee, School Committee and a variety of other 
volunteer public service activities. 

At the Annual Town Election in March, Sheila M. Doherty was re-elected to the post of 
Town Moderator. Mary K. Lyman was re-elected as a Selectman. Dr. David S. Samuels chose 
not to run for re-election to the School Committee. He was replaced by Dennis F. Forgue. 

In closing, there were two fun events that occurred during the Summer that deserve 
mention. In June, Mike Chiklis, movie actor and former Andover resident, was presented with 
the "key" to the Town in a well-attended celebration on the front steps of the Town Offices. In 
July, Fox 25, a Boston television station, broadcast their "Zip Trip" program from The Park 
giving Andover wonderful media attention all over New England. 

I want to take this opportunity to thank the Board of Selectmen for their positive 
guidance, policy direction and leadership. I also want to thank the Department Heads and staff 
for their faithful service and continued efforts to make Andover the best place to live and raise a 
family. 

Your suggestions and comments are always welcome. Please use the Town's website at 
www.andoverma.gov to contact the Town or learn more about our array of services and 
programs. 

Very truly yours, 




Reginald S. Stapczynski 
Town Manager 



In Memoriam 




Kenneth R. Mahony 

July 11, 1936 - May 22, 2008 
Andover Town Manager 1982 - 1990 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

Mission & Values Statement 

Developed by the 

Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, and Town Department Heads 

Adopted by the Board of Selectmen on October 6, 2003 



The mission of the Town of Andover is to ensure the safety, education, and well-being of the 
community; to be a leader in the delivery of efficient and effective quality services that respond to 
community needs; to promote the continuous improvement of staff skills and performance; to 
encourage an environment of trust; to respect cultural and economic diversity; and to preserve the 
historic character of the community. 

The Board of Selectmen, as the chief policy makers for the Town of Andover, Massachusetts, 
will provide leadership in advancing the following primary and supporting values: 



Value 1 - Ensure the safety, education, 
and well-being of the community 

1 . 1 Protect the safety of persons and property 

1 .2 Maintain the high quality of education 
for all 

1.3 Maintain the Town's infrastructure 

1 .4 Promote public health programs and 
awareness 

1 .5 Manage the impact of non-municipal 
public utilities 

1 .6 Support human/community services 

1 .7 Ensure compliance with regulatory 
requirements 

1.8 Identify and promote economic 
opportunities 

Value 2 - Be a leader in the delivery of 
efficient and effective quality services 
that respond to community needs 

2. 1 Deliver innovative municipal services 

2.2 Encourage cost saving initiatives 

2.3 Assess and prioritize community needs 

2.4 Maintain the Town's "Aaa" bond rating 

Value 3 - Promote the continuous 
improvement of staff skills and 
performance 

3.1 Recruit, develop, and retain a highly 
skilled workforce 



3.2 Promote and recognize municipal 
professionalism 

3.3 Measure, evaluate, and improve 
performance 

Value 4 - Encourage an environment 
trust and honesty 

4. 1 Uphold high ethical standards 

4.2 Value teamwork and cooperation 

4.3 Promote open communication with the 
public 

4.4 Solicit citizen participation 

4.5 Recognize the outstanding contributions 
of citizens 

Value 5 - Respect cultural and 
economic diversity 

5.1 Promote diversity in the workforce and 
community 

5.2 Provide services that are accessible, fair, 
and equitable 

5.3 Support housing alternatives 

Value 6 - Preserve the historic 
character of the community 

6.1 Celebrate Andover's unique heritage 

6.2 Protect and acquire open space 



The Andover Vision 

As citizens of Andover, we are grateful to those in the past who nurtured the attractive, well managed, and 
vibrant town that we enjoy today. At the same time, we are mindful of our current stewardship and the fragile 
nature of much that we cherish. We have confidence that the most promising approach to the future is to 
acknowledge and act upon the values that we share. This is our Vision and our hopes and commitments for the 
Andover of the future. Vision 21 Committee - July 26, 2004 



QUALITY EDUCATION 

We will offer a rich and challenging public education that 
builds essential skills and knowledge that support a broad range 
of academic and vocational options, enable successful 
participation in our society and culture, and sustain curiosity 
and learning in a world of new and ever changing 
opportunities. We will cultivate the public library as a resource 
for lifelong learning and enrichment and as facilitator for the 
flow of information throughout the community. We will find 
ways to protect the quality of these institutions through 
fluctuating economic cycles. 



FINANCIAL STABILITY 

We will follow prudent financial practices that balance 
consistent high-quality services, private vs. public 
responsibility, stable tax rates, and responsible levels of debt. 
We will set ambitious goals but live within our means. In 
making financial decisions, we will include an understanding of 
long-term costs and consequences, particularly to the 
environmental integrity of the Town. We will consider 
regional partnerships that offer more effective and economical 
options, and we will manage the impact of our decisions on 
property values relative to similar communities. 



OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION 

We will continue to acquire and protect open space as a crucial 
natural resource that helps to maintain the character of the 
town, offers access to both active and passive recreation, and 
provides an important natural system for water recharge, flood 
control, and wildlife habitat. 



HEALTHY AND SAFE ENVIRONMENT 

We will protect public health and safety through careful 
monitoring and enforcement of environmental, health, and 
safety regulations and by continuing to provide effective and 
responsive fire and police protection and beneficial public 
health services. 



VIBRANT DOWNTOWN 

We will maintain our downtown as an attractive and vibrant 
center with a mix of commercial and public activities, historical 
elements, and parks. We will use permits, zoning guidelines, 
and planning approvals to attract and keep pedestrian-friendly 
street-level enterprises. 

SMALL-TOWN CHARACTER 

Even as the Town continues to grow, we will actively seek to 
identify and preserve those elements — town layout and scale, 
central focus, community-wide activities, respect for historical 
structures, and residential mix that give Andover its small-town 
character. 

CITIZEN PARTICIPATION 

We will govern ourselves in a manner that encourages 
participation by all, that consistently provides adequate 
information for making informed choices, and that acts to 
preserve our investment and the interests of the community as a 
whole. We will acknowledge the needs of others and consider 
compromises that are in the best interest of the Town and 
region. 



MANAGEMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES 

We will manage and protect our natural resources, particularly 
water, in a manner that acknowledges our responsibility to 
future generations and to other communities that share those 
resources. We will monitor air quality and take measures to 
mitigate negative effects of emissions from vehicles, regional 
incinerators, and industrial facilities. 

TOWN SERVICES 

We will provide effective and efficient services that build and 
maintain Town infrastructure, handle Town business, and assist 
citizens. We will use technology to facilitate interdepartmental 
communication and efficiency, and to provide public access to 
Town information. 

HUMAN SERVICES 

Through our department of community services, other Town 
programs, and religious institutions, we will sponsor services 
and programs, facilities, outreach, and recognition to veterans, 
seniors, youth, and the disabled or disadvantaged among us. 
We will foster connections among all citizens to help us to 
appreciate, learn from, and support one another. 



HISTORICAL HERITAGE 

We will maintain strong and consistent zoning that protects 
historic buildings and places, and we will support the 
institutions that protect and promote Andover' s historical 
heritage. 

CULTURAL DIVERSITY 

We will be respectful of Andover's many races, ethnicities, 
religious beliefs, and lifestyles. We will facilitate public 
events that celebrate diversity and provide opportunities for 
sharing cultural traditions. As a community, we will not 
tolerate acts of hatred or persecution. 



TRANSPORTATION 

We will monitor changing commuting patterns and side-effects 
on air and water quality, noise, and traffic. We will work 
within the region to strengthen opportunities for regional 
transit, rail travel, commuter buses, and improved connections 
with mass transit hubs. We will seek solutions to local needs 
for downtown and commuter parking, for safe and efficient 
traffic flow, and for shuttle service to local facilities and 
services. We will encourage foot and bicycle travel as an 
alternative to automobiles, whenever feasible. 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

Community Development Plan 



Background - In January 2000, the Governor issued 
Executive Order 418 providing cities and towns with 
$30,000 to create a Community Development Plan (CDP) 
to address the state's critical housing need while 
simultaneously balancing economic progress, 
transportation issues and open space preservation. The 
CDP's purpose is to encourage people to think about what 
is best for the whole community now and in the future. 
The Department of Housing and Community Development 
approved Andover's CDP in December 2004. As a result, 
Andover continues to be eligible for state funding and 
competitive grants. The Town will also use the Plan's 
conclusions to update the corresponding four sections in 
the 1992 Master Plan. 

Introduction - The Town of Andover is faced with 
several challenges: 1) Housing has become less affordable 
for those who want to live and work, or simply to remain, 
in Andover; 2) Andover must remain economically 
competitive to maintain a stable tax base; 3) Limited 
funding and the continuous development of substandard 
parcels impede the preservation of open space; and 4) 
Residential, commercial, and industrial development at the 
local and regional levels has dramatically increased traffic. 
The foundation of the CDP is the Andover Vision 
Statement. The Vision provides a framework for decision- 
making by Town officials and citizens. Where elements of 
this Plan differ from the Vision, implementation must 
involve balance and compromise, weighing the various 
inputs according to their proportionate value. 

Economic Development Element - Andover has a 
strong local economy that was created through properly 
designed land uses, strong planning, and good positioning. 
In order to be competitive in the changing economy, it is 
recommended that the Town proceed with the following 
economic strategies: 1) Create a new management and 
marketing organization or committee that focuses on local 
business interests while utilizing the marketing skills of 
regional organizations; 2) Consider adopting zoning bylaw 
amendments that encourage a diverse mix of high 
quality/low impact industries and allow the development 
and redevelopment of existing parcels; 3) Improve 
infrastructure and programs that create access to industrial 
land and reduce congestion on local roads; and 4) Seek 
partnerships with Andover's business community. 

Housing Element - Over time, the enhanced economy 
has provided a tax base that created first-rate town 
services, including a high-quality school system, and 
funding for open space preservation. The result is 
increased demand for the remaining land. Housing costs 
have outpaced the region and the nation over the past ten 
years. Due to Andover approaching its build out, greater 
care is needed in planning for future land development. 
Unless measures are taken to protect and increase 



Andover's housing supply, there is a danger that people 
who were raised here and who work here, will no longer 
be able to afford Andover. The solution is coordinated 
expansion of opportunities for different market segments, 
gradually reducing pressure and opening new options. 
Suggested recommendations: 1) Keep designated 
affordable housing units in perpetuity; 2) Provide outreach 
to seniors and encourage elderly housing developments; 3) 
Establish a housing trust fund; and 4) Encourage zoning 
bylaw regulations that reuse old, industrial buildings for 
residential uses, maintain a mix of housing stock, preserve 
neighborhoods and promote new development to be 
moderate in scale. 

Open Space Element - The value of land in Andover 
has become so high; almost every parcel now in private 
hands is vulnerable to housing or commercial development 
within the next few decades. The need to protect critical 
open space areas is necessary to protect Andover's small 
town character, provide recreational opportunities, and 
continue wise management of natural resources. Suggested 
recommendations: 1) Acquire undeveloped portions of 
watershed or protect it through regulations; 2) Encourage 
developers to design subdivisions that protect critical areas 
and provide open space parcels and connections to 
conservation land; 3) Establish alternative linkages and 
trails; 4) Develop a management plan for town-owned 
conservation properties, and budget annually for 
maintenance of conservation areas; 5) Encourage volunteer 
efforts to promote proper use and maintenance whenever 
possible; and 6) Seek funding mechanisms to assist in 
continued acquisition of prioritized undeveloped land. 

Transportation Element - Andover's transportation 
system supports businesses and residences and connects 
Andover to neighboring towns and the regional interstate 
system. Although Andover has an excellent road system, 
there are issues that need attention. Over time, commercial, 
industrial, and residential development has increased the 
number of vehicles and the frequency of use into 
unaccustomed neighborhoods. Suggested recommend- 
ations: 1) Support high-speed transit systems that will link 
Andover with other areas of the Commonwealth and New 
England; 2) Support improvement of the Merrimack 
Valley Regional Transportation Authority's flexible design 
service along with expansion of days and hours of service; 
3) Repair or replace the inadequate bridges; 4) Increase 
bicycle use by providing a range of options; 5) Improve 
access and management of the River Road and Dascomb 
Rd. areas to create more efficient traffic flow and allow 
existing industrial land to be effectively developed; 6) 
Promote zoning and land use regulations that are 
consistent with the region's transportation goals; and 7) 
Build new access from 1-93 to Burtt Road and Lowell 
Junction to allow existing industrial land to be developed 
and decrease vehicle trips on neighborhood roads. 



Results Summary 

2008 Andover Citizens Survey 



Community Life Summary 

Andover is rated as an excellent place to live and 
raise children, with 97% and 96% of respondents 
rating the town as excellent or good in these two 
categories respectively. Overall quality of life 
received a 90% excellent/good rating. The areas of 
weakness appear to be shopping and dining (40% 
rate this as fair), and place to retire (54% rate this 
as fair or poor). In addition, a quarter of 
respondents indicated they were unsure about 
quality of Andover as a place to retire. 

Andover receives high marks for safety and 
appearance, with 96% of respondents rating it as 
excellent or good in terms of feeling safe, and 90% 
rating its overall appearance as excellent or good. 
Public transportation and range of housing options 
received the lowest overall ratings. Violent crime is 
not perceived as a problem in Andover, with 76% 
of respondents strongly disagreeing and 19% 
somewhat disagreeing it's an issue of concern. On 
the other hand, property crime and vandalism 
(though not graffiti) are seen as more relevant 
problems in the community. Overall, most of the 
potential problems that respondents were asked 
about did not seem to be major issues of concern. 
The one exception to this generalization appears to 
be automobile speeding, where half of the 
respondents strongly or somewhat agreed that this 
is a problem issue. 

Andover' s public schools are seen as one of the 
most attractive features of the community, with 
three quarters of the respondents rating it as 
essential or very important in their decision to 
move to and/or stay in Andover. Town services, 
location, and property values were also rated as 
extremely important in attracting respondents to 
Andover and keeping them here. 

There is a strong consensus that Andover' s stock 
of single family housing is appropriate for the 
community, with 85%) rating it as just about right. 
Opinion on the amount of multi-family and rental 
housing is more divided, with approximately 20% 
of residents feeling there is too much of these types 
of housing, and another 20%> feeling there is not 



enough. Only 1% of residents feel there is too 
much open space/farmland, while a substantial 
number (40%) feel there is not enough of this type 
of property in Andover' s current mix. 

Local Government Summary 

Andover is a town where levels of voting and 
community engagement are high. In terms of civic 
and community participation, voting rates are 
much higher than rates of attendance at Town 
Meeting. Almost 90%) of respondents said they had 
voted at least once in the past twelve months, while 
only 40%) claimed to have attended the Annual 
Town Meeting. In a separate question, 43%> of 
respondents reported attending Town Meeting at 
least once in the past three years. In addition, large 
numbers of residents attend town events (76%o), 
donate money to local groups (78%), and shop in 
the downtown district (95%) at least once a year. 

Most of the Town's services were ranked 
positively, with nearly all being rated at excellent 
or good by at least 10% of survey respondents. 
Superior services (with excellent/good scores in the 
90+ range) were: schools, police, fire, EMS, trash 
collection, recycling, library services, parks, and 
handicapped access. Services that received less 
positive ratings were: street repair/maintenance, 
sidewalk maintenance, public parking availability, 
and public transportation, which were ranked as 
fair or poor by 45-50%) of citizens. 

Contact with town officials was rated very 
positive, with 85%> of survey respondents ranking 
their experience as excellent or good across all 
criteria. 

The Andover Townsman and word of mouth are the 
primary sources of local news and information for 
residents, with over 80%> of residents reporting 
they use these sources at least occasionally to keep 
up on local town news. Electronic media, including 
newspaper websites, the town website, other 
websites or blogs, local access television, and 
email networks, were less frequently used by 
respondents as a source of local news. 



10 




DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2008 



ELECTED 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Ted E. Teichert, Ch. 
Alex J. Vispoli 
Mary K. Lyman 
Gerald Stabile, Jr. 
Brian P. Major 



2009 
2010 
2011 
2010 
2009 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Debra R. Silberstein, Ch. - 2010 

Anthony H. James - 2009 

Richard J. Collins -2010 

Arthur H. Barber - 2009 

Dennis F. Forgue - 201 1 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

James A. Cuticchia, Ch. - 2009 

Francis A. O'Connor - 2010 

Janice Burkholder -2013 

Daniel T. Grams -2011 

Calvin A. Deyermond* - 201 1 

* Appointed by Cabinet Secretary of Executive 
Office of Communities and Development 



GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL 
SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE 

Kenneth Henrick, Ch., Methuen - 2009 
Gerald H. Silverman, Andover - 2009 
Leo J. Lamontagne, Lawrence - 2009 
Richard Hamilton, Jr., Lawrence- 2009 
Pamela Neilon, Lawrence - 2009 

Thomas Grondine, Methuen - 2009 
John Driscoll, North Andover -2011 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 



Earl G. Efinger 
John H. Atchison, Jr. 
Norman C. Frost 
Donna C. Ellsworth 
Dr. Eric Stubenhaus 



-2009 
-2009 
-2009 
-2009 
-2009 



TOWN MODERATOR 

Sheila M. Doherty - 2009 



CORNELL FUND TRUSTEES 

Barbara Brandt-Saret - 20 1 

Edward Morrissey - 2009 

Richard J. Bowen - 201 1 



11 



APPOINTED 



TOWN MANAGER - REGINALD S. STAPCZYNSKI 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



TOWN YARD TASK FORCE 



Joanne F. Marden, Ch. 


-2009 


Hooks K. Johnston, Jr., Ch. 


-2009 


S. Jon Stumpf 


-2010 


Mary Jane Bausemer 


-2009 


Richard T. Howe 


-2011 


Michael Harkins 


-2009 


Stephen E. Stapinski 


-2009 


James M. Delaney 


-2009 


Paul Fortier 


-2011 


Norman J. Viehmann 


-2009 


Timothy L. Felter 


-2009 


David O. Nelson 


-2009 


Mark Merritt 


-2010 


Jack Petkus, Jr. 


-2009 


Mary O'Donoghue 


-2010 


Joseph R. Piantedosi 


-2009 


Cynthia Milne 


-2011 


Paul Materazzo 


-2009 


HOUSING PARTNERSHIP COMMITTEE 


CULTURAL COUNCIL 




Francis A. O'Connor 


-2011 


Alan Michel, Ch. 


-2010 


Sarah B. Young 


-2010 


Shelley Selwyn 


-2010 


Bruce R. Sorota 


-2009 


Denise Johnson 


-2011 


Erin M. McDonough 


-2009 


Jennifer Cullen-Struhl 


-2010 


Vinod K. Bhandari 


-2010 


Susie Novick 


-2010 


Evan Belansky 


-2011 


Donald W. Robb 


-2009 


Jonathan Fuller 


-2011 


John Riley 


-2010 


Williams S. English 


-2011 


Linda Kirk 


-2010 


Lelani Loder 


-2011 


Kathy S. Abisso 


-2011 


PLANNING BOARD 




FISHBROOK WATERSHED ADV. 


COMM. 


Paul J. Salafia, Ch. 


-2012 


Stephen S. Boynton, Ch. 


-2010 


John J. McDonnell 


-2013 


John F. Zipeto 


-2010 


Vincent A. Chiozzi, Jr. 


-2013 


David J. Adilman 


-2010 


Linn N. Anderson 


-2009 


Richard A. Bizzozero 


-2010 


Selena Goldberg 


-2009 


Thomas E. Brady 


-2010 


Joan H. Duff- Associate Member 


-2010 


Patricia M. Donahue 


-2010 


BOARD OF HEALTH 




BOARD OF ASSESSORS 




Candace Martin, Ch. 


-2010 


John R. Petty, Ch. 


-2009 


Margaret Kruse 


-2011 


David A. Billard 


-2010 


Dr. Donald Miller 


-2009 


Dennis M. Adams 


-2009 


CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 




BOARD OF REGISTRARS 




Gerald H. Silverman 


-2011 


Ronald C. Hajj 


-2012 


John B. Flynn 


-2010 


Gregory J. Rigby 


-2011 


Zeff Marusich 


-2009 


William T. Downs 


-2010 


TOWLE FUND 




ELDERLY TAX AID COMMITTEE 



Christopher S. Doherty 
John J. Cronin 
Jane Morrissey 



-2010 
-2009 
-2009 



David J. Reilly, Ch. -2011 

John R. Petty - 2009 

Klaus Lasch -2011 

Michael Burke -2011 



12 



AUDIT COMMITTEE 

Paul C. Dow, Ch. 
Robert E. Finneran 
Steven G. Caron 
Steven S. Sintros 
Kathleen O. Sherman 



-2010 
-2009 
-2011 
-2009 
-2011 



DESIGN REVIEW BOARD 

Ann E. Constantine, Ch. 
Craig D. Gibson 
Lynn W. Smiledge 
Suzanne Korschum 
Anita M. Renton 



-2010 
-2011 
-2009 
-2011 
-2010 



HOUSING TRUST FUND TRUSTEES 

Joan Duff, Ch. -2010 

Linda A. O'Connell -2010 

Carolyn Hall Finlay -2010 

Janice Burkholder - 20 1 

Reginald S. Stapczynski - 2009 



INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY COMMITTEE 

Leonard D'Innocenzo, Ch. - 2009 

George J. Cordina - 2009 

Kurt Guthmann - 2009 

Kristen Howard - 2009 

Christopher A. Imhoff - 2009 



LOWELL JCT. INTERCHANGE TASK FORCE SPRING GROVE CEMETERY TRUSTEES 



Christian C. Huntress, Ch. 


-2011 


Dr. Paul Caselle, Ch. 


-2011 


Kerry O'Kelly 


-2011 


John S. Bigelow 


-2011 


William S. Holt 


-2011 


Arthur H. Richter 


-2009 


Beth A. Niemi 


-2011 


Sandra Dearborn 


-2010 


James D. Doherty 


-2011 


Jennifer Smith 


-2010 


BALLARD VALE FIRE STATION BLG. COMM. 


CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Donald D. Cooper, Ch. 




Daniel S. Casper, Ch. 


-2011 


-2011 


James T. Curtis 


-2011 


Paul J. Finger 


-2010 


George Thomson 


-2011 


Howard M. Kassler 


-2011 


James R. Ash 


-2011 


Michael Walsh 


-2009 


John J. Kiely 


-2011 


Gail Ralston 


-2009 


Emily M. Samansky 


-2011 


Alan French 


-2010 


Rebecca A. Backman 


-2011 


Alexandra Driscoll 


-2009 


MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY TRUSTEES 


PRESERVATION COMMISSION 




Karen M. Herman, Ch. 


-2011 


Karen M. Herman, Ch. 


-2009 


Carolyn A. Fantini 


-2010 


Dennis Ingram 


-2010 


Laurence J. Lamagna 


-2009 


Norma A. Gammon 


-2011 


Matthew L. Russell 


-2010 


James S. Batchelder 


-2009 


Mark N. Spencer 


-2009 


Lynn Smiledge 


-2010 


Frank Castle 


-2009 


Margaret Salafia 


-2010 


Ann Handley 


-2011 


Leslie Frost 


-2011 


SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 


RECYCLING COMMITTEE 




Mark B. Johnson, Ch. 


-2011 


Candy Dann, Ch. 


-2009 


Francine Goldstein 


-2011 


Glenn A. Rogers 


-2009 


Dr. Claudia Bach 


-2011 


Anthony Connell 


-2010 


Joseph Piantedosi 


-2011 


Marya Chapin Lundgren 


-2010 


Anthony H. James 


-2011 


Alanna McKee 


-2010 


Thomas R. Deso 


-2011 


Scott D. Stecher 


-2011 


Joseph Reilly 


-2011 


Donald Gottfried 


-2010 



13 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 



TRIAD COUNCIL 



Stephen D. Anderson, Ch. 


-2011 


Carol C. McDonough 


-2010 


Nancy K. Jeton 


-2009 


Lynne S. Batchelder 


-2010 


David W. Brown 


-2011 


Rachel Baime - Associate Member 


-2010 


Shelley Ranalli - Associate Member 


-2009 


COMMISSION ON DISABILITY 




Justin J. Coppola, Ch. 


-2011 


Jami Cope 


-2010 


Bernadette Lionetta 


-2010 


Justin J. Coppola, Jr. 


-2010 


Julie Pike 


-2010 


Madelaine St. Amand 


-2009 


Gilbert DeMoor 


-2011 


Patricia Commane 


-2011 


MAIN STREET COMMITTEE 




Clifford T. Markell, Ch. 


-2009 


Steven J. Druth 


-2009 


Judith F. Wright 


-2009 


Abigail O'Hara 


-2009 


Katherine O'Neil 


-2009 


Ann E. Constantine 


-2009 


John C. Campbell 


-2009 


John A. Simko 


-2009 


Karen M. Herman 


-2009 


Gary S. Finlayson 


-2009 


COUNCIL ON AGING 





Nancy Mulvey, Co-Ch. 
Jo-Ann Deso, Co-Ch. 
Patricia D'Ambra Tovey 
Judith G. Trerotola 
Nancy S. Gump 
Mary Jane Bausemer 
Burt M. Phinney 
Mary L. Ryan 
Francis A. O'Connor 
Joan C. Foohey 
Vincent P. Cottone 
Ann M. O' Sullivan 



2009 
2009 
2010 
2009 
2010 
2009 
2011 
2011 
2010 
2010 
2009 
2010 



Nancy A. Bailey, Co-Ch. 


-2009 


Ethel A. Olsen, Co-Ch. 


-2009 


Thomas R. Deso 


-2009 


Richard Tyler 


-2009 


Dorothy L. Bresnahan 


-2009 


Susan Toth 


-2009 


Mary Joyce Kernan 


-2009 


BALLARD VALE HISTORIC DISTRICT COMM. 


James Sheldon, Ch. 


-2010 


Diane R. Derby 


-2011 


Ron Abraham 


-2009 


Bruce S. Taylor 


-2009 


Lynn Smiledge 


-2009 


Sherry Kirby 


-2011 


David J. Hart 


-2010 


Leo M. Greene - Alternate Member 


-2009 


SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE 




David J. Reilly 


-2009 


Cynthia H. Sherlock 


-2009 


Elizabeth Roos* 


-2009 


Norman Rice 


-2009 


Rosalie Konjoian 


-2009 


Dr. Eric Stubenhaus 


-2009 


Janis T. Hill 


-2009 


Cherish Brunet 


-2009 


* Superintendent's Appointee 




PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY COMMITTEE 


Calvin A. Deyermond, Ch. 


-2009 


Michael Burke 


-2009 


Michael B. Mansfield 


-2009 


John J. Lewis 


-2009 


Joseph D. McCloskey 


-2009 


Robert S. Hamilton 


-2009 


James Bedford 


-2009 


Susan W. Ratyna 


-2009 


Stephen H. Wallingford 


-2009 


Joseph V. Leone 


-2009 


R. Scott Parrish, Jr. 


-2009 



RETIREMENT BOARD 

James A. Cuticchia, Ch. 
Robert J. O'Sullivan 
Elena M. Kothman 
Anthony K. Stankiewicz, Esq. 
Rodney P. Smith, Ex-Officio 



2011 
2011 
2010 
2011 



14 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

Richard D. Lindsay, DVM 



-2009 



VETERANS SERVICES AGENT 

Michael Burke 



2009 



MERR. VALLEY REG. TRANSIT AUTHORITY MERR. VALLEY PLANNING COMMISSION 



Planning Director Paul T. Materazzo - 2009 
Senior Planner Lisa Schwarz, Alternate - 2009 

DIR. OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 



Police Chief Brian J. Pattullo 



2009 



Paul J. Salafia - 2009 

John J. McDonnell, Alternate Member - 2009 



KEEPER OF THE LOCKUP 

Police Chief Brian J. Pattullo 



2009 



GR. LAWRENCE COMM. ACTION COUNCIL 

Judith M. Yelle - 2009 



IPSWICH RIVER WATERSHED 

MANAGEMENT COUNCIL 

Water Treatment Plant Supt. John Pollano - 2009 



GR. LAWR. SANITARY DISTRICT REP. 

DPW Director John A. Petkus, Jr. - 20 1 

FOREST WARDEN 

Fire Chief Michael B. Mansfield - 2009 



15 



TOWN OF ANDOVER DEPARTMENT/DIVISION HEAD DIRECTORY 



Community Development & Planning Department 
Health Director 
Planning Director 
Conservation Administrator 
Inspector of Buildings 
Electrical Inspector 
Plumbing, Gas & Sewer Inspector 

Community Services Director 

Elder Services Director 

Emergency Management Director 

Finance and Budget Department 
Finance Director 
Chief Assessor 
Collector/Treasurer 
Information Systems Manager 
Purchasing Agent/Insurance Coordinator 

Fire Chief 

Human Resources Director 

Plant and Facilities Department 
Director 

Superintendent of Building Maintenance 
Superintendent of Parks and Grounds 
Superintendent of Plumbing, Heating and Electrical 

Police Chief 

Operations Commander 

Public Works Department 
Director 

Highway Superintendent 
Superintendent of Water & Sewer Distribution 
Town Engineer 

Memorial Hall Library Director 

Superintendent of Schools 

Town Accountant 

Assistant Town Accountant 

Town Clerk 

Assistant Town Clerk 

Town Counsel 

Town Manager 

Assistant Town Manager 

Veterans Service Agent 

Youth Services Director 



Thomas G. Carbone 

Paul T. Materazzo 

Robert J. Douglas 

Kaija M. Gilmore 

Paul J. Kennedy 

Bruce P. Hale 

Mary L. Donohue 

Katherine D. Urquhart 

Brian J. Pattullo 

Anthony J. Torrisi 

Bruce A. Symmes 

David J. Reilly 

Barbara D. Morache 

Elaine M. Shola 

Michael B. Mansfield 

Candace A. Hall 

Joseph R. Piantedosi 

Edward S. Ataide 

Randy H. Pickersgill 

Ralph D. Knight 

Brian J. Pattullo 
Lt. James D. Hashem 

John A. Petkus, Jr. 

Christopher M. Cronin 

Morris B. Gray 

Brian W. Moore 

James E. Sutton 

Dr. Claudia L. Bach 

Rodney P. Smith 
Theodora K. Moccia 

Randall L. Hanson 
Kathleen F. McKenna 

Thomas J. Urbelis 

Reginald S. Stapczynski 
Steven S. Bucuzzo 

Michael Burke 

William D. Fahey 



16 



FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL FOUNDERS' DAY - MAY 8, 2008 

FOUNDERS ' DA Y WAS ESTABLISHED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN IN 1965 TO MARK 
THE DA TE OF THE TOWN 'S INCORPORA TION ON MAY 6, 1 646. 

HONORING TOWN AND SCHOOL EMPLOYEES 
WITH TEN OR MORE YEARS OF DEDICATED SERVICE 

TOWN DEPARTMENTS 



35 Years of Service: 



Nancy E. Richards, Library 



George P. Thomson, Fire Rescue 



30 Years of Service: 



Michael J. O'Neill, Fire Rescue 
Robert C. Sheaff, Fire Rescue 



Glenda C. Schaake, Library 



25 Years of Service: 



Thomas H. Agnew, Fire Rescue 

Brian C. Burwell, Highway Department 

Kevin J. Connors, Fire Rescue 

Barbara L. DeRosa, Library 

James M. McSurdy, Water Department 

Lawrence N. Pierce, Fire Rescue 



Mary V. Buck, Water Department 
Harry T. Collins, Police Department 
Richard A. Dalton, Fire Rescue 
John A. DiZoglio, Fire Rescue 
Rudolph A. Perron, Highway Department 



20 Years of Service: 



David M. Cantone, Police Department 

Robert A. Fraser, Plant & Facilities 

Anna D. Kjoss, Library 

Joanne E. Martel, CD&P - Health Division 

Stephen T. Stabile, Fire Rescue 

David R. VanDooren, Plant & Facilities 

Ernest T. Vocell, Fire Rescue 



Christopher Cronin, Highway Department 
Kathleen A. Grant, Dept. of Public Works 
Carolyn M. Lynch, Finance 
John K. Senee, Fire Rescue 
Barry S. Thornton, Fire Rescue 
Daniel F. Verrington, Plant & Facilities 



15 Years of Service: 



Anita L. Crowley, Treasurer's Office 

James J. Dolan, Fire Rescue 

Mary L. Rurak Burke, Police Department 



Paula A. DelDotto, Library 
John G. McMullen, Fire Rescue 
Stephen W. Surette, Highway Department 



10 Years of Service: 



David J. Carriere, Police Department 
Michelle Doucette, Community Services 
Joseph R. Favreau, Plant & Facilities 
Beth A. Kerrigan, Library 
Christopher E. McQuade, Plant & Facilities 
Bruce J. Page, Plant & Facilities 
Debra M. Ryan, Elder Services 
Dwayne B. Scruton, Plant & Facilities 



Michael W. Connor, Police Department 
Jason W. Dowd, Police Department 
Patrick E. Keefe, Police Department 
Joseph A. Mangano, Library 
David J. Milne, Police Department 
Peter J. Reming, Police Department 
Eleanor L. Sathan, Library 
Donna M. Zahoruiko, Plant & Facilities 



17 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



35 Years of Service: 

Barbara E. Bunn, Sanborn Elementary 

30 Years of Service: 

James S. Batchelder, Andover High 
Richard F. Irving, Bancroft Elementary 
Ann Marie Wilde, Andover High 

25 Years of Service: 

Teresa C. Consentino, Andover High 
Paul J. Ragnio, Andover High 

20 Years of Service: 



Linda M. Davis, Andover High 
Deborah H. Hall, Bancroft Elementary 
Felicia W. Lazarakis, Sanborn Elementary 
Karen M. Parker, Wood Hill Middle 
Deidre M. Simon, South Elementary 
Barbara S. Worcester, Technology 
Jeffrey D. Znamierowski, Andover High 



Jane E. Snow, Wood Hill Middle 



Evelyne M. Cullinane, Andover High 
Irene Velonis, High Plain Elementary 



Clarissa N. McDermott, West Elementary 



Josephine A. Goldin, Andover High 
Diane J. Krafton, Business Office 
Bruce M. Maki, Doherty Middle 
Marjorie S. Recinos, South Elementary 
Leah A. Tremblay, Andover High 
Janet M. Yedinak, High Plain Elementary 



15 Years of Service: 



Scott P. Besterman, Bancroft Elementary 
Amy D. Brady, Wood Hill Middle 
Kathleen B. Gilmore, Business Office 
Carol A. Green, Shawsheen Elementary 
Jane M. Kish, Sanborn Elementary 
Karen M. McCarthy, Doherty Middle 
Maureen K. Wittbold, Sanborn Elementary 



Janet L. Bowen, High Plain Elementary 
Laura A. Carrick, Andover High 
Faith K. Goldstein, South Elementary 
Peter J. Hall, Andover High 
Maureen D. Mackin, West Elementary 
Melissa A. Nussbaum, South Elementary 



10 Years of Service: 






Karen M. Agnew, Doherty Middle 
Claudia L. Bach, Superintendent of Schools 
Judith Berger, Sanborn Elementary 
Linda A. Breen, High Plain Elementary 
Ann S. Carlson, Sanborn Elementary 
Debra A. Casey, Andover High 
Linda A. Cerchione, South Elementary 
Charlene F. Clinton, Andover High 
Eleonora L. D'Avolio, Food Services 
Nancy J. Durkin-Calkins, West Elementary 
Julie A. Farnham, Bancroft Elementary 
Paula M. Frithsen, Bancroft Elementary 
Catherine A. Ghandchi, Bancroft Elem. 
Lynne J. M. Gorrie, Food Services 
Maria H. Hamilton, Wood Hill Middle 
Judith A. Hayes, West Elementary 

18 



H. Jane Anthony, Wood Hill Middle 
Leonard G. Beninato, Andover High 
Kimberly A. Bergey, Andover High 
Eugenia Z. Buba, West Elementary 
Evelyn S. Casey, Bancroft Elementary 
Alfred R. Cataldo, Andover High 
Janice D. Chapin, South Elementary 
Susan S. Curtis, West Middle 
Julie M. Diehl, Doherty Middle 
Meredith J. Emery, Andover High 
Bonnie A. Fields, Shawsheen Elementary 
Laurie J. Francis- Wright, Andover High 
Carol M. Gianopoulos, Sanborn Elementary 
Gordon F. Goyette, West Middle 
Marie F. Haugh, West Elementary 
Meryl K. Holber, Bancroft Elementary 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



10 Years of Service (Cont.): 

Alfred E. Hopkins, Andover High 
Marilyn A. Jordan, Andover High 
Kim E. Lemieux, Andover High 
Thomas Mead, Andover High 
Carol A. Mitchell, West Elementary 
Todd J. Nowell, Wood Hill Middle 
Paula J. Parker, Doherty Middle 
Melody A. Pelletier, Wood Hill Middle 
Mary K. Poe, Shawsheen Elementary 
Karen E. Rudis, Bancroft Elementary 
Joan F. Ruggiero, Doherty Middle 
Kimberly K. Santos, Bancroft Elementary 
Brian J. Stevens, Doherty Middle 
Joan E. Veznaian, Wood Hill Middle 



Ellen K. Johnson, South Elementary 
Linda S. Lawrence, Andover High 
Megan A. McCarthy, South Elementary 
Lisa J. Menschel, West Middle 
Heather A. Noonan, South Elementary 
Donna M. Pappalardo, Andover High 
Eric D. Pellerin, Andover High 
Roxanne Plaskon, West Middle 
Wayne R. Puglisi, Andover High 
Beth A. Rufo, West Elementary 
James D. Saalfrank, Wood Hill Middle 
Kimberly A. Serapiglia, Andover High 
Joanne C. Swenson, Food Services 
Greg N. Waters, Andover High 



TOWN RETIREMENTS: 

John A. Campbell, Fire Rescue 
Phillip E. Froburg, Police Department 
Barbara A. Hood, Central Dispatch 
Elizabeth A. Kochakian, Fire Rescue 
David F. Lynch, Fire Rescue 
Peter R. Nowell, Highway Department 
Bruce A. Symmes, Assessor's Office 



John C. Doherty, Veterans Services 
Norma J. Gammon, Library 
Joanne P. Kempton, Plant & Facilities 
Verna N. Loschi, Community Services 
Edward S. Mazzaglia, Plant & Facilities 
Arthur J. Ricci, Police Department 
Kevin J. Winters, Police Department 



SCHOOL RETIREMENTS: 

Ruth S. Baer, South Elementary 
Helen G. Briggs, West Elementary 
Jean C. Finn, Doherty Middle 
Joyce E. Galvin, Food Services 
Ronald N. Howland, Andover High 
Carolyn S. Lazzarino, Bancroft Elementary 
Eileen J. Mahan, Food Services 
Patricia Olender, Sanborn Elementary 
Walter J. Rossini, West Middle 
Lois F. Seligman, Doherty Middle 
Katie M. Tyler, Doherty Middle 



Candace B. Borrello, Doherty Middle 
William J. Cullen, Andover High 
Anne Marie Gallant, High Plain Elementary 
M. Denise Holmes, West Middle 
Stephen C. Jankauskas, Sanborn Elementary 
Joanne S. Lee, Bancroft Elementary 
Susan B. O'Brien, Pupil Personnel 
Kenneth J. Pellerin, Andover High 
Winifred L. Schwartz, South Elementary 
Regina Stein, High Plain Elementary 
Marcia E. T. Young, High Plain Elementary 



19 






FINANCE & BUDGET DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Finance Department is to build and reinforce confidence in Town 
financial management by managing and planning all financial functions in an efficient, cost 
effective and responsive manner, and, through a collaboration of team efforts, provide departments 
and the public with the necessary information to assure accuracy, accountability and justification. 



FINANCE ADMINISTRATION 

The Town Manager's Recommended Fiscal Year 2009 Budget was released on February 1 , 
2008. During the months of February, March, and April meetings were held with the Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee, School Committee and department heads to review the budget and 
warrant article requests and prepare recommendations for the Annual Town Meeting. 

In April, the Finance Committee Report was mailed to over 11,300 households. The 
Annual Town Meeting began on Wednesday, April 30, 2008 and the Fiscal Year 2009 operating 
budget (Article 4 and Article 8) was adopted in the amount of $131,690,050. This budget was an 
increase of $5,231,416 or 4.1% over the Fiscal Year 2008 operating budget of $126,458,634. 

Some of the major accomplishments for 2008 follow: 

Prepared Town Manager's Recommended FY2009 Budget 

Prepared the Five- Year Capital Improvement Plan for FY2010 - FY2014. 

Provided staff support to the Finance Committee 

Produced 2008 Finance Committee Report 

Implemented health insurance changes in co-pays to reduce Town and employee costs 

CENTRAL PURCHASING 

In 2008, the Purchasing Division processed approximately 1,418 purchase orders and 
2,966 requests for payment for the Town, and 3,678 purchase orders and 430 requests for 
payment for the School Department. During this period there were approximately 43 bids, 9 
requests for proposals and 1 Request for Written Responses that were advertised and officially 
opened. The continued utilization of the State bid contracts available to cities and towns has 
provided numerous benefits to the taxpayers of Andover. 

Throughout 2008 Andover has initiated and coordinated a number of Cooperative Bids as 
well as participated in a number of these bids with other communities. Under Massachusetts 
General Laws, two or more political subdivisions may jointly purchase goods or services through 
the bidding process. Some of the items purchased were: xerographic paper for copy machines, 
road salt, water treatment chemicals, fuel oils, vehicle fuels, office supplies, equipment and 
furniture, and school athletic and student voluntary insurance. 

Some of the major requests for proposals and bids solicited in 2008 were: 

Roof Replacement Project No. 1 - Sanborn, South and Bancroft Elementary Schools 

20 



Roof Replacement Project No. 2 - Andover High School, Shawsheen Elementary and 

Doherty Middle Schools 

Sidewalk Reconstruction - North Main Street 

Sewer Construction - Kirkland Drive 

Sewer Construction - Dascomb Road and Osgood Street 

West Elementary School Boiler Replacement Project, Phase II 

Town Offices Roof Top Units Replacement 

West Middle School Electrical Upgrades Project 

Sanborn School Electrical Services Upgrade 

Scholar Supplies, Fine Arts Supplies, Physical Education Supplies & Equipment, Athletic 

Supplies, Medical Supplies and Custodial Supplies 

Miscellaneous Road Paving Projects 

Miscellaneous Sidewalk Reconstruction and Concrete Wheelchair Ramps 

Lovely Field Stadium Sports Lighting System Replacement 

New Custom Built 1500 GPM Triple Combination Pumper 

Compost Site Grinding and Screening 

New 2009 Model Year Medium Duty Emergency Medical Rescue Vehicle 

Design and Construction Administration Services for Four Seasons Room - Senior 

Center 

Miscellaneous Road Materials and Aggregates (Annual Requirements) 

Town Yard Design Study 

Consulting and Bid Evaluation for Town Insurance 

Billing Service for Emergency Ambulance Service for Fire Rescue 

Design and Construction Administration Services for Removal and Replacement of 

Multiple Town and School Roofs 

Pizza for Andover Public Schools 

Follow-up Reinforcement of Roof Framing System - Bancroft Elementary School 

Two 2009 Heavy Duty Chassis Trucks with Dump Bodies, 43,240 G.V.W.R. 

New Unused Water Meters, Register Retrofits, Radio Frequency Meter Interface Units 

and Mobile Data Collection Device 

Building Envelope Repair Project - Town Offices and School Administration Building 

One 2008 or Current Model Year Truck 4x4, F450, 4- Wheel Drive, 15,000 GVW Cab & 

Chassis 

One 2008 or Current Model Year Cab & Chassis 4x2 Platform/Stake Body Truck with 

Power Tailgate 

Three 2009 Model marked Law Enforcement Full-size Sedans and one 2009 Model 

Administrative Full-size Sedan with Street Appearance Package 

Cooperative Bid for Office Supplies, Toner Cartridges, Equipment and Furniture 

Cooperative Bid for Highway Road Salt, Solar Salt and Liquid Calcium Chloride 32% 

Solarium Addition and Related Work - Senior Center 

The Purchasing Division is also responsible for administering the contract compliance of 
Andover' s Affirmative Action Plan as well as coordinating the Property and Casualty insurance 
and risk management for all Town and School Departments. The Human Resources Department, 
however, handles the Health and Personal insurance for both Town and School Departments. 
The Purchasing Department is also responsible for overseeing our current insurance company's 
Rewards Program that helps control and reduce losses along with providing future savings on 

21 



insurance premiums. The Town of Andover again this year received a plaque from our insurance 
company, Massachusetts Interlocal Insurance Association (MIIA), recognizing the Town for its 
High Achievement under their Loss Control Program. Participation in the MIIA Rewards 
Program earned the Town a $30,182.00 credit reducing this past year's insurance premium by 
that amount. The Purchasing Department also processed approximately 47 casually and property 
claims over the year and was able to recover $212,149.46 for the Town. 

COLLECTOR/TREASURER 

The Collector/Treasurer Division is responsible for the collection, investment and 
disbursement of all Town monies. Highlights during 2008 are as follows: 

■ Borrowed $4,313,648 for 9 months @1.79% on June 25 

Implemented a new "Positive Pay" check fraud protection program 

Conducted a sale of three Town-owned surplus parcels of land on May 21 

Borrowed $634,717 for 6 months @1.46% on June 10 from the Mass Water Pollution 

Abatement Trust for the Water Treatment Plant expansion 

Implemented the new water billing/ AR software in October 

Provided continued outstanding customer service to Andover residents 

Dollars for Scholars is a national non-profit organization. The Andover Chapter was 
formed in 1 997 with the acceptance of Article 27 at the 1 997 Annual Town Meeting. During the 
year, several fundraising events were held and donations were received from many Andover 
residents that resulted in the awarding of fifty-six scholarships in the amount of $59,500 to 
deserving Andover students pursuing further education. 

Balance: January 1 , 2008 $642,701 

Income, Donations, Gifts 121,073 

Expenses, Scholarships 50,045 

Balance: December 3 1 , 2008 $664,360 

ASSESSOR 

The Board of Assessors is responsible for the valuing all real estate and personal property 
accounts and motor vehicle excise taxes in the Town, as well as defending all appeals of these 
taxes. The three-member board is also responsible for the awarding nearly 230 property tax 
exemptions on an annual basis. Major exemption groups include senior citizens, disabled 
veterans, widows and widowers and individuals classified as blind. 

The Assessors also must conduct revaluations of all property on a triennial (every three years) 
basis. A revaluation was completed for Fiscal Year 2006. Interim adjustments were made in 
Fiscal Year 2007 and again in Fiscal Year 2008 with another revaluation completed for Fiscal 
Year 2009. The Board is responsible for meeting all Massachusetts Department of Revenue 
guidelines for property valuations, reporting of valuations and tax billing. 

The Assessor's Division gathers vast amount of property and ownership related information 

22 



that is available to the general public. Exterior digital photos are now recorded on all property 
and the valuations, sales information and other pertinent information is available on the Town's 
web site. More than 1,000 requests for public records and information are received and 
processed on an annual basis. 

The Assessor's Division completed the triennial recertification of values for FY2009 in a 
manner that allowed for timely tax billing. The Division, along with other financial staff, were 
trained and submitted all assessment and tax rate related information for approval using the 
Division of Local Service's Gateway Software. This submission software will now be used 
annually in an attempt to expedite all the necessary approvals for the tax rate to be set. 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

The Information Systems Division is responsible for maintaining and improving the 
utilization of computerized data in municipal operations including financial records, word 
processing/spreadsheet/database files, electronic transmission and other varied electronic files. 
Major functions of this division are: network administration, financial application support and 
reporting, user support for office integration software, and hardware/software/operating system 
maintenance and upgrades. The Information Systems Division supports all users of the network 
and strives to meet the many diversified needs of town government administration. Maintaining 
the integrity and improving the accessibility of all data on the network are priorities, especially 
since most users rely on network resources for daily operations. 

Highlights during the year include the following: 



Programmed and processed billing and A/R conversion from estimated sewer 

betterments to actual betterment bills totaling $20 million, in conjunction with the 

Assessor's office. 

Initiated and participated in Town technology team for regular collaboration with 

other Town technology personnel. 

Led vendor selection process for replacement of utility billing software, began 

implementation of utility billing software to include current processing and 

history conversion. 

Participated with newly created Information Technology Committee to investigate 

areas for improvement and efficiencies. 

Assisted Treasurer's Office in the implementation of the "Positive Pay" for 

payroll and accounts payable to prevent check fraud. 

Improved/implemented the automation of payroll/expense reconciliations, 

electronic reporting for 40 IK and child support deductions. 

Conducted multiple training sessions on Office 2007 and Outlook efficiencies. 

Performed website improvements to increase number of boards with agenda and 

minutes publication. 

Began improvements on wide area network security and sharing, added Youth 

Services location, improved security on web-based e-mail for use by Town 

employees; increased desktop security by staring Vista roll-out. 

Utilized new Windows features to quickly roll out PC images and create virtual 

test environments. 



23 



Assessors Annual Report 2008 







ANNUAL PROPERTY VALUATIONS 






FY2006 


FY2006 


FY2007 


FY2007 


FY2008 


FY2008 


PROPERTY TYPE 


#ACCTS 


VALUE 


#ACCTS 


VALUE 


#ACCTS 


VALUE 


SINGLE FAMILY 


8,437 


$4,736,207,600 


8,459 


$5,006,022,800 


8,480 


$4,919,136,300 


CONDO 


1,455 


355,443,200 


1,475 


367,276,700 


1,558 


398,264,000 


MULTI FAMILY 


341 


209,337,800 


335 


256,129,300 


318 


243,441,700 


VACANT LAND 


596 


74,208,300 


584 


96,945,600 


538 


77,179,800 


OTHER RESIDENCE 


30 


21,980,100 


28 


21,571,500 


21 


15,027,600 


COMMERCIAL AND CHAPTER 


248 


527,511,100 


257 


558,958,866 


270 


558,906,023 


INDUSTRIAL 


137 


536,570,500 


138 


540,662,900 


139 


551,109,200 


MLXED USE 


185 


244,588,700 


181 


244,141,900 


175 


236,081,600 


PERSONAL PROPERTY 


395 


94,200,625 


447 


99,325,718 


514 


161,324,140 


TOTAL 


11,824 


$6,800,047,925 


11,904 


$7,191,035,284 


12,013 


$7,160,470,363 



TOTAL 


MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE COLLECTIONS 

FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 
$5,000,633 $4,563,040 $4,760,216 









TAX ABATEMENTS AND EXEMPTIONS 








FY2006 


FY2006 


FY2007 


FY2007 


FY2008 


FY2008 


ANNUAL EXEMPTIONS 


NUMBER 


AMOUNT 


NUMBER 


AMOUNT 


NUMBER 


AMOUNT 


WIDOWS 




15 


4,780 


15 


4,466 


10 


$2,735 


VETERANS 




138 


85,591 


129 


103,199 


121 


$98,857 


BLIND 




24 


22,267 


26 


22,724 


22 


$18,482 


SENIORS 




39 


57,640 


41 


63,401 


42 


$66,009 


DEFERRALS 




8 


22,305 


9 


25,624 


9 


$25,492 


HARDSHIPS 


TOTALS 


I 

225 


1.000 
$193,583 


I 
221 


1,000 
$220,414 


I 
205 


$1,000 


$212,575 






FY2006 


FY2006 


FY2007 


FY2007 


FY2008 


FY2008 


ANNUAL ABATEMENTS 


NUMBER 


TAX AMOUNT 


NUMBER 


TAX AMOUNT 


NUMBER 


TAX AMOUNT 


RESIDENTIAL 




66 


50,062 


56 


64,446 


62 


$73,752 


SENIOR VOUCHER 




148 


88,800 


157 


105,975 


166 


$112,050 


COMM/IND 




11 


102,508 


9 


204,391 


4 


$92,809 


PERSONAL PROPERTY 


TOTALS 


6 

231 


1.296 
$242,666 


4 
226 


2.145 
$376,957 


2 
234 


$2,987 


$281,598 



24 



BUDGET AND TAX RATE SUMMARY 

EXPENDITURES 


FINAL 
FY2007 

124,807,982 

4,000 

50,762 

6,860 

60,247 

121,869 

2,501,545 

754,410 
$128,185,806 

9,122,219 

1,894,649 

11,016,868 

9,851,016 

1,978,605 

12,650,263 

24,479,884 

1 ,360,449 

323,322 

1,683,771 

744,000 

37,924,523 

90,261,283 
128,185,806 


FINAL 
FY2008 

130,190,002 

4,000 

1,248 



64,202 

69,450 

2,874,461 

832,176 
$133,966,089 

9,962,504 

1,894.649 

11,857,153 

9,383,000 

1 ,964,605 

12,892,816 

24,240,421 

2,820,368 

258.428 

3,078,796 

712,000 

39,888,370 

94,077.719 
133,966,089 


FINAL 
FY2009 

134,309,458 

4,000 

63,205 

223,700 



73,068 


Appropriations & Articles 

Other Local Expenditures 

Tax Title Purposes 

Final Court Judgments 

Overlay/ Other Deficits 

Other amounts 

Revenue Offsets/Cherry Sheet 

Total Other Local Expenditures 

State and County Charges 

Overlay Reserve for Abatements 
TOTAL EXPENDITURES 

REVENUES and OTHER FUNDING SOURCES 


363,973 

2,873,157 
1.127,947 


$138,674,535 

10,764,225 
1,551,447 


Revenue from State 
Cherry Sheet Estimated Receipts 
School Construction Assistance 
Total from State 

Revenue from Town 

General Local Revenue 

Revenue for Specific Purposes-Offset Receipts 

Water and Sewer Revenue 

Total Local Receipts 

Free Cash and Other Funding Sources 
Free Cash used for Warrant Articles 
Other Available Funds 
Total Free Cash and Other Funding Sources 

Free Cash used for Operating Budget 

Total Non-Property Tax Revenues and Other Funding Source 

Total Property Taxes 
TOTAL REVENUES 


12,315,672 

9,803,000 

1,691,964 

13.526.502 


25,021,466 

1,183,147 
1.597,496 


2,780,643 

580,000 

40,697,781 
97.976,754 


138,674,535 



25 



FINANCE STATISTICS 



32,100 
31,800 
31,500 
31,200 
30,900 
30,600 
30,300 
30,000 
29,700 
29,400 
29,100 



MOTOR VEHICLE BILLS 



31,914 >^ 31,767 


/*31,673 31.763\ 


31,537 


*31,427 V 1 ' 435 /\ 


\ /31.153 


30,784 V--^ / 


30,700 V / 


\ / 


\ / 


y 


29,382 



OlOlOOOOOOO 



o 



CO 

o 



PURCHASE ORDERS 



6,000 ^ 873 

5,800 

5,600 H 

5,400 

5,200 

5,000 

4,800 

4,600 

4,400 - 

4,200 

4,000 



n 5,710 



AX194- 



5,6 215,602 



5,434 



"57385" 



4,616 



5,096 



4,981 p- 



4,818 



00 CTi O 

01 Ol o 



o 



o o 



■q- m <x) r-~ 
o o o o 

fc fc fc E 



00 

o 



J 



$1,800,000 

$1,600,000 

$1,400,000 

$1,200,000 

$1,000,000 

$800,000 

$600,000 

$400,000 

$200,000 



INVESTMENT INCOME 



XI 



en 
O 
00 — 



ooCTvO^-irMro'^-Lnusr^oo 

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TOWN WEBSITE VISITS 
(Mthly. Avg.) 




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26 



TOWN CLERK 

The mission of the Town Clerk 's Office is to uphold the integrity of the Town 's democratic 
process, to maintain and preserve public records, and to act in the best interest of the community 
and the State by providing innovative, efficient, quality service. 

The Town Clerk's Office coordinated four elections and the Annual Town Meeting in 2008. 
The Presidential Election held on November 4 culminated one of the busiest years the office has 
seen in a long time - 2,358 absentee ballots were processed and 18,344 out of 22,910 registered 
voters cast a ballot. 

Vital records dating back to 1 989 have been scanned. These records are now issued through 
a scanning program that has brought great efficiencies to the servicing of vital records. 

Office volunteers continue to be a great resource and tremendous value to the Town. They 
have worked hundreds of hours assisting staff with the Town Census, inventorying permanent 
records and conducting election duties to name a few. 

The Office continues to work on upgrading the office's portion of the Town's website adding 
new forms and applications which facilitate service to the public. The TV bulletin on the Town's 
government channel has been upgraded to increase stability and allow the Town to better 
communicate with the public. 

DEPARTMENT STATISTICS : 

Town Census 

In January, the Town Census was mailed to 12,392 households. The Town's population at 
the completion of the census was 29,408. 

Voter Registration/Election Turnout 

The year ended with 21,295 active registered voters - an increase of 1,735 voters from the 
previous year - in nine precincts as follows: 



Precinct 1 - 2,290 
Precinct 4 - 2,235 
Precinct 7 - 2,397 

Election 

Presidential Primary 
Town Election 
State Primary Election 
Presidential Election 
Annual Town Meeting 



Precinct 2 - 2,307 
Precinct 5 -2,415 
Precinct 8 - 2,464 

Date 

February 5, 2008 
March 27, 2008 
September 16, 2008 
November 4, 2008 
April 30 & May 1,2008 



Precinct 3 - 


-2,450 


Precinct 6 - 


-2,335 


Precinct 9 - 


-2,402 


No. Voted 


% of Voters 


10,704 


49% 


2,770 


12% 


2,280 


10% 


18,344 


80% 


897* 


4% 



first night's attendance 



27 



2006 



2007 



2008 



Recordings 








Births Recorded 


264 


321 


249 


Marriages Recorded 


114 


114 


113 


Deaths Recorded 


290 


279 


290 


Dog Licenses Sold 


2400 


2365 


2493 


Fishing and Hunting Licenses Sold 


266 


300 


300 


Business Certificates 


107 


125 


99 


New Voter Registrations 


1501 


1320 


1735 


Passport Applications 


825 


868 


541 


Fees Collected 









Marriage Licenses 
Certified Copies 
Miscellaneous Licenses Income 
Liquor License Income 
Business Certificate Filings 
Miscellaneous Income 
Passport Fees 
Dog Licenses 
Non-Criminal Violations 
Copies of Public Records 
Fishing and Hunting Licenses 



2,875.00 

18,779.00 

12,075.00 

112,520.00 

4,635.00 

4,116.95 

24,750.00 

25,499.00 

11,175.00 

174.00 



2,920.00 

21,709.00 

12,620.00 

100,790.00 

5,720.00 

3,062.00 
26,040.00 
31,838.00 

5,400.00 
270.00 



2,900.00 

21,249.00 

14,285.00 

111,570.00 

5,245.00 

1,901.00 
13,960.00 
38,968.00 

8,150.00 
167.00 



7,173.45 * 6,814.25 ** 6,746.25 *** 



TOTAL MONIES COLLECTED 



$223,772.40 $217,183.25 $225,141.25 



* $7,049.00 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and $124.45 was 

retained by the Town. 

** $6,492.25 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and $322.00 was 
retained by the Town. 

*** $6,417.25 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and $329.00 was 
retained by the Town. 



28 



TOWN CLERK STATISTICS 



$250,000 
$225,000 
$200,000 
$175,000 
$150,000 
$125,000 
$100,000 
$75,000 
$50,000 



FEE REVENUES 







J 



200 

190 

180 

170 

160 

150 

140 

130 

120 

110 

100 

90 

80 

70 



BUSINESS CERTIFICATES 




^vvvvvvvvvv^ 



2,500 
2,450 
2,400 
2,350 
2,300 
2,250 
2,200 
2,150 
2,100 
2,050 
2,000 



DOG LICENSES 



2,439 


2,400 ^ T 




* 2,321 


2,292 / 




/ \ j^. 




2,293 


J 2,238 


2.730 






r 2,147 


/ 


2,041 



^vvvvvvvvv ^ 



VITAL RECORDS & PASSPORTS 



4,000 
3,500 
3,000 
2,500 
2,000 
1,500 
1,000 
500 




i-^t— 



-a- ""> 

-r*~ — m — =- — S 
oo rsj f> rn 



ro 



_co cR- 



ro 



■ 



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<3" 

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-rxf — r^f — <^*~ 






i 1 ' i 1 - ' — ■ ■ ' ' ■ i ' ' ' ■ ' ™ ' ' ■'■' ' * ' 



a 



$ .# 



a Vitals 



Passports 



29 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Andover Police Department is to protect our future and the quality of 
life in Andover. We are empowered to protect life and property, but, with the changing times of 
increasing social programs, our agency has become more service-oriented to the community. To 
continue our mission, we all maintain an open door policy to the community, working with their 
suggestions, needs and thoughts so that we may preserve the way of life that we all enjoy in 
Andover. 



The Andover Police Department is committed to providing the highest level of public 
safety and service to the citizens and business people within the community. The members of the 
Department are empowered to enforce the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the 
Bylaws of the Town of Andover, to ensure that the peace and tranquility of our neighborhoods 
are maintained and that crime and the fear of crime are reduced. The Department emphasizes 
integrity, honesty, impartiality and professionalism from its members creating an environment 
that values differences and fosters fairness and flexibility in our mission. The Department 
encourages citizen input and interaction that will assist in developing sound partnerships between 
the community and the Police. Working together will protect our future and enhance the quality 
of life for everyone within the Town. 

OPERATIONS DIVISION 

The Department handled 35,153 incidents in 2008 - a 2% increase from 2007. There 
were 694 arrests( 15% increase), 487 larcenies (42% increase) and 61 burglaries (same as 2007). 



The Department issued 8,328 motor vehicle citations during the year which is a 25% 
increase from 2007. There were 899 motor vehicle accidents handled by the Department, a 15% 
decrease from the previous year. 

The Police Department continued to work closely with other Town departments, agencies 
and the community throughout the year. The Sub-Station, located on Grandview Terrace, 
continued to allow the Department to form a partnership with the residents at the Andover 
Housing Authority and the Youth Services Department through the New Horizons for Youth 
Program, which the Department has taken over funding for since the expiration of the grant. 

The Department continues to have great success with a School Resource Officer assigned 
to the Greater Lawrence Technical School. Funding for this position is provided by the Technical 
School. 

The Department also participated in numerous events including the Holiday and 
Memorial Day Parades, the Fourth of July celebrations, Safety Saturday, Andover Days, the 
Feaster Five Road Race on Thanksgiving Day as well as numerous other road races held 
throughout the year. 



30 



RECORDS DIVISION 

The Records Division provides support services to the entire Police Department. This 
service enables information to flow efficiently throughout the Department as well as to the entire 
community. 

The Police Department received more than $72,536.00 in new grant money during 2008. 
These grants allow the Department to serve the community by providing funding for personnel 
and other resources. Equipment grants allowed the Department to provide car safety seats and 
bicycle helmets to those who would otherwise not be able to afford such safety items. 
Emergency equipment such as tent body armor, gas masks, defibrillators and other emergency 
communication equipment were also purchased with this grant money. Highway Safety grants 
allowed for extra patrols, participation in several MSP Sobriety Checkpoints and enforcement 
around high accident locations. Citizen Corps grants allowed us to train citizens (CERT) in 
disaster preparedness. Our participation in a Regional Youth Court was also funded by a grant 
this year. 

The Court Section processed a total of 694 arrests and 699 summonses. This included 
tracking all Police Department cases from inception to disposition and coordinating officers' 
appearances in court. In addition, this section assists in tracking District Court cases for other 
Town Departments such as the Health Division, Building Division, etc. 

DETECTIVE DIVISION 

The Detective Division is responsible for the follow up of investigations conducted by 
the agency. The Detective Division also oversees the Substance Abuse Unit. This Unit was 
created in response to the community's request for the Police Department to take a more active 
role in combating drugs and alcohol in the Town. The Division also has one investigator 
assigned as a Juvenile Officer. He works closely with the schools and courts in processing 
Juvenile cases. 

The Detective Division continued to be actively involved in follow-up investigations 
throughout the year. The Division was instrumental in solving and identifying the perpetrators 
of numerous serious crimes as well as following the cases through the judicial system. 

The Detective Division followed up and investigated 61 burglaries and 487 larcenies. 

The Division also investigates incidents on the Internet. They recognize this new aspect 
of Internet crime as a major problem to our community and caution all parents and residents of 
the Town to be vigilant in combating this increasing problem. 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

The Animal Control Officer answered 708 calls for service in 2008. He responded to 264 
dog complaints and impounded 59 dogs and 4 cat. He also removed 141 deceased animals. In 
addition to these removed animals, there were 64 deer struck and killed by motor vehicles in 



31 



Town. 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

The Town's Emergency Management is directed by the Chief of Police and serves as the 
local link to the Federal and State Emergency Management Agencies (FEMA/MEMA), the 
Department of Homeland Security and the FBI"s Joint Terrorism Task Force. It also includes a 
network of HAM radio operators that are on standby should the need arise for auxiliary radio 
services. A Citizen Emergency Response Team (CERT) has also been established and is 
providing residents with training and equipment that will allow them to be better prepared in 
times of crisis. 

The Chief of Police is also the Town's Liaison with the regional Local Emergency 
Planning Committee (LEPC) and is responsible for coordinating the Town's response to any 
hazardous materials incident. 

The Chief of Police is the current Chairman of the Commonwealth's Northeast Homeland 
Security Regional Advisory Council. 

The Auxiliary Police assisted the regular officers of the Police Department many times 
throughout the year. They are particularly active during the holidays and on Halloween. They 
are a very dedicated group of volunteers and the Town is fortunate to have their services as a 
resource. 



32 



POLICE STATISTICS 



STOLEN VEHICLES & BICYCLES 



70 
60 

50 
40 
30 
20 
10 




A~69 




V«4 




34 ^*^8 


29 


...22 


19 ,.* 24 \i8 ^i 2 ^ 


y\\.9 


— f$- 


--■'17 N v ,„ri4 "* 


18 > 

7 Q 




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— »— n 



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0.0.000000000 



-♦— Motor Vehicles 



— Bicycles 



DOMESTIC ABUSE 




ttfctfctttttt 



PARKING VIOLATIONS 



14,000 

13,000 

12,000 

11,000 

10,000 

9,000 

8,000 

7,000 

6,000 



13,800 It 






13,749 


] 


/ \ 11,949/ \ 




,11,125/ 


L 1,374 




11,249 




♦ 10.224 




10,598 \ 


/ 9,624 * ; 


/ 8,774 


1 


♦ 6,524 



cocnO'>-irMr<-><3-u-><£>r^oo 
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VANDALISM 



360 
340 
320 
300 
280 
260 
240 
220 
200 
180 
160 
140 
120 
100 













301 


















237 


236 












216 214 217 




192 188 






















,— , 


185 


















152 150 










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33 



POLICE STATISTICS 



900 
800 
700 
600 
500 
400 
300 
200 
100 



ARRESTS 



-53- 




^8- 



35" 



21 



38 



^9- 



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-37-3^ 



W\ E3 2.2. 



35 31 
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Uuvenile 



O Adult 



ASSAULTS 




LARCENY 



500 I 
450 - 












490 
























487 


46 


5 




458 




424 


422 




















j— , 








400 -- 
















384 






- 








350 - 








_33L 












346 




353 
jdj 343 


- 
























300 - 
250 - 
200 -■ 
























































— 


—^ 




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■-H 



£££££££££££ 



BREAKING & ENTERING 



100 
90 
80 
70 

60 H 
50 
40 
30 





< 


35 






83 








71 


69 








60 < 


54 






60 61 61 '. 








51 


48 






— 






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34 



ANDOVER FIRE RESCUE 

The mission of Andover Fire Rescue is to serve the citizens of the community and its 
visitors by protecting them from the dangers created by man-made and natural emergencies. 



Andover Fire Rescue provides professional services such as fire suppression, EMS, 
technical rescue and hazardous materials response. Andover Fire Rescue aggressively attempts 
to minimize the risks associated with these incidents through effective fire prevention and 
investigation, code enforcement, public education and injury prevention programs. The 
Department is dedicated to assisting those in need regardless of the severity of the problem. 

Value Statement 

The values of Andover Fire Rescue are service to those in need and community 
involvement through the professionalism, integrity, and dedication of its personnel. 

Fire Rescue and EMS Operations 

There are two basic sub-divisions within the Operations Division of Andover Fire Rescue 
- the Fire Rescue Division and the Emergency Medical Services Division. 

The Operations Division operates on four shifts that is led by a Deputy Fire Chief who 
has the responsibility of oversight for all activities on a particular shift. Those responsibilities 
range from incident response and training to ensuring there is adequate personnel coverage to 
appropriately protect the community on a given day. 

The Operations Division has primary responsibility for responding to emergency and 
urgent calls for help from the public. Services provided include combating all types of fires, 
providing emergency medical care to the sick and injured, containing and mitigating the effects 
of leaks and spills of hazardous materials, rescuing those who are physically trapped in such 
situations as motor vehicle accidents, industrial accidents, or collapsed structures, rescuing 
persons caught in swift moving water, mitigating the hazards associated from downed power 
lines or natural gas leaks, and providing aid in situations where those in the community need 
special assistance such as lock out/in situations, or animal rescues. 

In addition to the aforementioned, all the men and women of Andover Fire Rescue 
participate in presenting public fire safety and emergency preparedness educational programs, 
safety inspections, maintaining equipment, apparatus and facilities and continually train. 

Currently, Andover Fire Rescue operates out of three fire stations with three EMT Engine 
Companies, one EMT Ladder Company and two Basic Life Support (BLS) ambulances 
providing 24/7 coverage. The fire stations are currently located on North Main Street, 
Greenwood Road and at the intersection of Clark Road and Andover Street. 



35 



Several specialized pieces of equipment (such as boats and a trench rescue trailer) are 
located throughout the community and are staffed on an "as needed" basis by personnel normally 
assigned to the engine companies. 

Andover Fire Rescue currently has one reserve engine, one reserve ladder, and two 
reserve ambulances among its fleet. The reason for the reserve apparatus is to ensure that the 
Town of Andover is appropriately protected when a "front line" truck is out of service for repairs 
or preventative maintenance and to maintain the Insurance Services Office (ISO) Class 3 rating. 

There are a total of 68 personnel, including four Deputy Chiefs, twelve Lieutenants and 
forty-eight firefighters. Suppression personnel work 24-hour schedule with one of the four 
group's on-duty each day. The level of staffing can fluctuate slightly and is absence dependent. 

One of the Deputy Chiefs serves as the Training Officer for Andover Fire Rescue and has 
the responsibility for coordinating and'or delivering all training related programs related to the 
myriad of services provided by the personnel of Andover Fire Rescue. 

This may range from the review of initial training newly hired recruits have received as a result 
of attending the Massachusetts Firefighting Academy, specialized rescue training recenification. 
or continuing education and training to the entire organization. 

The delivery of Emergency Medical Services training is provided by Paramedic and EMT 
certified personnel from outside agencies or from within the organization. Extensive federal and 
state regulations relative to the provision of emergency medical services, and the appropriate 
documentation and administrative requirements, necessitate special focus and attention. 

Fire Rescue and EMS Resources 

Andover Fire Rescue has three fire stations, each of which has one or more staffed 
companies as well as specialized and'or reserve equipment. 

Station 1. Central Station. 32 North Main Street (downtown area) 

~ Staffed companies: Engine company, ladder company, ambulance. Deputy Chief 

~ Specialized apparatus: (2) rescue boats, trench rescue trailer, and air support 

vehicle. 

Reserve apparatus: engine, ladder truck, 2 ambulances 

Station 2. Ballardvale Station. Clark Road and Andover Street 
~ Staffed company: Engine company 

Specialized apparatus: One Rescue boat 

Station 3. West Station. Greenwood Road (West Andover area) 

~ Staffed companies: Engine company, ambulance 

~ Specialized apparatus: (2) rescue boats, fire alarm bucket truck. 

Each of the four platoons consists of seventeen positions with a minimum daily staffing 
level of 16 Firefiehter/EMT's and Command staff. 



36 



Command staff: One Deputy Chief 

Engine Companies: One Lieutenant, one driver/operator and one firefighter 

Ladder Company: One driver/operator and one firefighter 

Ambulance: Town Emergency Medical Technicians 

Andover Fire Rescue currently has Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) with 
several communities to provide mutual aid, automatic mutual aid and other response needs in the 
event that the on-duty resources are overwhelmed by an incident. These agreements entail the 
provision of service by Andover Fire Rescue to other communities in return for service to the 
community of Andover. 

Fire Prevention 

The Fire Prevention Office has five primary objectives in measuring the success of its 
work. They are: 

Reduce fire loss and injuries through the administration of risk-based community 
education programs. 
■ Manage risk associated with fire and environmental emergencies through successful 
implementation of Engineering, Inspection, Code Compliance and Hazardous Materials 
Management. 

Ensure citizens can escape a fire safely, that suppression forces have the means to control 
a fire with minimal risk of injury and that damages to physical resources are minimized 
in an emergency through proactive prevention efforts in new and existing buildings. 
Investigate fire and hazardous materials incidents to understand causes and effects and 
apply lessons learned to improving our community safety programs. 
Ensure that we are meeting the service demands of our community and are providing 
excellent customer service. We strive to meet the interests of our Fire Prevention 
responsibilities while attempting to meet the interests of our customers. 

The Fire Prevention Officer also supports the Incident Commander at all escalating fire 
and rescue incidents by fulfilling the staff function of Safety Officer. The Fire Prevention 
Officer responds directly to the scene to coordinate and address any safety and personnel 
accountability concerns that may arise during the mitigation of the incident. 

Fire Rescue annually inspects three or more family dwellings, schools, theaters, and all 
public, municipal, commercial and industrial occupancies. All nursing homes, rest homes, 
hospitals infirmaries and inn holders are inspected on a quarterly basis. Fire drills are conducted 
at each and every public and private school every quarter and public sector training is conducted 
per their request as necessary. Facilities needing assistance in the development of evacuation 
plans are also afforded the guidance necessary to preparing the plans. All necessary State and 
Local permits for storage of flammables, installation of oil burners, fireworks and pyrotechnic 
displays, storage of gunpowder or blasting agents and the daily blasting or open burning permits 
are issued by Fire Prevention. 



37 



Fire Investigation 

Andover Fire Rescue is responsible for conducting fire scene investigations to determine 
origin and cause. Andover Fire Rescue has a Deputy Fire Chief who is specially trained in 
performing fire and arson investigations to determine whether the fire was accidental or arson in 
nature. Fire Investigators thoroughly examine fire scenes, interview victims, witnesses and 
potential suspects. The investigators are also responsible for collecting evidence and processing 
the evidence to determine the cause of the fire. 

Andover Fire Rescue has a Deputy Chief who teams up with members of the Andover 
Police Department, the Massachusetts Fire Marshal's Office, Massachusetts State Police and the 
Essex County District Attorneys Office in the prosecution of arson cases. All entities involved 
are required to prepare detailed reports, present evidence and testify in Court for fire cause cases. 

Fire Protection 

As a full service fire protection organization, Fire Rescue provides services ranging from 
the education of elementary school children to the rescue of elderly citizens from nursing home 
fires. Installation and maintenance of all fire alarm wiring of all coded fire alarm boxes is also 
provided. We hope to break the stereotype of sitting around waiting to respond to a fire, and we 
are actively seeking public opinion concerning the present and future activities of this 
department. 

Arson Investigation 

Fire Rescue investigates every fire to determine if arson is a cause and employs the use of 
the State Fire Marshal's office and state forensic laboratory for analysis when needed. The 
department also utilizes the services of the Andover Police Department and District attorney's 
Office to prosecute those involved in cases of arson and those committing other fire related 
crimes. 

Specialized Rescues 

In addition to fire and emergency medical services, Fire Rescue performs numerous 
rescue missions. These could and do include incidents involving stalled elevators, trench 
collapse rescue, confined spaces, high/low angle rope rescues, surface water and ice rescues. 

Hazardous Materials Response 

Fire Rescue, in cooperation with the District Hazardous Materials Team, mitigates all 
hazardous materials incidents. The District 6 Team is comprised of members of various 
departments from Billerica to Gloucester. Fire Rescue maintains records of any and all 
occupancies that store hazardous materials over the threshold amounts established by the 
Environmental Protection Agency. These records are required to be resubmitted to the 
department on an annual basis prior to March 3 1 . 



38 



Emergency Medical Services 

Andover Fire Rescue provides first response to all medical emergencies due to accidents 
or medical ailments in Andover. The surrounding communities of North Andover, Tewksbury, 
North Reading, Reading, Billerica, Methuen, and Salem, NH provide back up mutual aid 
ambulance service to those communities in need. 

In addition, the Lawrence General Hospital Paramedic Unit is requested when the 
emergency dictates the need for Advanced Life Support (ALS) based on stringent protocols 
established through collaboration between Andover Fire and Lawrence General Hospital. 
Andover' s ambulance service has recently upgraded its license from a Basic Life Support status 
to an Enhanced Life Support status as the result of placing Automatic External Defibrillators on 
all of its emergency vehicles. 



39 



FIRE STATISTICS 



FIRE CALLS 




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800 
600 
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PERMITS & LICENSES ISSUED 




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MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENTS 




40 



PLANT & FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Plant & Facilities Department is to provide a responsive, well planned 
and cost effective maintenance operation and capital improvement program for all Town and 
School buildings, parks and grounds, vehicle maintenance, cemetery, forestry and other areas 
within their responsibility. 

The Plant & Facilities Department provides scheduled and non-routine maintenance 
services to all Town and School buildings (over 1.35 million square feet), parks and grounds, 
cemetery, forestry and vehicle operations. Additionally, the Department is responsible for the 
following: 

Implementation of all major buildings and grounds capital projects including new building 

construction projects, landscape and field projects and driveway and parking areas. 

Town and School building and field rental functions. 

The Town's fuel depot. 

Spring Grove Cemetery operations. 

Compliance with environmental, health and safety regulations. 

Custodial sendees to all Town buildings. 

Town-owned traffic and streetlights. 

Building security. 

Bald Hill leaf composting facility. 

ADMINISTRATION 

The Department is managed by a Director who is supported by four Superintendents, an 
Executive Secretary, a Construction Project Manager, a Work Control Center Coordinator, two 
part-time Accounts Payable Clerks, a Business Manager, a Facilities Services Supervisor and a 
diverse group of skilled and semi-skilled Maintenance Trades Persons, Vehicle Mechanics, 
Custodians, and Grounds and Tree Workers. 

ADMINISTRATION ACCOMPLISHMENTS/HIGHLIGHTS 

Completed the installation of 175.000 S.F. of new roofing at Doherty, Sanborn. South 

and Shawsheen Schools. 

Plant & Facilities Director approved by MSB A as the designated Owner's Project 

Manager for the new Bancroft School project. 

Over 100 Summer and Fall projects completed at multiple Town and School Buildings 

and sites. 

Energy Conservation/Cost Avoidance: 

~ All schools converted to natural gas ($28,000 incentive received from Bay State 

Gas Company) 
~ Installed energy efficient lighting at the Town Offices/School Administration 
Building and Andover High School. Received 40% of funds through NGRID 
grant. Estimated annual savings of $ 1 03,000 from this project. 
~ Applied for Mass. Department of Energy Resources energy audit grant. 



41 



Thirteen Town and School buildings have been audited, and two are pending, 
which will allow the Town to apply for energy project grant funds as soon as they 
become available. 
~ Installed CO 2 sensors at multiple School and Town Building locations to regulate 
ventilation rates and save energy. 
Other Major Capital Projects completed include: 

~ Major Electrical Distribution System upgrade at West Middle School. 
~ Structural repairs at Bancroft Elementary School. 
~ New boiler at West Elementary School. 

~ New lights installed at Lovely Field Stadium. Received $75K State grant. 
~ Replaced roof HV AC units at Town Offices and School Administration areas. 
~ Site drainage system repairs at the Public Safety Center. 
Tree City USA designation for the ninth consecutive year by the National Arbor Day 
Foundation. 
Wood Park Study - Schematic design and cost estimates complete. 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE AND MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL DIVISIONS 

The Building Maintenance and Mechanical/Electrical Divisions are supervised by two 
Superintendents and provide all maintenance services including electrical, mechanical, 
plumbing, carpentry, painting and security to all Town and School buildings. The two 
Superintendents also function as Project Managers on a variety of Town/School capital 
improvement projects. Additionally, they provide mail delivery to all buildings, and maintain 
traffic signals and Town owned street light poles. 

2006 2007 2008 

School Labor Hours 20,202 23,011 20,107 

School - Total Labor & Material Cost $982,103 $1,092,701 $978,951 

Town Labor Hours 6,010 9,358 10,023 

Town - Total Labor & Material Costs $407,906 $544,508 $767,080 

Capital Projects: School -$2,11 4,254 Town -$4,11 4,569 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE AND MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

BANCROFT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
Interior structural work completed. 
Installed new access control and CCTV systems. 
Installed new carpet tile in three classrooms. 

DOHERTY MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Installed new carpet tile in the music and choral rooms. 

Masonry repairs to roof parapet wall. 

New roofing installed on auditorium. 

Removed loose ceiling and wall plaster at Veteran's Memorial Auditorium. 

Constructed temporary wood stairs to auditorium to eliminate tripping hazard. 

42 



HIGH PLAIN ELEMENTARY/WOOD HILL MIDDLE SCHOOLS 

Screened and refinished gym floors - High Plain Elementary and Wood Hill Middle 

Schools. 

Completed major warranty roof repairs. 

ANDOVER HIGH SCHOOL/COLLINS CENTER 

Installed new sign at Andover High School main entrance. 

Screened and refinished Dunn Gym floor. 

New roofing installed Andover High School and Collins Center. 

New motorized roof smoke hatches installed at the Collins Center. 

New field lighting installed at Lovely Field Stadium. Cost offset with State grant. 

Replaced spiral stairway in Tower at the Collins Center to eliminate safety hazard. 

Repaired several exterior drainage problems to the rear, side and front of the Collins 

Center, including adding new catch basins. 

Performed a drainage study at Andover High School to address drainage and flooding 

problems. 

Converted High School boilers to natural gas. New gas line installed at no cost to Town. 

Upgraded all High School interior lighting with new energy efficient lighting. Cost offset 

with 40% grant from NGRID. 

Installed CO ventilation controls in Dunn Gym and Field House (energy savings). 

Upgraded 12 classroom unit ventilators to digital controls and CO" controls to regulate 

ventilation rates and save energy. 

SANBORN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
New custodial closet constructed. 
Completely refinished gym floor. 
Installed new floor tile in one modular classroom. 
Removed dishwasher. 
Installed new roof on main hallway section. 
Replaced domestic hot water heater with new energy efficient unit. 

SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 

Changed door swing direction in Superintendent's office. 

Replaced two 50-ton rooftop HVAC units with reheat capability and CO control. 

Installed new metal drip pan over School Department Computer room. 

SHAWSHEEN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

New carpet tile installed in one modular building classroom. 

Replaced roof access stairways. 

New roofing installed on main building and modular building. 

Installed two new fresh air vent shaft roof hatches. 

Converted boilers to fire natural gas. New gas line installed by Bay State Gas Co. 

SOUTH ELEMENTARY 

Removed and repaired large section of front sidewalk. 

New roof installed. 

Converted boilers to natural gas. New gas piping provided by Bay State Gas Co. 

Replaced domestic hot water heater with new energy efficient model. 

Screened and refinished gym floor. 



43 



WEST ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Screened and refinished both gym floors. 
■ New dual fuel steam boiler installed (the other boiler was replaced last year). 
New electrical outlets installed in first and fifth grade classrooms. 
Replaced NGRID exterior parking lot lights with Town owned, building mounted, 
controllable lights to save money. 

Installed interface between interior night lighting and exterior parking lot lighting to 
security system for energy savings. All lights go out when building is secured. 

WEST MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Installed new steel walkway over side entrance near boiler room, replacing deteriorated 

masonry unit. 

Screened and refinished gym floor. 

New windows installed in the Science Wing and the Cafeteria. 

Installed new shades in the Cafe and Science Wing classrooms. 

Electrical upgrade of emergency and main power distribution systems. 

Provided natural gas to the boilers. Replaced one oil burner with new oil/gas burner. 

ALL SCHOOLS 

Fire alarm system testing and maintenance completed. 
AHERA (bi-annual) asbestos inspection completed. 

TOWN PROJECTS 

MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 
Slate shingle repairs. 

PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING 

Installed motorized damper in louver at top of hose tower, an energy and maintenance 
saver. 

SENIOR CENTER 

Bid awarded to construct new Four Season Room. 

TOWN OFFICES 

New shades installed in various offices. 

Major restoration work completed to roof parapet. 

Replaced 35 and 50-ton rooftop HVAC units with reheat capability and CO 2 control. 

Expanded/renovated the Retirement Office. 

Renovated the foyer of the Town Manager's Office. 

TOWN YARD/TO WNWIDE 

Built two new offices and a break area at the Red Spring Road maintenance building. 
Assisted with the renovation work at 37-39 Pearson St. for the Youth Services 
Department, including the installation of a Fire/Security System and Card Access system. 
Installed handicap accessible playground equipment in lower Shawsheen playground. 
Volunteers from Phillips Academy assisted with this project. 
Town Yard Study - Hired architectural firm and began study of Town Yard options. 



44 



TOWN HOUSE 

Refmished stairways and hardwood floor in Ballroom. 
Installed new carpeting in hallways and on staircases. 
Relocated Facilities Services Office to the rear of the building. 

PARKS & GROUNDS, CEMETERY and FORESTRY DIVISIONS 

The three Parks & Grounds Divisions (Parks & Grounds, Cemetery and Forestry) are 
independent and interdependent. They operate under the supervision of one Superintendent and 
share some equipment and work together on special projects. The three divisions perform many 
tasks seemingly unrelated to their principal horticultural maintenance duties, such as providing 
support to parades and other holiday events, litter control, trash removal, recycling, flagpole 
maintenance, fence/gate/backstop repairs, drainage projects, snow removal and repairing park 
benches and tables. 

PARKS & GROUNDS STATISTICS 



Man Hours 
Labor & Materials 


Schools 

6.657 

$217,768 


Town 

19,644 

$673,652 




Capital Projects 


2,245 


$29,718 


Total $31,963 


PARKS & GROUNDS DIVISION 









This division maintains over 2.75 million square feet of ball fields and 1.4 million square 
feet of lawn areas. Ball fields and lawns are located on all School and Town building sites and 
other Town properties including Recreation Park, Ballardvale Playground, Upper and Lower 
Shawsheen. the Bowling Green, Town-owned parks, playgrounds and designated islands, 
triangles and other parcels throughout the Town. Ball fields are prepared (groomed and lined) for 
all secondary school athletic events. Turf maintenance consists of mowing, aerating, watering, 
over-seeding, liming, fertilizing and weed and insect control. This division also maintains small 
trees, shrubs and shrub beds on Town property and is responsible for snow removal at all Town 
buildings. 

CEMETERY DIVISION 

Spring Grove Cemetery on Abbot Street is owned and operated by the Town, contains 
approximately sixty acres and is approximately 75% developed. During 2008, there were 39 full 
burials, 10 cremations and 35 gravesites sold for total revenue of $59,632. Cemetery operations 
and maintenance includes burials, mowing, trimming, turf care, pruning of shrubs and small 
trees, leaf pickup, Town-wide snow removal and other tasks including grounds maintenance in 
Recreation Park and special projects at other Town facilities. 

One of the major goals for the Spring Grove Cemetery for 2008 was to fully implement the 
Geographic Information System (GIS). The GIS will allow residents and visitors to call up 
standardized information about gravesite locations and view and query an interactive map of the 
cemetery. This detailed information will be available to the public in the future. This software 
program will also give detailed information about the location of lots and the sale of lots. 



45 



FORESTRY DIVISION 

The Forestry Division is responsible for the maintenance of all Town-owned trees. Forestry 
Division work includes: pruning trees, clearing storm damage, flat clearing areas of undesirable 
vegetation and removing obstructions at intersections and curves for improved visibility. The 
Forestry Division also performs roadside mowing throughout the Town and maintains the Bald 
Hill compost site. 

PARKS & GROUNDS. CEMETERY and FORESTRY ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

South School - Aerated and seeded all three fields twice during growing season. 

Upper Shawsheen Field - Aerated three times during season, over-seeded field, removed 

sod in worn areas, added 35 yards of loam, and hydro-seeded. 

Upper Shawsheen field - Expanded field irrigation by installing 18 additional sprinkler 

heads. 

Lower Shawsheen field - Aerated and seeded field two times during growing season. 

Wood Hill and High Plain - Aerated and seeded fields two times during growing season. 

Recreation Park - Aerated and seeded fields two times during growing season. 

Applied Diamond Mix to all baseball diamonds throughout Town. 

Irrigation systems maintenance - Performed Spring and Fall maintenance and performed 

system repairs. 

Fertilizer applications - Town-wide. 

West Elementary and Lower Shawsheen playgrounds - installed playground safety" 

mulch. 

Assisted PTO Group at Shawsheen School to prepare area for new Sensory Garden. 

Received Tree City U.S.A. designation from the National Arbor Day Foundation for the 

ninth consecutive year. 

Removed five hazard trees on Cemetery property, continued pruning of low hanging 

limbs throughout the cemetery. 

Responded to 137 requests for tree work by Town residents. 

Responded to 1 1 emergency tree calls from the Andover Police Department. 

Planted 16 new shade trees during the Spring of 2008. 

Bald Hill Recycling facility - Continued monitoring and providing support to the 

composting operation, which produced 4.900 cubic yards of processed compost generated 

from grass clippings and leaves. 

Coordinated the installation of the holiday decorations on Main Street. 

Celebrated Arbor Day on April 25. 2008 at the Spring Grove Cemetery by planting a 

Malus ' Spring Snow* in honor of Arbor Day. 

Forestry Division mowed vegetation that encroaches along 30 miles of Town roads. 

35 stumps ground out. chips removed, areas loamed and seeded. 

Cemetery staff assisted in the spreading of 150 cubic yards of safety mulch at 

playgrounds throughout Andover. 

Removed 120 feet of existing blacktop from old road on cemetery grounds, prepared site 

for new blacktop. 

Removed 100 feet of old road, graded, loamed and seeded this area, producing 12 new 

grave sites. 



46 



VEHICLE MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

The Vehicle Maintenance Division is supervised by a Superintendent, who is also 
responsible for purchasing and materials management for all Plant & Facilities operating 
divisions. This division provides maintenance to all Town vehicles and major pieces of 
equipment including fire apparatus, police cruisers, DPW trucks and heavy equipment, Plant & 
Facilities trucks and heavy equipment, Town/School emergency generators and other support 
vehicles. The Superintendent of the Vehicle Maintenance Division also coordinates the 
purchasing of all new Town vehicles. 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Provided preventive maintenance and general repairs to 200 Town vehicles and major 

pieces of equipment, emergency generators for 18 School and Town buildings and 56 

smaller pieces of equipment. 

Completed 907 work orders totaling 4,172 man hours and $364,741 in labor & materials. 

Provided administrative support to vehicle purchases for Town departments. 

Supported DPW snow removal operations, (Equipment maintenance and installation and 

removal of sander units). 

Maintained and repaired all fire apparatus, including assisting with federally-mandated 

inspections of the ladder trucks' hydraulic and pump systems. 



VEHICLE MAINTENANCE STATISTICS 



84,849 


86,915 


84,713 


37,895 


44,242 


45,763 


122,744 


131,157 


130,476 



2006 2007 2008 

Gasoline 
Diesel 
Total Gallons 

FACILITIES SERVICES DIVISION 

The Facilities Services Division is managed by a Supervisor who is supported by a part 
time Office Assistant. The Facilities Services Division is responsible for all Town custodial 
services, including support to the Library, Public Safety, Town House, Town Offices, and Senior 
Center. This division also schedules the use and rental of all School buildings, Town and School 
fields, and the Town House function hall to non-profit groups, private organizations, individuals, 
and Town and School activities. Note: the Field House, Dunn Gymnasium, and fields at Andover 
High School and West Middle School, are scheduled by the School Athletic Department. 

FACILITIES SERVICES ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Continued support to Town and School energy conservation initiatives. 

Continued program to improve custodial efficiency and cost savings with new labor 

saving equipment and cleaning products. 

Ongoing custodial training on methods and procedures. 

Coordinated meetings with leaders of all private youth sports and Town officials to 

support field maintenance, scheduled programs, and special projects. 



47 



RENTAL ACTIVITY 

In 2008, the rental numbers reflect the actual permits issued and entered into the 
accounting system. For every rental request received, a permit is issued and an invoice is 
generated. The number of permits decreased this year as multiple programs were put on 
individual permits to increase efficiency and decrease paperwork. 

SCHOOLS 

School rentals continued to fill the ten schools in Town. Growth was seen in the 
Department of Community Services, Youth Services, and School enrichment program uses. 
There continued to be a slight decline in School rental permits as a result of the energy 
conservation program, implemented in 2005. Five schools are available for gym rentals only 
after 6:00PM, and four schools accommodate mostly Town and School programs from 
Thanksgiving to April vacation. Weekend use of schools is not permitted from the end of 
November until after April vacation. 

FIELDS 

Town fields were rented to capacity each season in 2008. The High School, Department 
of Community Services, and Andover Youth Services programs continued to expand. All Youth 
and Adult Leagues were once again asked to maintain their programs at their current size, as 
there is no field space available for program expansion. 

ANDOVER TOWN HOUSE 

The function hall at the Andover Town House is available for rental seven days per week. 
In addition to various private rentals, the Department of Community Services is the most 
frequent weekday user, and also uses the Hall for various evening dances. Andover Youth 
Services regularly schedules concerts, dances, and other events at the Town House. The 
Andover Senior Center also hosts social events at the Town House each year. 

FACILITIES SERVICES STATISTICS 

The number of permits decreased this year as multiple programs were put on 
individual permits to increase efficiency and decrease paperwork. 

2006 2007 2008 

Schools 

Town Buildings 

Fields 

Total Permits Issued 712 777 692 

* Decrease in field permits due to Recreation Park moving under Department of Community 
Services. 



48 



485 


592 


558 


95 


100 


70 


132 


85* 


64 



PLANT AND FACILITIES STATISTICS 



160 

140 

120 

100 

80 

60 

40 

20 





TOWN BUILDING 
RENTAL PERMITS 

(Includes Town Hall & Sr. Ctr.) 







99 100 95 100 


79 
















70 




















— | 



































FY03 FY04 FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 



1,000 
900 
800 
700 
600 
500 
400 
300 
200 
100 




SCHOOL BUILDING 
RENTAL PERMITS 



871 












615 




581 592 55 8 












485 











































FY03 FY04 FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 



160 

140 

120 

100 

80 

60 

40 

20 





FIELD RENTAL PERMITS 

(Excludes Rec Park as of FY07) 



134 132 




115 


123 


































bb 
















64 



























i 











FY03 FY04 FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 



SALE OF GRAVE SITES 



120 

110 

100 

90 

80 

70 

60 

50 

40 

30 

20 

10 





233 












ol 




■- 








^ 


56 56 












48 




— . 























































FY03 FY04 FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 



49 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

The mission of the Department of Public Works is to continuously improve our quality of 
life by providing the finest potable water, state-of-the-art disposal of our wastes (liquid and 
solid) and provide safe travel on our road network. 

ENGINEERING DIVISION 

During 2008, the Engineering Division performed work for the construction of various 
projects such as: sanitary sewer rehabilitations on Balmoral Street, York Street, Carisbrook 
Street, Argyle Street, Arundel Street and Fleming Avenue; sidewalk reconstruction on North 
Main Street near Wood Park; sewer construction on Kirkland Drive and a portion of Osgood 
Street near Dascomb Road and drainage improvements on Elm Street at Foster Circle, Upland 
Road, William Street and Poor Street. This involved performing field surveys, preparing 
construction plans, cost estimates, bid specifications, construction management, layout, utility 
markouts, and inspections. 

The Division also performed field surveys and designs for upcoming 2009 construction 
projects such as drainage improvements on College Circle and William Street. 

The Engineering staff coordinated daily with the contractor, state engineers, residents and 
businesses on the Main Street Reconstruction project. 

Assistance was provided to the Highway Division for the resurfacing of ten Town streets 
this year. Staff also provided support to the Highway and Water/Sewer divisions during various 
drainage, roadway, sidewalk, water or sewer repairs. 

Work was also performed to continue implementation activities required for compliance 
with EPA's Phase II Storm water Management regulations such as locating and inspecting storm 
drain outlets in Moderate-High priority sub-watershed areas; investigation and elimination of 
illicit discharges and adding data to the GIS system to create a Town-wide drainage map. 
Activity reports from various Town departments involved in the program were documented and 
then utilized for preparation of the annual Stormwater Management report submitted to EPA in 
April. Staff also worked with the consultant and Planning, Health, Building and Conservation 
staff to develop the proposed Stormwater Management Bylaw and regulations. 

Work was also performed on further development of the Town's GIS system - develop 
the GIS website, update software, checkplots and database design; analysis of pictometry images 
for interim update of data layers; submitted address, housing and GIS data for 2010 federal 
census districts; continue development of the drainage, water and sewer utility layers; updating 
the parcel maps for the Town Assessor and creating various maps for other town departments. 

Preliminary and Definitive Subdivision Plans and Site Plans were reviewed for the 
Planning Board checking for design conformance, traffic safety, layout and adequacy of 
proposed roads and utilities. Road and utility construction in new subdivisions and site 
developments such as Winterberry Lane, Gregory Circle, Newport Circle, Andover Country 



50 



Club and numerous other sites were inspected and tested to insure compliance with Town 
construction standards. Performance Bond amounts were also calculated as requested for the 
Planning Board. 

Street opening permits for the installation and repair of various underground utilities by 
Bay State Gas Company, Verizon, Mass Electric, Comcast and other private contractors were 
issued and the necessary utility markouts and inspections were performed. This year included 
the work by Verizon to install underground conduits for their FIOS system on 54 remaining 
streets as well as new gas mains by Bay State Gas on Hidden Road, Lincoln Street, Wethersfield 
Drive, South Main Street and six other streets. 

The Engineering Division also provided and maintained records of various utilities, street 
excavations, residential and industrial site development, street layouts and road maintenance. 



ENGINEERING STATISTICS 





2006 


2007 


2008 


Storm Drain Design & Construction (ft.) 


746 





800 


Sewer Main Design & Construction (ft.) 


1,124 





4,740 


Sidewalk Design & Construction (ft.) 


16,619 





2,800 


Water Main Design & Construction (ft.) 











Streets Resurfaced (miles) 


4.1 


6.8 


5.7 


Street Opening Permits Issued & Inspected 


209 


327 


304 


Assessors Maps updated 


55 


27 


21 


Subdivision/Site Plans reviewed (# plans/# lots) 


17/40 


17/35 


16/44 


Performance Bonds figured for Planning Board 


14 


6 


7 


Drainage outfalls located, mapped and inspected 


139 


309 


45 


Subdivision Construction Inspections/Tests: 








Water mains (ft.) 


8,080 


3489 


3,132 


Sewer mains (ft.) 


5,904 


1560 


1,715 


Drain lines (ft.) 


2,862 


2998 


1,517 


Sidewalks (ft.) 


1,426 


7730 


2,294 


Roads Paved: Binder coarse (ft.) 


5,785 


3001 


1,152 


Top coarse (ft.) 


2,113 


5272 


1,993 



51 



Streets Reviewed for Town Acceptance 


5 


2 


2 


GIS data requests completed 




18 


4 


GIS Map requests completed 




20 


15 


GIS data layers maintained/edited 




19 


11 



HIGHWAY 

The Highway Division is responsible for road maintenance, including rebuilding and 
resurfacing of approximately 200 miles of existing roads. During the fall, spring and summer 
months, two sweepers are continuously kept busy cleaning winter sand off all streets and 
cleaning road construction areas. A few days per week the sweepers start work at 5 a.m. to take 
advantage of low traffic and parking conditions especially in business areas. The Highway 
Division is responsible for the maintenance of the Town's sidewalk infrastructure. The Division 
also assists the Engineering Division in inspecting new roads prior to acceptance as public ways. 
The Division is responsible for the cleaning and maintenance of all storm water culverts and 
drainage systems including catch basin and pipe cleaning as well as maintenance of water 
courses on public property impaired by beaver dams. The Highway Division is the lead agency 
responsible for snow and ice removal and flood control measures; other Town divisions assist in 
these operations. 

HIGHWAY STATISTICS 





2006 


2007 


2008 


Number of streets resurfaced 




28 


10 


Total number of miles of road resurfaced 


4 


6.9 


5.7 


Total number of feet of curbs constructed 


4,000 


6250 


6225 


Catch basins cleaned 


264 


670 


2525 


Storm drains/culverts cleaned 




256 


250 


Catch basins repaired 


90 


92 


86 


Storm drains repaired 


12 


21 


25 


Snow storms 


5 


4 


9 


Sanding events 


41 


19 


45 


Signs repaired/installed 


365 


338 


397 


Masonry wall repairs 




16 


18 



WATER TREATMENT PLANT 

During 2008, the Water Treatment Plant processed more than 2.7 billion gallons of water 
- a daily average of 7.3 million gallons - to produce over 2.3 billion gallons of finish water 
delivered to the distribution system. To augment available water supplies, 1.31 billion gallons 



52 



were diverted from the Merrimack River to Haggetts Pond through the Fish Brook pump station. 
The Fish Brook station was online for a total of 177 days over the course of the year. The chart 
below illustrates the breakdown of total water consumption. 

Weekly, monthly and quarterly sampling was completed, as well as QA/QC testing 
required to maintain full certification of the Laboratory for the analysis of potable and non- 
potable water. Over 400 samples were processed by the laboratory for neighboring towns, over 
two dozen resident-requested samples were analyzed and 78 stormwater samples were processed. 
During the four compliance periods of 2008, volatile organic compounds, secondary 
contaminants, disinfection byproducts and perchlorate levels were monitored in the finished 
water. Annual testing for bromate, nitrate and nitrite in the finished water was completed, and 
supplementary testing of the raw and finished water for synthetic organic compounds was also 
done. Weekly monitoring for coliform bacteria was conducted at the plant and throughout the 
distribution system; there were no violations of the Total Coliform Rule in 2008 and regular 
monitoring for Giardia, Cryptosporidium and enteric viruses suggests 99.9% removal of these 
organisms during the treatment process. 

The sampling portion of Andover's Initial Distribution System Evaluation and Stage 2 
Long Term Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule monitoring plans were implemented in 
2008. In compliance with recently promulgated EPA regulations, over 160 samples were taken 
and submitted for analysis. 

All operators maintained current licensing, including five operators holding 4C licenses, 
three holding 4T licenses and two holding 3D licenses. A comprehensive safety walk-through 
was completed to assess and upgrade existing safety measures as appropriate. Work continued 
on the WTP Emergency Response Plan in an effort to improve and update all information, 
including schematics and maps of pertinent valve locations throughout the distribution system. 

Water Treatment Plant staff also held seats on the New England Water Works 
Association (NEWWA) Disinfection Committee and Residuals Committee, as well as 
contributed to classes offered by NEWWA/MWWA on various pertinent topics. WTP staff also 
maintained membership in the NE/MVCC consortium for the purchase of bulk treatment 
chemicals and collaborated with the Greenscapes North Shore Initiative to bring the Greenscapes 
2008 Program to Andover in fulfillment of Water Management Act and Stormwater 
Management requirements. 

WATER TREATMENT PLANT STATISTICS 





2006 


2007 


2008 


Hydrants Repaired 


163 


191 


235 


Hydrants Replaced 


23 


17 


10 


Hydrants Inspected & Serviced 


257 


295 


315 


Hydrants Flushed 


193 


295 


170 


Water Main Breaks Repaired 


17 


22 


19 


House Service Leaks Repaired 


14 


9 


7 



53 



House Services Renewed 


22 


20 


44 


New Water Meter Accounts/Installations 


76 


126 


113 


Old Water Meters Replaced 


213 


238 


195 


Water Meters bench checked 


12 


10 


8 


Water Shut Offs/Turn On 


115 


113 


127 


60 Gate Boxes Adjusted 


65 


52 




Gallons of water treated (in millions) 


2264 


2607 


2702 


Average daily gallons pumped (in million gal.) 


6.2 


7.1 


7.3 


Maximum day (in million gallons) 


12.038 


12.62 





SEWER 

The Sewer Division is responsible for the operation and maintenance of thirteen (13) 
wastewater pumping stations and the entire system of sanitary sewers. The sewerage system 
includes 140 miles of sanitary sewers and 6,100 connections. The raw sewage discharge from 
the Shawsheen Village Pumping Station is transported by means of a force main through the City 
of Lawrence to the Greater Lawrence Sanitary District's Regional Treatment Plant in North 
Andover for treatment. 

SEWER STATISTICS 





2006 


2007 


2008 


Sewer Main Blocks Cleared 


27 


17 


13 


Sewer Main Rodded - Regular Maintenance 


73 


96 


125 


Sewer Mains Repaired/Replaced 


5 


4 


1 



SOLID WASTE / RECYCLING 

Andover has its refuse transported and processed at the Regional Waste-to-Energy Plant, 
Wheelabrator, located in North Andover, where the refuse is incinerated to generate electricity. 
The Solid Waste Division oversees the mandatory curbside recycling program for 
newspapers/magazines, junk mail, office paper, cardboard, telephone books, paperboard, steel/tin 
metal containers, glass, #1 thru #7 plastics and aluminum containers. The Town negotiated to 
earn a paper credit when the New England index ("Yellow Sheet") price for news #6 is above 
$30/ton. We earned a total credit of $50,092 last year. The Town also maintains a leaf and grass 
clippings compost site on the High Plain Road, near Bald Hill. The Town screens and grinds the 
material annually with the compost being available to Town residents. 



54 



SOLID WASTE / RECYCLING STATISTICS 





2006 


2007 


2008 


Tons of residential refuse collected 


11,932 


10954 


10292 


Tons of mixed residential paper 


2,966 


2581 


2327 


Tons of corrugated containers 


297 


287 


368 


Tons of glass recycled 


728 


737 


1000 


Tons of steel/tin containers recycled 


43 


43 


59 


Tons of #1 thru #7 plastics 


43 


43 


59 


Tons of aluminum materials 


43 


43 


59 


Tons of leaves & grass clipping composted 


6,800 


6900 


6350 



55 



PUBLIC WORKS STATISTICS 



STREET BERM CONSTRUCTION 



26, 

24, 

22, 

20, 

18, 

16, 

u 14, 

u- 12, 

10, 

8, 

6, 

4, 

2, 



000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 






22,104 . 


I 21,750 




A A 


/ \ / \ 


/ \ / \ 


/ \ / 14.35(k H,334 


1 \ / \ 


i 12 ' 115 Vmnnn \ 


/ 8.000 V 


J \ 6,225^, 


6,075 \ / 


\ / 




5DD ^. 


-_/ll4 | 



fc fc ct 



o 



fc fc 



"*■ ld \a r^ 
o o o o 

fc £ fc £ 



3,000 -i 
? onn - 






WATER TREATED 


















1 




.>->£, ouu 

C ■) c.nn 


in |v. „ in in £ 


q £,0UU 
= ~> AC\C\ 


in 


(M 






8 N" 






— Z,nUU 


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o 


rJ 








fN ™ 












~2,000 - 
§1,800 - 
^ 1,600 - 
S 1,400 - 
1,200 - 
1 r\r\r\ 






















1,UUU i i i i i i i i i i i 
cocr>0'-irsin'<rLnuDr^.co 

OICTiOOOOOOOOO 



SOLID WASTE & 
RECYCLING COLLECTION 




10,000 
8,000 
6,000 



□ Glass □ Paper □ Refuse 




56 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Memorial Hall Library is the informational, educational, and cultural heart of the 
Andover community. The library is the place of first resort for traditional and innovative library 
materials, services, and programs. It also serves as a community platform for information-based 
technological innovation. The library continually strives to maintain a standard of exceptional 
service that contributes to a higher quality of life for all members of the community at every 
stage of their lives. 

Libraries Will Get You Through Times of No Money Better than 
Money Will Get Through Times of No Libraries 

How often have we read or heard in the news media over the last six months how public 
library use has been increasing during these tough economic times? With more people facing 
economic uncertainty, use of libraries nation-wide has been increasing. Use of Memorial Hall 
Library has increased over 5% on the adult floor and over 11% in the Children's Room as the 
availability of free books, music, and films meets a bigger need. With more people using the 
library for information, use of the computers has increased 53%. 

The Children's Room fills a particular need as parents want free reading and pre-literacy 
programs for their children ages infant to 5 years. In addition, the availability of free museum 
passes, paid by the Friends of the Library and Andonna Society, makes places like the Museum 
of Science, the Children's Museum, the Aquarium, PEM, and the Zoo more affordable for 
everyone. 

Children and parents are not alone in benefitting from programming at the library. The 
month of February featured, as has been the case for 10 years now, a series of four fishing 
programs on Tuesday nights. Also, the Friends' concert series entertained 414 satisfied listeners. 
In October, the library had a series of 4 programs on the subject of "Going Green." Gary 
Hirshberg, CEO of Stony field Yogurt spoke about how consumers and businesses can be forces 
for positive and tangible environmental change. A total of 5,855 people attended library 
programs in 2008. 

In June, the Trustees of Memorial Hall Library unveiled the polar bear sculpture that now 
graces the library's front lawn. Mother Aurora with her three cubs named Klondike, Snowflake, 
and Grace have since provided countless hours joy for children and adults alike. Keeping with 
the environmental theme intended by the polar bears, the library will feature the book The Worst 
Hard Time , by Timothy Egan as the focus book for the first ever Andover Reads in April and 
May 2009. 

Despite the increase in usage, it looks like the library will closed on Thursday evenings 
starting July 1 st . Despite budget cutbacks, Memorial Hall Library will still be open 9 AM - 9 
PM, Mondays through Wednesdays, 9 AM - 5 PM on Fridays and Saturdays, and 1 PM - 5 PM 
on Sundays. When you want to see if a book or a cd or dvd is available before visiting the 
library, check out the library catalog at www.mhl.org . Whatever your library-related need, the 
staff of the Memorial Hall Library is always ready to help you. 



57 



Accomplishments in 2008 were: 



Children's Room 

Use of the Children's Room increased with an 1 1% increase in Circulation and an 
increase in attendance at programs with enrollment in the Summer programs 
nearly doubling from last year. The Library Card Initiative with the public 
schools helped bring in new users to the Library. 

Information Technology Services 

1 . Replaced and added PCs in the Teen Room to increase access to electronic 
services for both Teens and adults. There are now 12 full-service PCs 
available. 

2. Increased access to wireless Internet access for both patrons and staff. 

3. Worked with Verizon to bring fiber into the building. 

Community Services 

With the help of funding from the Friends of the Library, Community Services 
offered 129 programs that attracted 5,855 attendees on topics including fishing, 
genealogy and the environment. 

Reference Services 

1 . An increase of reference questions at the desk and through MassAnswers 
resulted in over 70,000 questions answered. 

2. Librarians were sworn in as deputy registrars allowing patrons to register 
to vote at the Library. 

3. The Reference Library staff crafted the "Green Scene" - wiki of 
environmentally-friendly resources: web sites, organizations, books and 
DVDs. 

Trustees 

The Trustees commissioned and unveiled the granite sculpture of a polar bear 
mother and three cubs for the Library's front lawn. In conjunction with the 
sculpture, Library programming has reflected the theme of the environment. 

Circulation 

Continuing improvements in the display of materials, including "theater style" 
lighting over the DVDs have contributed to 5% increase in circulation. 

Collection Department 

1. Completed a major weeding of the mass market paperbacks and used 
donations as well as newly purchased items to renew the collection 

2. Added a Book Club browsing collection to Level 1 . 

3. Started a collection of books, magazines, newspapers, CDs, and DVDs 
about Korea, upon request of the Andover Korean-American community. 

Inter-Library Loan 

Inter-library loans increased more than 28% and the accomplishment has been to 
handle this increasing load, now more than 1 1 0,000 items per year, traveling into 
and out of the Library. 

58 



LIBRARY STATISTICS 



450,000 
400,000 
350,000 
300,000 
250,000 
200,000 
150,000 
100,000 
50,000 



BOOKS & PERIODICALS 




CO <Ti O *-< 

CTi CTi O O 

CTi CT> O O 

i-t tH (N fNI 



rsi 
o 
O 
rsi 



CO vf ld io I s * oo 

o o o o o o 

o o o o o o 

(N IN IN N (N IN 



D Children 



■ Adult 



PC & INTERNET USE 




oocno-i-irMmTLnior^co 

O^CTiOOOOOOOOO 

cncriooooooooo 
1-ii-irMrMfMrsirMrsirMfNirsi 



75,000 
70,000 
65,000 
60,000 
55,000 
50,000 
45,000 
40,000 
35,000 
30,000 



REFERENCE QUESTIONS 







ZL101 ♦ 1 


♦ 67,783 / 


/ \ 60,000 


59,618 j 


v — 4 62,426 


/ ^fcj^^i 


^♦56,992 


61,919 


/ 54,680 


54,236 






I 40,327 







oo 



C~v O y-> 

CTi O O 

Cft O O 

i-i rM rsi 



rsi ro 

O O 

o o 

rsi rsi 



O 
o 
rsj 



m vo r-v oo 

o o o o 

o o o o 

rsi rsi rsi rsi 



NON-PRINT CIRCULATION 




00 

o> 
as. 



en o 

o-i o 

OS O 

i-H rsi 



t-h rsi 

o o 

o o 

rsi rsi 



ro m - u-> vd rv oo 

o o o o o o 

o o o o o o 

rsi rsi rsi rsi rsi rsi 



i Children 



] Adult 



59 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 

BUILDING DIVISION 

The mission of the Building Division is to ensure the health, safety and •welfare of the 
Town s residents and visitors, as well as to protect the value of the historic district and historic 
structures in the Town through the enforcement of State and local Lr - -laws and regulations. 

The Building Division is charged with the enforcement of The Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Building Code. 780 CMR. .Architectural Access 3oard Rules and Regulations. 
521 CMR. The Zoning Act. Chapter 40A of the Massachusetts General Laws, the And: . 
Zoning Bylaw. .Article VIII. Section 33, Demolition of Historically Significant Buildings. 
Section 56. BallardYale Historic District Bylaw and Sectior. 5". Chimneys, :: Article XII of the 
Town of Andover Code of Byl. ell as other applicable Town and State laws and 

regulations. The Building Division reviews all documentation iplans and specificati:r._ ; 
submitted with applications for permits and is m all permits required for construction and other 
applicable activities for which permits are require.: :;■ law. The Division performs all required 
site inspections as well as Code mandated safely inspections. The Building Division responds to 
customer inquiries, complaints and emergencies. Finally, the Building Division assists other 
Divisions of the Department of Community Development and Planning, as needed, in their 
permit processing and enforcement and attends, when necessary. Zoning Board of Appeals. 
Planning Board and other Commission meetings 



BUILDING DIVISION STATISTICS 



Permit Type 



2006 



200' 



ZOOS 



New- Dwellings 



Additions Alterations to Single 
Familv Dwellings 



- v 



New Multi-Familv Dwelling; 



Additions Alterations to Multi- 
Familv Dwellings 



56 



New Commercial & Industrial 
Buildings 



Additions Alterations to 
Commercial and Industrial 
Buildings 



.:" 



:;: 



151 



Schools Public Buildings 



Swimming Pools 



Signs. Chimneys. Woodbumint 
Stoves, Raze Permits 



107 



Certificates of Inspection 



Zoning Verification 



lota! Fees Collected 



Sl_28< 



5,029 SI J 



Total Estimated Value 



s'ry 3\- 



( _ v v ~ _~' ~->C v " ~ "* C\ 



?.' 



ELECTRICAL 

The purpose of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is safeguarding the general public and 
property from the hazards arising from the use of electricity. The Electrical Inspector is 
responsible for reviewing and granting permits and scheduling inspections on a daily basis for 
residential, commercial and industrial jobs, assisting the Police and Fire Departments in the 
investigation of accidents and fires. Electrical work includes, but is not limited to, wiring for 
lighting, power, fire alarms, security alarms, telephone and other similar devices, installation of 
equipment for emergency power, generators, transformers, switch gear equipment, panel boards 
and similar equipment. The Electrical Inspector also reviews violations of the Electrical Code 
and inspects the corrective work for protection of the users and cooperates with the various 
electric companies that sendee the area. 

2006 2007 2008 

Electrical Permits 1235 1120 1147 

Fees Collected $158,026 $115,282 $106,458 

PLUMBING AND GAS 

All plumbing and gas fitting installations are controlled through enforcement of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Uniform Plumbing and Gas Code, formulated by the 
Board of State Examiners of Plumbers and Gas Fitters under Massachusetts General Laws, 

Chapter 142. 

The Plumbing and Gas Inspector issues permits for the installation of gas piping, 
plumbing and sewer installations and repairs. Inspections are conducted as necessary to ensure 
compliance with State Codes. Complaints and violations are also investigated and corrected or 
reported to the proper authorities. 



2006 2007 2008 



Plumbing Permits 


821 


655 


701 


Plumbing Fees Collected 


$50,943 


$42,992 


$41,007 


Gas Permits 


702 


577 


588 


Gas Fees Collected 


$34,240 


$32,230 


$28,517 


Seals 


8 


6 


2 


Seal Fees Collected 


$1,425 


655 


50 



61 



CONSERVATION DIVISION 

The mission of the Conservation Commission is to protect Andover's natural resources 
and to act as trustees in perpetuity of the Town 's conservation land. 

The Conservation Commission administers the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act 
and the Andover Wetlands Protection Bylaw. The Commission acquires and manages 
conservation land for passive recreation, wildlife and watershed protection purposes. Over 2,000 
acres of public land are under the control and custody of the Commission. 

The Conservation Division had a great year for volunteer partnership and participation in 
the improvement of Conservation land. Volunteers cleared new trails and re-opened old trails on 
the Bald Hill and Wood Hill Reservations. A meadow restoration project was begun to improve 
wildlife habitat and encourage the re-growth of a historic blueberry patch. 

The Commission expanded its partnership with local Eagle Scouts that, for several years, 
has proved to be a mutually beneficial relationship. In these cases, the Eagle candidate uses his 
leadership skills to perform a large community service project and the Town benefits by the new 
access and amenities. 

The 2008 Eagle projects covered many different areas of Town. One scout selected sites 
with scenic vistas of Haggetts Pond and installed several permanent benches to be used by the 
areas hikers, picnickers and dog walkers. Serio's Grove, one of the Town's premier 
Conservation properties at the 1 8-acre former Reichhold site along the Shawsheen River, was the 
recipient of two separate Eagle Scout projects including a 200-foot long safety fence, the 
clearing of new campsites, construction of a canoe landing, and the installation of several fire 
rings and log benches. This site was used for six wilderness camping trips for the scouts and the 
public, including two frosty winter overnights in February. 

Another Scout project on Rock Island in Foster's Pond created a relaxing scenic area with 
three picnic tables and wildlife enhancements including birdhouses. 

In the Spring, a joint river trip with AVIS, the Shawsheen River Association and Andover 
Youth Services, the community was provided with a free canoe trip down the Shawsheen River. 
Over twenty-five people attended and enjoyed a beautiful Spring day with a hike on the Sanborn 
Reservation, a campfire at the new picnic site at Serio's Grove and a brief discussion on the 
history of the river. 

The Commission also hosted a Summer Hike with the Senior Center "Ladies Venture 
Group" on a trail through the Bald Hill and Wood Hill reservations as well as portions of the 
adjoining lands. 

With the help of Eagle Scout volunteers and local church groups, a new trail and picnic 
table on the edge of a Conservation Pond were installed in Hearthstone Circle area. 



62 



Amenities were added to the "Dug Pond" Conservation area near Foster Pond by an 
Eagle Scout. Invasive plants were cleared and new benches were installed. 

On Pole Hill Reservation, Eagle Scouts cleared a historic trail dating back to pre- 
revolutionary war days, and constructed and installed fire rings, three picnic tables and created 
all new signage. 

The Skug River reservation benefited from an Eagle Scout project which installed a 35- 
foot bridge crossing the Skug and opening up a new area for birdwatchers and hikers. 

Last year at Town Meeting the Commission was granted a new parcel of land nicknamed 
the "chipped tooth" on River Street. The Andover Youth Services and the Shawsheen River 
Watershed Association contributed to a massive clean-up of the property. 

Volunteers from The Christian Free Church and the South Church cleared a trail along 
the Merrimack River and installed three bridges to open up a scenic pedestrian way. The 
Andover Youth Services Group "Green Team" also re-established trails and did a massive trash 
clean-up. 

The Commission, along with the Planning Division, began a study of the feasibility of 
removing the three dams along the Shawsheen River (Balmoral, Stevens Street and Balardvale). 
Initial conclusions suggest the dam removal may restore historic fish-runs for herring, salmon, 
alewife; and open boating opportunities from Andover to the Merrimack. The Commission and 
its partners hosted a public meeting at the Library to discuss the possible community and 
ecological benefits. Over eighty people attended. 

A meeting and reception for the Conservation Overseers was held in recognition of their 
volunteer service to the Town. The Overseers provide management and oversight for the 
Conservation areas in their neighborhood. 

The Commission also authorized a State-sanctioned study on the Bio-Control of the 
invasive Purple Loosestrife plant. Several hundred loosestrife eating beetles will be released on 
conservation land as part of this monitored study. 

The Commission processed several important infrastructure projects including the 
intersection improvements at Rte. 125 and Salem Street/Stinson Road and the Park & Ride at I- 
93 on Dascomb Road. 

The Commission bid farewell to Commissioner Marsha Miller after many years of 
volunteer service. Alix Driscoll was subsequently appointed as Commissioner. The 
Commission also appointed Robert H. Decelle as Special Project Manager. Robert has been a 
key member of the Conservation Team and has done an outstanding job working with our scouts 
and other volunteers. 

In the coming year, the Commission will host a Conservation Overseers meeting for our 
network of trail volunteers as well as host an Ecological Meeting for the many municipal and 



63 



environmental groups that are interested in assuring that the proposed 1-93 corridor project 
provides protection to the Town's river ways and conservation interests. The Commission also 
looks forward to improving the passive recreation interests of the conservation land on the 
former Reichhold site and other Town reservations. The Commission is particularly interested in 
opening up its Conservation reservations to citizens with disabilities. 



2006 



2007 



2008 



Conservation Commission Meetings 


24 


24 


25 


Public Hearings & Public Meetings 


232 


103 


128 


Abbreviated Notices of Resource Area 
Delineation 


4 


8 


4 


Orders of Conditions Issued 


29 


43 


23 


Amended Orders of Conditions Issued 


4 


5 


-0- 


Certificates of Compliance Issued 


25 


24 


20 


Determinations of Applicability Issued 


71 


79 


43 


Extension Permits 


10 


11 


11 


Notification of Satisfactory Completion of 
Work 


40 


24 


29 


Findings of Significance Issued 


19 


13 


13 


Enforcement Orders Issued 


11 


8 


9 


Emergency Certifications 


8 


8 


1 


Acres of Conservation Land Acquired 


51.0 


0.5 


-0- 


Wetland Filing Fees Collected 


$43,305.50 


$33,920.50 


16,775.00 


Fines (tickets) Collected 


$1,500.00 


$1,600.00 


$3,100.00 



64 



HEALTH DIVISION 

The mission of the Andover Board of Health is to promote and protect the public health 
including the physical, mental, emotional and social wellness of all the people. 

The Health Division is responsible for ensuring the protection of the public and 
environmental health. The Sanitarians supervise the inspection and public health education 
programs in matters dealing with the State Sanitary Code and the State Environmental Code, 
including complaint investigation, wastewater disposal, food safety, swimming pool operations, 
recreational camp programs, and many other services. The Public Health Nurse is primarily 
responsible for all medical clinical administrative matters, including communicable disease 
investigations, vaccination programs, and health promotion programs. The Director of Public Health 
serves as staff supervisor, ensuring that public health programs are offered in a coordinated manner, 
and is the liaison to various boards. The Director designs programs and implements policies as 
proposed by the Board of Health to meet the health needs of the community. The Board of Health 
consists of three volunteer members appointed by the Town Manager for staggered three-year terms. 

Issues of note from 2008 include: 

The Public Health Nurses continued their Shingles Vaccination Program through a general 
grant from the Andover Home for Aged Persons. This program, one of the first in the 
Commonwealth, has served 250 residents over the age of 60 and has been held out as an 
example to area communities. 

The Andover Health Division is now the host agency for the Greater River Valley Medical 
Reserve Corps which is part of the National Citizen Corps Program. A part-time coordinator 
has been hired to help recruit volunteers from the seven member communities. 
The Fish Brook Watershed Advisory Committee has worked to review various 
environmental threats to see how they affect the water quality within the watershed and will 
release its report in June 2009. 

A successful Public Health Week Program in April included the presentation of an 
information session on hoarding. 
■ Staff provided a training session for Summer Camp operators prior to camp operations. 
Two inspections of all licensed swimming pools and tanning booths were conducted. 
Staff continued its work with the regional Public Health Emergency Preparedness Coalition 
outlining emergency plans and training to respond to public health issues. 
Staff coordinated a regional response to a possible Noro-virus outbreak in the area that 
crossed municipal lines. 



HEALTH DIVISION STATISTICS 

Board of Health Meetings 
Plan Reviews 
Food Inspections 
Environmental Inspections 
Complaints Received 
Administrative Hearings 



2006 



2007 



2008 



12 


11 


14 


180 


248 


291 


197 


328 


339 


442 


386 


388 


51 


88 


110 


6 


9 


6 



65 



HEALTH DIVISION STATISTICS (Cont.) 



2006 



2007 



2008 



Total Permits Issued* 
Fees Collected* 



2053 
$172,639.71 



1603 
$142,950.33 



1347 
$151,032.27 



*In looking at these numbers, it should be noted that starting in 2006, operating permits that 
expired on December 3 1 st were renewed for the following year in December of that year. This means 
that many establishments paid for and processed operating permits for two operational periods in one 
calendar year. 



2006 



HEALTH CLINIC STATISTICS 

Outreach Clinics 

Attendance 

Senior Center Clinics 

Attendance 

Office Visits 

Home Visits 

Recreational Camps for Children/Clinical Inspection 27 

Influenza Immunization 

Pneumonia Immunization 

Cholesterol Screening Clinics 

Attendance 

Mantoux Tuberculin testing 

Positive Reactor Follow Up 

T.B. Clinic Case History, Appts. & Follow-Up 

Latent T.B. Infection Reports 

Zostavax (Shingles) Vaccine Clinics 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASES 



Animal Bites 
Brucellosis 
Chicken Pox 
Campylobacter 
Cryptosporidiosis 
Dengue Fever 
E.coli0157.H7 
Ehrlichiosis 
Giardia 
Hepatitis A 
Hepatitis B 
Hepatitis C 
Influenza A 
Legionellosis 



2006 



2007 



2007 



2008 



21 


21 


18 


245 


197 


197 


52 


49 


50 


696 


638 


556 


284 


209 


207 


50 


22 


25 


n 27 


27 


24 


1849 


1774 


1666 


33 


19 


20 


9 


11 


10 


69 


85 


44 


28 


1 


24 


9 


8 


7 


58 


49 


46 


27 


21 


19 


— 


145 


155 



2008 



35 


26 


28 


1 








14 


20 


13 


8 


7 


10 


2 


2 


1 


1 














3 








2 


2 

















9 


7 


4 


1 


6 


5 








1 





1 






66 



COMMUNICABLE DISEASES (Cont.) 







2006 


2007 


2008 


Lyme Disease (Confirmed) 




54 


8 


17 


Lyme Disease (Suspect) 




~ 


55* 


91 


Meningitis (Bacterial) 













Meningitis (Viral) 










2 


Pertussis 




4 


3 


1 


Salmonella 




4 


5 


5 


Shigella 




~ 


— 


2 


Strep Pneumonia 




5 





4 


Group A Strep 




1 








Group B Strep 




1 





1 


Tuberculosis (Active) 




2 


1 


1 


Tuberculosis (Suspect) 




3 





2 


Vibrio 




— 


— 


1 


Yersinia Entercolitica 













Suspect Disease Requiring ] 


Follow-Up 


22 


17 


29 


(* Suspect due to change in 


state reporting requirements) 






HEALTHY COMMUNITIES TOBACCO CONTROL PROGRAM 





The Healthy Communities Tobacco Program, a State-funded entity, is a collaborative made 
up of Boards of Health from twelve communities which are charged with the responsibility of 
enforcing Andover's bylaws that prohibit the sale of tobacco products to minors. This organization is 
also responsible for enforcing the Statewide ban of smoking in enclosed public places (including 
restaurants and bars) that went into effect in July of 2004. Healthy Communities serves as the 
Andover Board of Health's agent on all tobacco control issues. With Andover as the lead agency, the 
collaborative includes Haverhill, Lynnfield, Newburyport, Dracut, Methuen, Middleton, North 
Andover, North Reading, Reading, Stoneham and Topsfield. 

In an effort to curb tobacco sales to youth, Healthy Communities conducts quarterly 
compliance checks to make certain local establishments adhere to laws prohibiting sales of tobacco 
to minors. In calendar year 2008, one establishment sold tobacco products on two occasions and 
received a license suspension. 

GREATER LAWRENCE BIOTERRORISM PREPAREDNESS COALITION 

The Greater Lawrence Public Health Coalition is comprised of seven community health 
departments including Andover, North Andover, Lawrence, Methuen, North Reading, Reading and 
Lynnfield working together to improve both regional and community capability to respond to public 
health emergencies. The Town of Andover serves as the fiscal agent for the Coalition. 

Coalition activities are funded by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Cooperative 
Agreement on Public Health Preparedness and Response for Bioterrorism through a grant awarded 
by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. The coalition has established emergency plans 

67 



within each community, and in 2008 conducted a table top exercise to engage public health 
employees in learning how Emergency Dispensing Sites will be staffed and operated. Additionally, 
the coalition continues to speak regionally to public health issues, including food protection, housing 
issues, and vector borne diseases. 

GREATER RIVER VALLEY MEDICAL RESERVE CORPS 

While the Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) had been formed in 2007, the Andover Health 
Division became its host agency in spring of 2008. The MRC is a grant funded regional entity that 
falls under the federal Citizen Corps program, and serves as a clearing house for medical 
professionals to volunteer for emergencies within and outside the region. A part time coordinator has 
been hired to conduct recruitment and training, and the MRC currently boasts a membership of 
approximately 104 medical and non-medical volunteers. 



PLANNING DIVISION 

The mission of the Planning Division is to ensure the orderly growth and development of 
the Town through sound planning practices and through the implementation of the 
recommendations of the Master Plan. 

Throughout 2008, the Planning Division continued its efforts monitoring the downtown 
improvements and facilitating communication between Mass. Highway, businesses and residents. 
Massachusetts Highway Department contracted with Newport Construction to reconstruct the 
downtown beginning in January 2008 and construction is anticipated to continue through the 
Summer of 2009. Once the project is complete, the downtown from Stevens Street to Wheeler Street 
will have improved drainage, signalization, handicap and pedestrian accessibility, new streetscape 
furniture and lighting. It will be a great place to shop, walk and congregate. 

Looking to build off of the momentum and excitement that has been generated by the Main 
Street Project, the Planning Division has assembled a collaboration of local businesses, area 
stakeholders, residents and various Town departments to begin the process of developing a master 
vision plan for Shawsheen Village. The Shawsheen Renaissance Working Group has developed a 
preliminary "Vision Plan" for the Shawsheen Village area. In the coming years, the Planning 
Division will explore funding opportunities to assist with implementation. Please feel free to visit 
http://beaLitifulshavvsheen.com for further information pertaining to this project. 

The Board of Trustees for the Affordable Housing Trust Fund awarded $60,000 in grant 
money from the Northshore HOME Consortium. 

The Planning Division in conjunction with the Design Review Board rewrote Section 5.2. 
Signs in the Zoning By-law. 

During the year, division staff worked on open space preservation and wrestled with 
numerous subdivision and site plan proposals to achieve the best possible development on the 
Town's diminishing vacant lands. The staff and the Planning Board began encouraging Low Impact 

68 



Development techniques for all new development proposals to enhance compatibility with existing 
neighborhoods and mitigate environmental impacts to the greatest extent possible. 

Throughout 2008, the Planning Division has played a pivotal role in helping facilitate The 
Junction/Route 93 Development Area which represents one of the largest concentrations of 
employment in Northeastern Massachusetts. Achieving a Lowell Junction Interchange has the 
potential of opening up hundreds of acres of currently landlocked and grossly underutilized industrial 
land as well as allowing for expansion of existing industries in the area that are constrained by poor 
access to the interstate. In working in collaboration with various Town staff and community leaders 
from Andover, Tewksbury and Wilmington, the Planning Division has successfully helped develop a 
consensus "Mixed-uses Centers" land use vision for the development area. In anticipation of a new 
"Lowell Junction" interchange becoming a reality, the Planning Division had applied for and was 
successfully awarded $1.2 million dollars in MORE Grant funding from the Executive Office of 
Economic Development to assist with the engineering, design and construction of supporting 
infrastructure. 

The Planning Division has worked closely with representatives from the Towns of 
Tewksbury and Wilmington and MassHighway in developing a detailed schedule for delivering a 
new Lowell Junction Interchange. Early estimates indicated that a preliminary preferred interchange 
alternative will be available for public comment by July 2009. 

On a parallel track, the Towns of Andover, Tewksbury and Wilmington are currently engaged 
in the process of refining the unified development land use vision that would result in more efficient 
land utilization, increased tax revenues and increased economic development that will occur if each 
community acts independently of the others. 

In February of 2008, Governor Patrick signed into law the groundbreaking Slbillion Life 
Science bill. The legislation is a 10-year, $1 -billion investment in the industry and will secure and 
expand Massachusetts' life science supercluster. As stated by Governor Patrick "With this initiative 
we take our rightful place as a global leader in the life sciences." As part of the bill, Governor 
Patrick has committed $12.6 million dollars to help facilitate infrastructure improvements associated 
with the Lowell Junction development, thus helping facilitate future growth/expansion at Wyeth, one 
the state's largest life science companies. 

At the April/May 2008 Town Meetings, voters in the communities of Andover, Tewksbury 
and Wilmington unanimously voted to designate three separate Priority Development Sites at Town 
Meeting within the 1-93 Junction Development Area. By opting-in, each community received 
$100,000 in State aid ($300,000 total) which will be used to help advance the Tri-Town Task Force 
consensus mixed-use Land Vision for the development area. On September 24, 2008, the Executive 
Office of Housing & Economic Development approved the communities' regional Priority 
Development Site designation. 

For further information relating to the 1-93 Junction Development Area, please feel free to 
visit http://andoverma.gov/planning/i93' 



69 



Stemming from a successful amendment at the 2008 Annual Town Meeting and the Planning 
Board's desire to encourage expansion of the Central Business District consistent in a manner with 
the Commonwealth's Sustainable Development Principles, a Town Yard Task Force was created. 
The charge of the Task Force is to evaluate the feasibility of the reuse of the Town Yard property and 
to consider private alternatives for relocation of the existing Town Yard facility. To date, the Town 
Yard Task Force has completed their initial evaluation of existing Town-owned properties and is 
presently evaluating responses from a Request For Information from private stakeholders. 
Preliminary visioning of the potential reuse of the existing Town Yard is well on the way, with the 
Task Force commencing Phase II of their investigation. The next steps include working with Weston 
and Sampson in developing specifications for a new Town Yard, develop an RFP to help identify 
and secure a potential private site for relocation, develop 40R/Smart Growth Overlay District for the 
existing Town Yard (Lewis Street/Pearson Street) and to actively pursue various grant opportunities 
to lesson capital cost for implementation. 



PLANNING DIVISION STATISTICS 



2006 2007 2008 



Planning Board Meetings 20 20 18 

Public Hearings Held 108 108 73 

Definitive Subdivision Plans 6 3 6 

Preliminary Subdivision Plans 1 1 3 

ANR Plans 28 22 15 

Site Plan Reviews 5 3 2 

Special Permits Issued 

Lot Releases and Clearance Certificates 

Warrant Articles Reported 

Subdivision Guarantees 

Street Acceptances 

Revenues Generated 



17 


17 


11 


28 


9 


15 


13 


19 


11 


$288,820 


$92,700 


$103,000 


1 


2 





$31,728 


$28,127 


$53,515 



70 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals is authorized to function under the General Laws 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Chapter 40A, applicable sections of Chapter 40B and 
the Town's Zoning Bylaw. The Board meets on the first Thursday of each month in Memorial 
Hall at the Memorial Library, Elm Square. The Board of Selectmen appoints five regular 
members and four associate members. The public hearings by the Board are the result of 
applications in the following areas: 

A Variance from the requirements of the Zoning Bylaw; 

A Special Permit under the Zoning Bylaw; 

A person aggrieved by the decision of the Inspector of Buildings or other 

Administrative official; 

A modification or an extension of a decision; or 

Permission to construct low or moderate-income housing within the Town of 

Andover (Comprehensive Permit, M.G.L. Chapter 40B). 

Prior to the hearings, applications are reviewed and pertinent plans and sketches are 
requested, legal advertisements are published and abutters are notified as required by law. The 
Chairman, in conformity with the Board of Appeals Rules and Regulations, conducts public 
hearings. Following the hearings, the members of the Board, when deemed necessary, view each 
property in question and hold a deliberation meeting thereafter. Based on the evidence presented 
at the hearing, and the applicable laws, a decision is rendered, signed and filed with the Town 
Clerk and recorded at the Registry of Deeds upon completion of the statutory appeal period. 



Meetings: 


2006 


2007 


2008 


Hearings 1 


14 


14 


16 


Deliberations Only 


7 


6 


1 


Filed 3 


73 


79 


69 4 


Granted 


55 


58 


49 


Denied/Moot 


13 


13 


5 


Withdrawn 


7 


5 


10 


Continued/Undecided 




1 


Fees Collected^ 


$26,445 


$31,385 


$25,338 



These meetings often include both public hearings and deliberations. 

Oftentimes deliberations are held immediately after a public hearing & therefore a Saturday 
Deliberation meeting may be cancelled if no site views or deliberations are pending or continued 
to a later date. 

Some petitions contain multiple requests but pay only one fee and are counted only once. 

4 61 petitions were filed and heard in 2008; 4 were filed in '07 but heard in '08; 4 of the 61 filed 
in 2008 were heard/deliberated in '09. 

5 Only the fees collected between 1/1/08 and 12/31/08 are included in the total. 



71 



BUILDING STATISTICS 



SINGLE FAMILY 
ADDITIONS & ALTERATIONS 

948 



950 
900 
850 
800 
750 
700 
650 
600 
550 
500 





875 905 880 








827 




— 










832 








— 






7fi° 




749 






699 7 


15 /iy 








1 — |_j 

















00 
CTv 



o> 
cr> 

CTi 



O «H 

o o 

o o 

(N fM 



f\J 

o 
o 



m 
o 
o 



o 

o 



LD 
O 

o 



i£> r-^ oo 

o o o 

o o o 

N N (M 



80 
70 
60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 




SINGLE FAMILY 
NEW DWELLINGS 





*74 




\68 / \ 


55*"" 


A / \ 




\ J 44 > 46 


V<f^ 36 \ 




22 Y. 


21 16 


""> ! 





co 

CTi 



fjl O H 

en o o 

cr> o o 

■^n rsi r\i 



rsi m ^j- Ln vd r^ oo 

o o o o o o o 

o o o o o o o 

fM fM fM fM fM rsl fM 



-/ 



1,500 
1,450 
1,400 
1,350 
1,300 
1,250 
1,200 
1,150 
1,100 
1,050 
1,000 



BUILDING PERMITS 



1,483 ft 1,487 % 


l\ l\ 


J \ I \ 


1,334 / V \ i,28s 


/ 1,284 ♦ i,27oV--^* f 


* 1/2H / 


l,161/\, / 


*1,141 


\ ^ 1,H7 


Vl,075 





oo 

CTi 



Cn 
CTi 



O i-H 

O O 

O O 

r\l rM 



rsl 
O 
O 



O 
O 



o 

o 

CM 



in 
O 
O 
cm 



i^3 r^ oo 

O o o 

o o o 

fM rsl rsl 



PERMIT FEE REVENUE 



$1,900,000 

$1,700,000 

$1,500,000 

$1,300,000 

$1,100,000 

$900,000 

$700,000 

$500,000 

$300,000 - 



$100,000 



<" n T in 



oocnoi-irMm'<d _ Lnvor^oo 
cncrvooooooooo 
cTicriooooooooo 
i-Hi-ir\ir\ir\ir\lr\ir\ir\ir\ir\l 



72 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC HEALTH STATISTICS 



PLANNING BOARD 
PUBLIC HEARINGS 




VACCINATIONS 



2,250 

2,000 

1,750 

1,500 

1,250 

1,000 

750 

500 

250 



OO CTi O i-i 

CTi CT O O 

CTi CT O O 

i-H i-H fNl fM 



rM n \r 

o o o 

o o o 

r-J rM r\j 



in <o in. oo 

o o o o 

o o o o 

N N N (M 



60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 



PLANNING DIVISION 
PLAN REVIEWS 



220 

200 

180 

160 

140 

120 

100 

80 

60 

40 

20 



It 25 



4 r-> 

9 



3: 



11 11 



22 — 



00 CTv O 

en en o 

CT CTi O 

i-i i-i rM 



o o o 
o o o 

rM rM rM 



o 
o 
rM 



LD id rv 00 

o o o o 

o o o o 

rM rM rM cm 



□ Preliminary Subdivision 
sSite Plan Reviews 



D Definitive Subdivision 
QANRPIans 



PUBLIC HEALTH 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE 

SURVEILLANCE 











209 f \ 










163 ^ 


157 / ! 








145 *^ 


"♦Wisi 1 


118 / 


87 






—if 112 




♦. 79 / 


^• r ^"^ ^\ / 


67 




4 48 









00 CTi O i-H 

CT CT O O 

CTi CT O O 

i-i h rM rsi 



rM 
O 
o 
rM 



ro 
O 
O 
r\i 



o 
o 
r\l 



Ln io rv oo 

o o o o 

o o o o 

rM rsi r\i in 



73 



DIVISION OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 

The Division of Community Services provides the residents of Andover a myriad of 
social, educational cultural and recreational opportunities embracing diversity and accessibility 
for all. Community Services strives to rate the pulse of the community and incorporate ideas into 
valued programs for its citizens now and in the future. 

Community Services is the Town's Recreation Division providing social, educational, 
cultural and recreational opportunities to Andover residents of all ages. Daytime, evening, 
special events, workshops and public performances are offered throughout the year. A full-time 
office staff of five, hundreds of part-time adult and student employees, vendors and volunteers 
provide over 600 programs, events and trips to most of our residents. 

In addition to traditional recreational programs of leagues, fitness programs and 
children's activities, DCS also sponsors special Town- wide events, a concert series, online 
courses and themed dances held at the Old Town Hall. The Division partners with countless 
Town organizations encouraging healthy lifestyles for all. Improvements to Recreation Park 
included the installation of new softball lights this Spring and the shelters for the playground 
programs at the park. A major challenge of the Division this year was to meet all program 
directives with the retirement of an Office Assistant. Offering excellent customer service while 
providing quality in programming became a struggle with the on-going vacancy of that position 
for almost a full year. Now that DCS is fully staffed, the goal to become a million dollar business 
for FY-2010 will be back on the drawing board. Inclement weather plagued the Summer 
months affecting attendance at the concert series and all outdoor activities including the Fourth 
of July morning celebration in The Park. 



DCS PROGRAM STATISTICS: 



FALL PARTICIPATION 



Fall Classes - Youth ages 2-18 1 , 1 72 

Adults 213 

Holly Balls 291 

Special Events/Trips 1 7 1 

Kickin' Kids Soccer League 196 

Total Fall Participation 2,043 

WINTER PARTICIPATION 

Winter Classes - Youth ages 2-18 2,519 

Adults 482 

Bradford Ski - Grades 3-8 201 

Kid' s Basketball League - Grades 1-3 168 

Bob French Basketball League - Grades 4-8 469 



74 



WINTER PARTICIPATION (Cont.) 

L'il Hoopsters - Ages 4-6 90 

Sandlot T-ball - Ages 4-6 1 45 

Ballroom Dance & Mother Son Spring Fling 180 

Special Events/Trips 459 

Total Winter Participation 4,713 



SUMMER PARTICIPATION 

Summer Classes - Youth ages 2-18 1 ,590 

Adults 

120 
Special School-Age Children's Programs: 

All-Day Discovery - Grades K - 5 1 ,750 

Summer Theatre - Grades 2-10 140 

Drop-in Playground - Grades K - 5 12,100 

Drop-in Field Trips - Grades K - 5 435 

Special Pre-School Age Children's Programs: 

Half Pints - Ages 4-6 1 ,480 

Park Events - Ages 1-6 480 

Pomps Pond: 

Stickers 500 

Daily Attendance 50+/cars 

Average number of people per day 1 50/day 

Concerts: 

The Park/Fourth of July Festivities - All ages 7,400 

Special Events: 

Trips & Events - All ages 125 

Co-Ed Adult Softball League 600 

Total Summer Participation 36,720 

TOTAL YEAR-LONG PARTICIPATION 43,476+ 



75 



DCS STATISTICS 



RECREATION SERVICES REVOLVING 
FUND REVENUES & EXPENDITURES 




^V^V^V^V^V 5 



□ Revenues 



□ Expenditures 



SUMMER PLAYGROUND 
ATTENDANCE 



13,000 
12,000 
11,000 
10,000 

9,000 

8,000 

7,000 

6,000 

5,000 

4,000 | Tm ^ 

3 (0u0 1? ,4B7 3 '°^ 

2,000 
1,000 



12.485 




^vvvvv>>vv>* 



YOUTH SERVICES REVOLVING FUND 
REVENUES & EXPENDITURES 



$360,000 

$320,000 

$280,000 

$240,000 

$200,000 

$160,000 

$120,000 

$80,000 

$40,000 

$0 



tf tfi if hfi tf 



_ -COO^- u"r*-_rrs_i£rv 

rrs »n; rx 
. rs c. " - -"- 



v= t^ v tf v 1 









£rr£££££££££ 



□ Revenues 



□ Expenditures 



16, 

15, 

14, 

13, 

12, 

11, 

10, 

9, 

8, 

7, 

6, 

5, 

4, 



JULY 4TH& SUMMER 
CONCERT ATTENDANCE 

(FY06 - 08 includes fireworks & breakfast) 



000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 



~7^ — Drr 

~f> — ;r~" 



r rm 



VQ <D 



<^vvvvvvvvv ** 



76 



DIVISION OF ELDER SERVICES 

The mission of the Division of Elder Services is to identify, develop, implement and 
advocate for programs and services designed to enhance the quality of life and independence of 
elders in the community, and to provide a focal point in the community (Senior Center) where 
these programs and services can be easily accessed by elders and their families. 

The Growing Community of Residents of "Senior" Status 

As the number of Andover residents presently or soon to be 60+ steadily increases, we 
face the challenge of identifying resources for an increasingly diverse elder population. How 
pre-pared are we to meet the various needs of a population whose ages range from 60 to 1 00+? 
What resources will be needed to support our oldest seniors living independently in the com- 
munity? Will we, as a community, be ready as more residents seek assistance, either for them- 
selves or for family members? The division will continue to create and provide specialized 
programs and services in fulfillment of its mission, as laid out by the Council on Aging, 
following the charge of the Town Meeting of March 12, 1966: 

> Identify the total needs of the community's elderly population; 

> Educate the community and enlist support and participation of all citizens about these needs; 

> Design, promote or implement services to fill these needs, or coordinate existing services in 
the community; 

> Promote and support any other programs which are designed to assist elderly in the 
community; and 

> Enlist and develop capable volunteers and professional leadership for the purposes stated in 
this Article (35). 

To accomplish these goals, programs are designed to promote good health and nutrition, 
access to services and community life, financial and personal independence and to combat 
isolation. We continue to develop creative Intergenerational programs serving both seniors and 
young people from pre-school to college age. An emphasis on Health, Wellness & Nutrition 
programs provides a variety of opportunities to maintain, enhance and improve one's health. 
Continuing goals and objectives focus on improving social services, educational and recreational 
programs, intergenerational and volunteer opportunities and expanding outreach in the 
community. 

Challenges 

Increased costs and decreases in funding are compounded by an increased need for 
services. As we struggle to maintain core services with fewer resources, we have increased 
efforts to off-set related costs. Advocacy at the state and federal levels, grant writing and outside 
fund-raising are increasingly important. We are especially grateful to the 'The Friends of the 
Andover Senior Center' as well as the Andover Home for Aged People for their support. Fees 
for service cover most program costs and are supplemented by coordinating programs with other 
agencies. Programs have been developed cooperatively with the Andover/North Andover 
YMCA, Elder Services of the Merrimack Valley, and U Mass, Lowell in an effort to provide 
access to a variety of programs and services that would otherwise be limited by both space and 
economic constraints. Offsite programming creates additional challenges. Seniors interested in 
participating in programs scheduled off-site often limit their participation to one event a day so 

77 



they won't have to travel between the Senior Center and another site. Others are unable to 
participate in events not scheduled at the Senior Center because accessibility to off-site locations 
is limited by the availability of affordable and accessible transportation services. 

Increased Need 

Requests for services tend to increase in difficult economic times. Core services, 
including Transportation, the Senior Connections program, Nutrition and Meals on Wheels are 
an invaluable resource. Requests for general information from both seniors and family members 
continue to increase; due in part by the growing number of seniors choosing to remain in their 
homes. We have expanded our outreach efforts to provide information on a variety of resources 
as well as energy conservation. The need for the supportive services provided by the Geriatric 
Nurse Specialist to meet increased mental health needs has doubled in the past two years. Those 
aged 85+ are the fastest growing group receiving services. We expect these trends will continue 
as people continue to live longer and to remain in the community rather than seek long term care. 
As we have seen at the federal level and locally with fewer service options, the negative affects 
of the economy continue to impact the elderly population first, and often, most severely. 

Accomplishments 

■ Council on Aging sub-committee researched options to help support seniors who wished 
to remain in their homes resulting in the development of The Andover Villages at Home 
(TAVAH), a non-profit assisted living without walls to provide a comprehensive array of 
services to make it possible to remain at home. 

Boomer Venture, Andover Activities for the Adventurous plus 50' s was presented at the 
Annual MCOA (Massachusetts Councils on Aging) conference and received positive 
feedback as well as interest from other communities to develop similar programming. 

■ Purchased a 12-passenger van (80% of the funding was through a grant) and have begun 
to offer much needed accessible, affordable transportation with an initial focus on 
shopping which has been a goal for several years. 

TRIAD, a collaboration of the Andover Police Department, Fire Rescue, the Essex 

County Sheriff and District Attorney and the Andover Council on Aging continues to 

collect cellphones and other small electronics and games to recycle. This year, they 

brought in over $1,000. They are also working the Boy Scouts in the "Is Your Number 

Up?" campaign to ensure that all homes in Town have their street number posted and 

easily visible from the street to ensure timely emergency services. 

Over 200 people applied to participate in SCRPT, the tax work-off program, this year. 

Cultural programs such as the Andover Chroniclers (cable TV show), the SunRise singers 

and SunSet Tappers continue to share their talents with the community. 

Individuals in the tapping and woodworking classes placed first in local and national 

competitions. 

Individuals in the tapping and woodworking classes placed first in local and national 

competitions. 

Received a grant from the Office of Attorney General Martha Coakley for outreach and 

education on saving energy and resources available to help off-set increased energy costs. 

Received an Accent grant from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health to 

develop a wellness program incorporating healthy eating and exercise. Participants were, 

to a large degree, no longer participating in activities at the Senior Center due to chronic 

health conditions. As a spin off from this, an easy exercise program was re-introduced. 

78 



ELDER SERVICES STATISTICS 



ELDER SERVICES REVOLVING FUND 
REVENUES & EXPENDITURES 



120,000 1 
100,000 
80,000 



60,000 
40,000 - 
20,000 




LT 

CPU 



eg 

3" ^ !^ tf 



cr 
— lt 



' $« 



& .& 



cs* .cO' .cv> 



jcp ,cy» ,<$> x>> xf xp xr ,& s£ <& .<$> 

^ X 1 X* X s X* X X X X X X 



n Revenue 



□ Expenditure 



VALUE OF ELDER SERVICES 
VOLUNTEER SERVICE 



$550,000 
$500,000 
$450,000 
$400,000 
$350,000 
$300,000 
$250,000 
$200,000 



$485,385 $494,019 



$470,938. 



"T 



$439,600 $400,525 



/ $349.818 $391 ' 04 5 ,, 
1^ $347,910 



$368,498 



$362,505 



* $220,782 



/VVVVV>>V>V* 



$260,000 
$240,000 
$220,000 
$200,000 
$180,000 
$160,000 
$140,000 
$120,000 
$100,000 



TAX VOUCHER PROGRAM 
VALUE TO TOWN 



$249,000 



$237,000 



$224,69>~^ $227>772 



$189,420- 



/* $210.000 



$175,890' 

— y- 



>' $182,000 



$173,58fL 



$148.830 



* $108,240 



,<$> ,<f> J<fS ^(XV _£>V ^Qj- 



Cv ,o> .<£> .<& xfc ,CN^ ,c<\ .<* 



SS j j|®'jV J5J 3 



<F> <fr <^° <^ <^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 



35,000 
30,000 
25,000 
20,000 
15,000 
10,000 
5,000 




SENIOR MEALS SERVED 



A^VVVVVVVV 



DOn-Site Lunches DMeals-on-Wheels 



79 



VETERANS SERVICES 

The mission of the Veterans Services Office is to do whatever is necessary to provide 
Andover veterans with benefits, entitlements and services whether they be medical, administrative, 
financial or quality of life. 



The Veterans Services Office provides or coordinates all State and Federal financial, medical 
and administrative benefits to Andover' s 3,000 veterans and their families. 

State Benefits - In 2008, the Office responded to increased Public Assistance requests from 
veterans for fuel, food, housing, burials medical needs and others under Massachusetts General Law 
Chapter 115 (M.G.L. CI 15). The increase for Public Assistance is due to the tightening economy 
and aging veteran population. The Veterans Office began the year with two Public Assistance cases 
and a total of nineteen cases were managed by the office throughout the year culminating in over 
$65,000 disbursed to veterans and their dependents. The Public Assistance program is paid for by 
the Town and reimbursed 75% by the State under M.G.L. CI 15. 

Federal Benefits - Obtaining Federal Benefits for local veterans is a priority in the Office to 
include service-connected disability claim processing. Andover residents receive over $2 million 
dollars in tax-free Federal veterans' benefit dollars annually - mostly through service-connected 
disabilities and widows' pensions. 

The Office also planned and coordinated the patriotic ceremonies in observance of Veterans 
Day, Memorial Day, Flag Day, the anniversary of September 1 1 th and placed over 6,800 flags on the 
graves of veterans buried in Andover. Band concerts and other civic activities during the year were 
also handled by the Veterans Services Office. 

A highlight of 2008 was the completion and dedication of Andover's Korean War Memorial. 
Additionally, the Office was active in the local coordination of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Afghanistan/Iraq "Welcome Home Bonus Program" which pays service members deployed to 
combat zones a $ 1 ,000 bonus and those called to active duty outside combat zones a $500 bonus. A 
focus of the new Veterans' Service Director was to assess the Office record keeping and update 
where possible. An on-going project of compiling Andover Civil War Veteran Records was 
completed in conjunction with the record assessment. The Office documented 715Andover Civil 
War Veterans versus an initial record count of 250. 

Fifty-six Andover veterans died during 2008. These veterans served from WWII through the 
Persian Gulf War. Several of these veterans fought in more than one war. The Director of Veterans 
Services also serves as the Town's Graves Registration and Burial Officer. 



80 



KEY VETERANS SERVICES: 

State Veteran Public Assistance Benefits (Massachusetts General Law C115 / MGL C115) 

Outreach, Intake and Counseling, Public Assistance Disbursements and Semi-Annual Audits 

Federal Veteran Benefits (Veterans Administration / VA) 

Disability Claim Processing, Elderly Aid and Attendance, Health Care, Burial and Widow's Pension 
Processing and Grave Marker Applications 

Graves Registration 

Veteran Funerals, Family Burial Counseling, Necrologies and Records Management for over 7,000 
Veterans (living and deceased) 

Committees and Coordination 

Patriotic Holiday Committee, Elder Services, Red Cross Armed Services Committee and local 
Veterans Groups (The American Legion and Disabled American Veterans) 

Patriotic Programs and Ceremonies 

Memorial Day, Veterans Day, Patriotic Concerts, September 1 l l Remembrance, Annual Veterans 
Luncheon and other 

Memorial Care 

Monument oversight, dedication as needed and Veterans' grave flags (ten cemeteries and over 3,500 
flags) 



81 



ANDOVER VETERANS DEATHS - 2008 



Name 

Rensink. Robert B. 
Pucci, Pasquale J. 
Paquin. Ralph E. 
Reardon. William H. Jr. 
DeRosa. Frank T. 
Sweeney, Joseph C. 
Neaves, Ernest J. 
Ragusa, Philip W. 
Low, Thomas W. 
McCabe, Edwin C. 
Foley, Walter R. 
Battles. John F. 
Caffrey, Andrew A. 
Charewitz. Wellentry 
Sweeney, Terence J. 
Sarao, Carmen A. 
Finn, Ralph M. Sr. 
Doyle, Charles A. 
Wall, Kenneth E. 
Mills, Bert H. 
O'Hare, Francis C. 
Ellis, Charles A. Jr. 
Thomas, Jeffrey P. 
Reed, Albert H. 
Covey, Kenneth A. 
Ronan, W T illiam A. 
Daniels, Muriel A. 
Pingree, Peter D. 



Branch 


Service Era 


USCGR 


Peacetime 


Army 


WWII & Korea 


USMC 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


Vietnam 


.Army 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Navy 


W r WII 


Army 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


Vietnam 


Navy 


WWII 


Air Force 


Korea 


Army Air Corps 


wwn 


Army Air Corps 


WWII 


Navy 


wwn 


Navy 


WWII 


Army 


Vietnam 


Navy 


WWII 


USMC 


Vietnam 


.Army 


Korea 


Navy 


wwn 


Arm}" 


Korea & Vietnam 



82 



Name 

Thomson, Donald G. 
Wheeler, Richard L. 
Frost, Norman C. 
Charland, Paul R. 
Murray, James E. 
Gordon, Walter 
Misenti, Joseph 
Hammond, Edward E. Jr. 
McLaughlin, Vincent J. 
Vogel, Seymour H. 
White, Edward 
Barron, William E. 
Lawrence, Dorothy E. 
Buntin, Henry 
Kruse, John R. 
Mosher, David A. 
Darling, Marshall J. 
Lavoi, Joseph W. 
Cregg, Donald J. 
Naehle, Henry E. 
Reddish, Robert L. 
McNamara, Paul E. 
Lowe, George E. 
Russell, William H. 
Johnson, Carlton O. 
Driscoll, Joseph G. 
Hazen, Curtis III 
Thomson, Robert L. 



Branch 




Service Era 


Army 


WWII 


Air Force 




Vietnam 


Navy 




Vietnam 


Navy 




Korea 


Army 




Vietnam 


Navy & Air Force 


Korea & Vietnam 


Navy 




WWII 


Navy 




WWII & Korea 


Army 




Korea 


Army Air 


Corps 


WWII 


Army Air 


Corps 


WWII 


USCG 




Peacetime 


Navy 




WWII 


Army 




WWII 


Navy 




WWII 


Army 




Korea 


Army 




Vietnam 


Army Air 


Corps 


WWII (POW) 


Navy 




WWII 


Army Air 


Corps 


WWII 


Navy 




Korea 


Navy 




WWII 


Army 




WWII 


Navy 




WWII 


Army 




WWII 


Navy 




WWII 


ArmyNG 




Peacetime 


Army 




WWII 



DIVISION OF YOUTH SERVICES 

The A YS aims to provide young people useful experiences to promote healthy growth and 
development. It is our goal to build a network of affordable, accessible, safe, and challenging 
youth programs that appeal and respond to the diverse interests of young adolescents and their 
families. 



Andover Youth Services (AYS) was established to address the need for an increase in 
recreational, educational, social and support programs for the middle school and high school 
populations within the community. AYS supplies the youth of Andover with programs, services, 
and activities throughout the year. AYS provides a direct link that connects youth to their 
community. Andover' s young people face many challenges and it is our mission to develop and 
maintain a program that has the ability to be flexible and encourages all youth to use their 
creativity and spontaneity in positive ways. 

The support piece of AYS has continued to flourish with an increase in the community 
service program, our after school adventure-based program, drop in and flexible office hours, 
court-related services, volunteer and intern opportunities, hospital visits, referrals, college and 
employment, recommendations, fundraising for youth programs, crisis intervention, outreach, 24 
hour emergency response, parent support and education, discussion groups and specialized in- 
school groups. 

AYS events provided a community venue for young people to expose their creative 
talents. The 10 th annual Keep It Wild Fashion Show, Paul King 24-Hour Skate-a-thon and 
numerous concerts and dances attracted thousands of youth and presented unique entertainment 
opportunities for the Town of Andover. 

It is essential to connect with other people, groups and systems already working with 
young people. Andover Youth Services remains dedicated to establishing a community-wide 
network of supportive services for young people. AYS worked directly with the following 
organizations, creating and implementing policy, action items, fundraising, and advocacy for 
youth. Each of the following groups concentrates on developing programs, services and 
outreach to those young people who are not connected positively to the community of Andover: 
Andover Youth Council, Andover Youth Foundation, Friends of Andover Youth, Andover 
Community Advocates for Resources, Education and Support (CARES), Gender Equity 
Committee and AMC Youth Opportunities Program (YOP). 

AYS receives ideas and concepts directly from the young people themselves and then 
takes these ideas and empowers the youth to make them happen. By interacting alongside young 
people, whether it is handing out flyers or working towards a new Youth Center, the programs 
the Youth Services creates and implements are immediate reflections of what the youth want and 
need. By staying true to our philosophy, AYS will continue to provide a diverse range of 
activities, events, groups, and programs for all young people of Andover. 



84 



AYS PROGRAMS 

The Andover Youth Services Program - Freestyle - May to August 

Freestyle was an eight-week program open to all Andover youth eleven to eighteen years of 
age. Young people at these ages are in transition from childhood to adulthood and are in 
various stages of cognitive, physical, emotional, social and moral development. They need 
guidance and support through this stage of self-discovery, expanding horizons and emerging 
independence. AYS understands their developmental needs and responds with a lineup of 
activities, clinics, adventures, field trips and community service opportunities that appeal to 
the individual interests of young people. Over 1,600 young people received a chance to 
express themselves and share their experiences in a positive, supporting environment. The 
program offered 78 trips, adventures and services and encouraged them to participate and 
experience activities that were new, diverse and challenging. 

Ultimate Frisbee - Year round 

On the youth level, middle school boys and girls learned the multiple throws, offense and 
defense strategies and other skills in this fast-paced sport. The team competed in a huge 
tournament in Amherst, MA and a few games against neighboring communities. 
Additionally, AYS continued its support of the high school ultimate team which does not fall 
under the athletic budget. Ultimate involves over 140 kids each Spring. 

Field Hockey - Summer - Fall 
AYS continued to expand a middle school girls field hockey team that competed against 
neighboring towns and brought high school students into a mentoring role by providing 
instruction on stick-handling, passing and other elements of the game. 

Wrestling - November - March 

This year marked the return of varsity wresting to Andover High. AYS has funded the team 
for the last three years and they had a full varsity schedule this season. The youth program 
continued to flourish and there were over 100 wrestlers between the two age groups. 

■ Basketball, Open Gym - Year round 

In the AYS tradition of taking new ideas and generating them into programs, a street hockey 
program, Open Gym and AYS High School Summer Basketball League became instant 
successes. Open gym provided a similar pick up atmosphere for high school basketball 
players. 

Andover Snowboard Club and Learn-to-Ride - December to April 

The Andover Snowboard Club is a group of skiers and riders who share the love for the 
snow. This year we traveled to Sunday River, Pats Peak and Jay Peak. The Learn-to-Ride 
program continued to introduce kids to the joy of snowboarding. Experience riders were 
given the chance to develop their skills further as a part of the advanced session. 

Lacrosse - Year round 

Since 1997, AYS has continued to expand Andover' s lacrosse program. The youth league 
experienced an overwhelming increase in enrollment and additional youth teams were added 



85 



for both girls and boys. AYS implemented several Summer lacrosse programs due to the 
overwhelming demand for year-round lacrosse. Youth Services produced successful 
beginners programs for youths ages 8-10 and pick-up leagues for middle school boys and 
girls who wanted to improve their skills or learn the sport for the first time. Lacrosse has 
been a year-round effort offering clinics, introductory sessions, and pick up sessions. AYS 
continues to support this growing program by sustaining year-round fundraising efforts, 
recruiting coaches and volunteers. 

• Afterschool Programs - September to June 

Flag Football, Field Hockey, Street Hockey, Rock Climbing, Spring Open Gym, Ultimate 
Frisbee, Rugby, Middle School Intramurals, Track program, Volleyball program, Outing 
Club, Bowling Club, etc. 

Vacation Day Programs - September to June 

Developed a variety of program opportunities during the holidays and vacation days for 
middle school and high school students. 

SUPPORT SERVICES - Year round 

~ Community Service - The willingness of young people to serve their community was 
demonstrated thoroughly over the course of the community service days. The young people 
enthusiastically helped community trails by dragging huge logs and boards to build a bog 
bridge, clearing brush and dead trees to create a new trail, and hacking through brush to 
reclaim an overgrown trail. On another service day we helped out at the Franciscan Center, 
clearing brush and restoring a peace garden. The energy of the youth was focused in a 
manner that verified that young people can make a visible difference in their community. 

~ Expeditions - Offers a variety of challenging activities for young men and women. We 
create a powerful group by forming trust and building strong friendships/ relationships. The 
young people are challenged mentally, physically, and socially. By participating in this 
group, the youth will develop vital self-confidence that will carry into every aspect of their 
lives and community. 

~ Drop in and flexible office hours 

~ Court-related services 

~ Volunteer and intern opportunities 

~ Hospital visits 

~ Referrals 

~ Employment network 

~ College and employment recommendations 

~ Fundraising for Youth programs 

~ Crisis intervention - Outreach 

~ 24-hour emergency response 

~ Parent support and education 

~ Discussion groups - Specialized in-school groups 

~ Transportation 



86 



EVENTS 

Keep it Wild Fashion Show - December to June 

The 10 th annual Keep It Wild Fashion Show provided 20 designers and over 80 models a 
venue to expose their creative talents. Over the course of six months, student designers 
attend clinics, have fabric shopping days, eventually sew outfits and recruit models to 
showcase their work. The magnitude of the show requires that the Town House be 
transformed into an atmosphere of style and fashion with pulsing music and a 1 00 foot 
runway. Five hundred people turned out for this unique June event. 

Other Events 

Making Connections 
Service Club annual barbeque 

Concerts/Shows - Year round 

AYS collaborates with a variety of young people who are interested in putting on 
concerts, dances and special shows. Each show has its own particulars and on average 
one to two shows are produced per month. 

ANDOVER COMMUNITY SKATE PARK - May to December 

The Andover Community Skate Park, a positive and safe environment, is open to all ages 
and abilities. It promotes and encourages individual expression and learning. The Park 
provides a positive atmosphere centered around respect for other and, most importantly, 
fun. 

2008 was a special year that saw the dream of a 24-hour skate-a-thon become a reality. 
This annual event was developed to honor Paul King, an avid skater who passed away in 
a skydiving accident. The event, 24 hours of skating, contests, music, art, food and, in 
the evening hours, movies and camping, honored an excellent member and raised over 
$80,000 towards a new ramp in his name. 

The Park continued to play an influential role for AYS. Aside from normal hours of 
operation, many young people had the opportunity to participate in skateboarding lessons 
and clinics. High School mentors instructed youth on the various skateboarding tricks 
and ramp riding techniques. The ACSP hosted two professional skateboard 
demonstrations over the Summer with 400 spectators at each demo. 

NETWORKING AND ADVOCACY - Year round 

It is essential to connect with other people, groups and systems already working with 
young people. Andover Youth Services is dedicated to establishing a community-wide network 
of supportive services for young people. AYS worked directly with the following organizations, 
creating and implementing policy, action items, fundraising, and advocacy for youth. Each of 
the following groups concentrates on developing programs, services and outreach to those young 
people who are not connected positively to the Andover community. 



87 



- Andover Youth Council 

AYS operates directly with the Andover Youth Council. The council is comprised of 
thirteen high school students. The mission of the Youth Council is to advocate for all youth 
and to bring more services pertaining to issues relevant to their lives. The goal is to empower 
Andover' s young people by getting them involved with community organizations, schools 
and Town government in order to create opportunities for youth. The council has become an 
official part of the Town structure and their office is located within the Town Offices. 

■ Andover Youth Foundation, Inc. 

A non-profit corporation organized to undertake the construction of a Youth Center. 

■ Andover Community Advocates for Resources, Education and Support (CARES) 

Andover CARES is dedicated to supporting life affirming choices, fostering resiliency and 
increasing a sense of belonging in the community. 

■ AMC Youth Oppportunities Program (YOP) 

The Appalachian Mountain Club Youth Opportunities Program helps youth workers and 
youth-serving agencies offer educational and recreational outdoor opportunities for their 
youth. The AMC encourages the involvement of all people in its mission and activities and 
their goal is to be a community which is comfortable, inviting, and accessible for people of 
any age, gender, race, religion, ethnicity, ability, sexual orientation or socioeconomic status. 

ADMINISTRATION 

Hiring, supervising and training seasonal, part-time staff and volunteers. 



88 



TOWN COUNSEL 



During 2008, Town Counsel made numerous appearances before State Courts and 
Administrative Boards. Formal legal opinions were researched and rendered to Town officials. 
Court challenges to decisions by the Town's boards and commissions were defended by Town 
Counsel. 

Town Counsel had conferences with the Town Manager and other Town officials on 
almost a daily basis. Town Counsel reviewed all warrant articles, drafted many of them, and 
attended all Town Meetings. Advice was given to Town officials and to Town Meeting on the 
legal basis for warrant articles. During the period covered by this report, contracts were drawn 
and reviewed and numerous deeds, easements, releases and agreements were drafted and 
recorded. 

Several requests for public records were reviewed and discussed with the Office of the 
Commonwealth's Supervisor of Public Records. Substantial effort went into negotiating and 
obtaining a Conservation Restriction upon property known as the Sellers Farm. Advice was 
rendered to Town employees and officials regarding the State Conflict of Interest Law. 

Consultation occurred with the Department of Revenue and Office of the Inspector 
General on a regular basis regarding financial transactions and procurement practices. Various 
deed restrictions and regulatory agreements were reviewed for affordable housing and 
comprehensive permit projects. 



89 



ANNUAL REPORT 

2008 

ANDOVER SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Andover Public Schools, in partnership with the community, is to provide students 
with the knowledge, skill, and qualities required to be successful in a diverse society. 

The State of the Schools 

During the 2008 calendar year the School Department was able to address important academic areas, due 
largely to a modest increase in the school budget and also through funds secured through gifts and 
donations from private organizations and through our active pursuit of federal, state and private grants. 

During the three previous school years (2005-06, 2006-07. and 2007-08) the School Department had been 
able to restore positions lost in 2003-04. The restorations" included: 



Elementary Schools 


Middle Schools 


Andover High School 


• health teachers 


• social studies teacher 


• assistant principal 


• some PE teachers 


• health teacher 


• 2 program advisors 


• 3 r Grade instrumental music 


• music teachers 


• social studies teacher 


• nurse, counselor time and 


• guidance counselor 


• music teacher 


reading specialists 




• social worker 

• assistant track coaches, and teacher 
stipends for school clubs 



In past years the School Department made trade-offs in order to address our primary' goal of preparing our 
students for the global workplace. Some examples: 1) Mandarin Chinese instead of adding Spanish or 
French sections, 2) Middle School engineering program, instead of adding to the music program, 3) 
Additional Assistant Principal at the high school to address the growing high school population, instead 
of replacing a Program Advisor. 

We have not restored many positions lost in 2003, including at the high school: dance teacher, 2 
custodians; at the middle schools: 2 foreign language, 1 music, 2 technology and 1 integrated arts 
teachers and 1 guidance counselor; and at the elementary schools: 2 assistant principals, 5 PE, 1 music, 
part time librarian, 3 custodians. We have not restored staffing reductions in the Adaptive PE program. 
Supply budgets were larger FY2002 than in 2009, and over 50 stipends that provided support in the core 
curriculum to students and teachers remain un-restored. 

This report is primarily an update on the status of the 2008 school year, but it also includes the following 
summary of the fiscal situation in the first three months of 2009. The Preliminary FY2010 School Budget 
reflects a $3.2 million shortfall and includes reductions that un-do much of the restorations we brought 
back in recent years. The FY2010 preliminary budget contains the following program and/or staffing 
reductions that we are making to date: 



Through the successful efforts of our Grants Coordinator, the district has received the following grant awards: 
Teaching American History for $998,000 over three years (27% going directly to Andover), Reading Recovery 
grant of $24,546; Extended Learning grant (feasibility study) for $1 1,000; and STEM Pipeline Fund grant of 

399,974 (41% going directly to Andover). Several other grants are pending. 

Two positions above that were not restorations were the middle school social studies teacher and the high school 
assistant principal. The social studies teacher addressed a staffing inequity among the middle schools and the 
assistant principal position addressed the fact that the high school has grown by over 350 students in the last 10 
years (from 1 ,4 1 4 students in 1 997 to 1 ,757 in 2007). 90 
3 We have added sections in all subjects over the last 10 years due to the high school growth. 



Elementary Schools 


Middle Schools 


Andover High 


Central 
Office/District 


• Health (4) 


• Physical Education 


• Science 


• 25% custodial 


• Physical Education (2, 


• World Languages 


• Math 


reduction (10) 


with reductions in 


• Library Services (3) 


• English 


• Administration (1) 


Kindergarten and 5 th 


• Guidance (4) 


• Technology/Busines 


• Independents (2) 


grade) 
• 3 rd Grade instrumental 


• Special Education (3) 

• Integrated Arts 


s 
• Social Studies 


• Clerical (3) 


music (2) 
• Instructional Assistant 




• Physical Education 

• Instructional 




time (equal to 1 1 
positions) 




Assistants (2) 





The Preliminary Budget also 
fees (bus, athletics, clubs and 



includes increases in all day kindergarten and preschool tuitions and user 
after school activities). 



Enrollment 

The 2008 enrollment in our six elementary schools showed modest growth over the last year with 2,893 
students as of October 1, 2008, compared to 2,885 students in 2007. The middle schools, at 1,513 in 2008 
compared to 1,473 in 2007, had the largest gain (40 students). Perhaps due to a relatively small senior 
class of 390 (compared to 437, 444, and 450 in the other three grades), there was a small enrollment 
downturn at the high school from 1,739 in 2007 to 1,721 in 2008. Even so, the enrollment at the high 
school is well above the 1,404 population in 1997, and the school remains overcrowded. Districtwide the 
enrollment increased by 30 students. Our district continues to grow, even as many towns and cities are 
losing students due to migration out of the state. Early enrollment projections indicate the enrollment 
could increase by approximately 90 students in 2010. 

Sch ool facilities: 

The School Department continues to focus on the physical condition and capacity of our school facilities. 
At Bancroft there are structural building concerns, and at Shawsheen, South, West Elementary and the 
High School there is need for additional space, especially for special needs services. Chaired by Mark 
Johnson, a Task Force produced an initial report to the School Committee and Selectmen in spring 2007, 
and based on that report and supported by the two boards, drafted three Statements of Interest (SOI) to the 
Massachusetts School Building Authority (MSBA) to request financial support from the State for 
substantial improvements for three schools: Bancroft, Shawsheen and the High School. MSBA then 
directed us to select the one school that had the most urgent needs. Given the structural and space needs, 
the obsolete open-space concept, and the high cost of on-going maintenance, we reported to the MSBA 
that Bancroft was the school most in need of major repair or replacement. In fall and winter 2007 MSBA 
announced that Bancroft qualified for a feasibility study, a first step in the process to receive State support 
to renovate or replace a school building. In 2008 the Town Manager appointed a School Building 
Committee, and Town Meeting voted to provide funding for the Feasibility Study. 4 That study is now 
underway with the Building Committee reviewing possible sites for a new Bancroft, appointing Joe 
Piantedosi our Owner's Project Manager, and looking into the possibility of a building project that would 
include both Bancroft and Shawsheen. As directed by MSBA, the school department submitted 
"refreshed" SOIs for Shawsheen and the High School. 

Sch ool A dmin istration : 

The School Department's administrative team in 2008 underwent substantial change. At the start of 2008 
Assistant Principal Steve Murray became West Middle's new principal when Dr. Denise Holmes 
announced that she would be retiring mid-year for medical reasons. In the spring Dr. Colleen McBride 
replaced retiring Principal Dr. Eileen Woods at South; Assistant Principal Liz Roos moved up to the 
position of principal at West Elementary to replace retiring Principal Charlie Friel; Francine Goldstein 



4 Reimbursement from the State for the Feasibility Study and any resulting construction for Andover schools would 
be approximately 41% with additional reimbursements p&iible for our maintenance record and incorporating 
"green" solutions into building plans. 



became the Interim Principal when Bancroft Principal Scott Morrison announced his resignation in late 
spring. In the Central Office, the School Committee approved the appointments of Dr. Susan Nicholson 
to the position of permanent Assistant Superintendent and David Keniston to the position of Business 
Administrator to replace Bernie Tuttle who had come out of retirement to serve as Interim Business 
Administrator for the 2007-08 school year. 

The first cohort of Salem State's The Institute for Leadership Education (T.I.L.E.) program (which 
included four Andover teachers) graduated with administrative licensure in spring 2008 and the second 
cohort began its studies with 8 Andover teachers enrolled. We continue to embark on aggressive 
recruitment and retention programs for both teachers and administrators at a time when there are 
shortages of both, and to that end for four years have joined with 14 other districts in hosting the annual 
Merrimack Valley Recruitment Fair. The fourth fair was held in February 2009 to which over 500 
teachers and administrators attended. In 2008 we secured the services of retired Dr. Woods to oversee 
our teacher induction and mentoring program, and to expand our administrator mentoring program (a 
critical need given the number of new administrators coming into the district). 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE AND CENTRAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 

The five elected members of the School Committee typically met twice monthly during 2008. Dennis 
Forgue was elected in March 2008 to replace Dr. Dave Samuels who did not seek re-election. In April Dr. 
Arthur Barber stepped down as Chair, replaced by Attorney Debra Silberstein. Dr. Tony James was 
elected secretary. During fall 2008 the School Committee completed its evaluation of the Superintendent 
approved the Superintendent's goals for 2008-09. and approved the District Goals and Objectives for the 
2008-2009 and 2009-2010 school years. The Committee approved the 2008-09 District Improvement Plan 
and secured the consultation services of Lyle Kirtman of Future Management Systems in the development 
of a long term strategic plan, a process that will begin July 2009. 

The School Committee held work sessions during summer 2008 to discuss the 2009-2010 budget, and 
continued collective bargaining with employee units who had not completed negotiations. The Chairs, 
Town Manager and Superintendent met throughout the fall and w inter to review budget assumptions and 
discuss the budget shortfall. 

Assistant Superintendent of Schools 
Curriculum and Instruction 

The focus of curriculum in 2008 continued to be on the implementation of the Balanced Literacy Model 
and the expansion of the Middle School EngineeringTechnology Program into our third Middle School. 
The focus of instruction in 2008 continued to be on Differentiated Instruction at both the elementary and 
middle school levels. In particular, the middle school science teachers requested and were granted 
professional development in differentiated instruction in their content area. Middle School math 
continued to be monitored throughout the school year. The work of the assistant superintendent, the 
principals, teacher leaders, and the curriculum councils has continued to focus on program revisions, 
textbook adoptions, and instructional technology needs. 

Assessment 

Students in grades one through eleven participated in local assessments to evaluate their learning in 
mathematics. English/Language Arts. Science, and Social Studies. The Massachusetts Comprehensive 
Assessment System (MCAS) was administered to students in grades three through ten and the 
performance of Andover students was recognized in the Boston Globe and local newspapers. The Boston 
Globe recognized the outstanding performance of our students on MCAS at several grade levels. Doherty 
Middle School was ranked first in the state in Grade 7 ELA and sixth in Grade 8 ELA. Andover West 
Middle School was ranked first in the state for Grade 8 ELA scores. Andover High School had the 
following passing rates: ELA, 99, math, 98, and science, 97. Schools at the elementary level did well 
across various grade levels in reading, math, and science. The English Language Arts and the Math 
Curriculum Councils have been gathering data this year in order to conduct a program review of Balanced 
Literacy K-2 and Middle School Math. Members of each council have been looking at data, examining 
the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and theoAvndover benchmarks. Similarly, there is an ongoing 
review of the Expeditionary Learning Program at Wood Hill Middle School. Teachers, administrators. 



and the assistant superintendent have been meeting regularly to gather both quantitative and qualitative 
data in order to present a report on Expeditionary Learning. 

Professional Development 

District Professional Development focused on supporting the classroom teacher in the delivery of 
instruction as well as meeting state and federal training mandates. The school district offered and teachers 
participated in professional development on differentiated instruction, DRA training K-5, Response to 
Intervention, Everyday Math in grades K and 4, curriculum mapping, college courses for elementary 
science teachers, data analysis workshops, restraint training, and English Language Learner training. A 
significant number of school employees participated in summer, fall, and spring courses that were offered 
in the school district. Additionally, all of our new teachers participated in our New Teacher Orientation 
program for three days in August. 

Business Office 

The responsibilities of the Business Office include managing financial operations and selected support 
services; developing the annual budget, managing the annual budget, processing payables and payroll, 
labor contract negotiation and compliance, purchasing, fee collection, financial reporting, development of 
the Capital Improvement Plan and grant management. The Business Office, which includes the Copy 
Center, works with the entire school system and many Town Departments. In addition to financial 
oversight, the Business Office is responsible for facilities management (in cooperation with the Plant and 
Facilities Department), student transportation, school and district emergency management, custodial 
services and food services. 

Human Resources Office 

The human resource office continues to work on making its operations more efficient. This year, it has 
been instrumental in working with a focus group to bring substantial organizational changes to the school 
department webpage. We are also in the process of implementing an applicant tracking program for both 
town and school. We continue to aggressively explore ways that technology can help with our work. The 
human resources office played a key role in helping employees and retirees understand health insurance 
options, plan changes, and flexible savings accounts by holding multiple small group meetings to insure 
successful implementation of these changes. The Andover Public Schools hired several key leadership 
positions last year at the South, Bancroft, West Elementary, West Middle and Doherty Middle Schools. 
Human resources staff played a key role in managing the search process for these positions. The human 
resources department continues to support several training and performance improvement endeavors 
including: customer service training, performance measurement training, teacher and principal licensing 
endeavors. 

REPORTS FROM THE SCHOOLS: 
Andover High School 

Foreign Language 

The Foreign Language Curriculum Council has focused its efforts on reviewing the Middle School 
Language Program with the goal of increasing instructional time in the student's chosen language by 
shortening the current Exploratory Program. This would extend the language sequence and allow students 
to achieve a higher level of proficiency before graduation. A higher level of proficiency is the ultimate 
goal of the department in preparing our students to become global citizens. The other part of becoming a 
global citizen is to broaden student perspectives of other cultures, and in order to do so, we are exploring 
possibilities of establishing "sister schools" and making connections to other schools in places like China, 
Costa Rica, and Africa. The department continues to promote Foreign Language study through a series of 
activities during International Education Week in the fall and National Foreign Language Week in the 
spring. These activities include an International Film Festival, a spelling bee, World Cultures Day, and 
our Cabaret. Finally, we are seeking funding to finance a new updated language lab that will bring us into 
the 21 st century technologically and better allow students to make connections with the world. 

Mathematics Department 

The Mathematics Department implemented a new^-elective in Linear Algebra in 2008-2009. We are 

involved with a grant through the Educational Development Corporation (EDC) to design and pilot this 



course, which is usually a College level course for math majors, for high school students. One of the 
Andover High School math teachers, Stephanie Ragucci is working with EDC in the development of this 
program, implementation at the pilot sites and training of teachers in the content. These opportunities 
help to diversify our elective program and give students an additional opportunity to expand their 
mathematics knowledge. Based on our K-12 Curriculum Council work, on data analysis of MCAS results 
and internal assessment, the Mathematics Department continues to revise its curriculum, course offerings, 
and instructional practices. 

Science Department 

The Science Department implemented a single elective in 2008-2009, Introduction to BioTechnology. 
The purpose of this course was to expand the course offerings in science. The award of the BioTeach 
grant made this course a reality. The grant afforded us $10,000 to purchase new equipment and 
supplementary materials for the class. Throughout this year we have evaluated our physics program and 
the way physics will be taught in 2009-2010. Next September, we will be offering AP Physics B. One of 
our teachers attended the AP Institute in St. Johnsbury last summer (2008) and realized that our current 
level one Physics course would be adequate preparation for the AP Physics B exam. Currently, in the 
course catalog are the following physics options: AP Physics C, AP Physics B and a combined Level 1-2 
physics course. The goal of the changes is to make Physics more accessible to a larger group of students. 
We also had four students enrolled in the TEAMS Academy at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. 
This program offers math, engineering, and science courses not traditionally found in most high schools. 
Two teachers also took part in this program by acting as the faculty for two of the four courses, Steve 
Sanborn and Michael Doherty. 

Social Studies Department 

In 2008 Andover was able to restore the Social Studies Program Advisor position. Rebecca Ledig began 
that job on July 1 st . The department hired three new teachers for the 2008-2009 school year (Matt Bach, 
Chris Farina, and Colette Berard). Teachers worked in the summer on curriculum development for 20 th 
Century, Psychology, Contemporary World Issues, 10 n Grade Connections, Democracy and Media 
Literacy, and AP Euro. Two teachers in our department (Michael McCarthy and Rebecca Ledig) traveled 
to China on a grant during the summer with Global Alliance to study WWII in Asia. They developed 
lesson plans and shared their experiences with the department. In August, Michelle Chachus was awarded 
the Picturing America grant by The National Endowment for the Humanities. This grant brings "high 
quality reproductions of notable American art into public schools... and uses art as a catalyst for the study 
of America." The department introduced a new course this school year called Exploring Global Religions 
after over a year of preparation. Nine teachers in the department are participating in the Teaching 
American History grant program under the direction of the department's own Lauren Ream and 
University of Massachusetts at Lowell. Lauren and the teachers participating continue to bring new ideas 
and strategies to the department. Annie McGuire is working with Melanie Cutler of the science 
department to develop an interdisciplinary course called Environmental Action. This course will be 
offered to juniors and seniors for the 2009-2010 school year. 

English Department 

The English Department at AHS continued to refine curriculum documents, to clarify expectations of 
students through the use of rubrics, and to implement changes in curriculum that were developed during 
summer months. In 2008 our 10 th graders performed well once again on the English Language Arts 
MCAS. We met our AYP goal and continue to use test data to strengthen curriculum and instruction. 
During the summer of 2008 nearly all department members participated in professional 
development/curriculum activities, three focus areas being analysis of PSSS results, the expansion of our 
Advanced Placement program, and the development of a summer reading initiative. Several teachers 
examined the reading and language results of the PSSS which had been given to 9 th graders in March. 
Three teachers attended AP workshops in St. Johnsbury, VT, and are teaching AP this year, as a record 
number of students are taking the AP Literature and Composition course in 12 th grade. Teachers 
representing every grade and all of the elective courses participated in the development of a formal 
summer reading program to begin in the summer of 2009. Under the leadership of Jennifer Arundale, 
participating teachers read and chose summer reading titles and developed accompanying reading guides 
for each course offered by the department. Our plan is to build a community of readers, have a common 



title with which to frame discussions at the start of each semester, and to use common reading to get a 
writing sample from students at the start of the upcoming school year. The English Department has four 
new staff people for the current year, and an ELA Program Advisor is in place. 

Visual Arts 

The Fine Arts Department in 2008 serviced nearly 1500 students during the year. Fourteen students in 
Portfolio enrolled in college art programs after graduation. Colleges attending are RISD, Pratt, Art 
Institute of Boston, Massachusetts College of Art, University of Mass. at Amherst and Lowell, 
Framingham State, Maine College of Art, New Hampshire Institute of Art, California College of Arts, 
Northern Essex Community College and Trinity College. Community based art exhibits included, "Main 
Street Memories" exhibit at the Andover Historical Society as well as their annual student art show in 
May. The Greater Lawrence Educational Collaborative - GLEC - Arts Show at the Lawrence Heritage 
State Park. Maxwell Nolan was selected to Art All State in 2008. The department submitted 21 works 
and 4 Portfolios to the National Scholastics Arts Awards and eight students were recognized with awards; 
2 gold keys, 4 silver keys and 2 honorable mentions. Several students participated in "Senior Exhibition" 
night with individual art and photography portfolios of work and one permanent mural was created in the 
cafeteria. Art club had a successful year creating secret postcards and silk screening projects. 

Counseling Department 

The Counseling Department was pleased to welcome Pamela Kerrigan as the new member of the AHS 
Counseling Team. This past May, Ms. Kerrigan earned her Masters of Science in Applied Educational 
Psychology with a Focus on School Counseling from Northeastern University. Ms. Kerrigan came to us 
with outstanding recommendations after completing a Guidance Counseling Internship Program at 
Brookline High School. During the first semester of the school year, the Counseling Department worked 
diligently with seniors on the college application process. It is important to note that 35% of the seniors 
(185 students) applied to colleges under the early decision/early action admission deadlines. As of 
February 1 st , 2924 transcript requests have been processed of which approximately 2000 were completed 
by December 15 th . Early admission results were encouraging and included acceptances from Bentley 
College, Boston College, Boston University, Duke University, Georgetown University, Johns Hopkins 
University, the University of North Caroline at Chapel Hill, Northeastern University, Tufts University 
and Worcester Polytechnic Institute. During the second semester counselors will guide the 
underclassmen through the course selection process as well as working closely with the juniors through 
the initial stages of career and post-secondary planning. 

Middle Schools 
Doherty Middle School 

Doherty Middle School is a school house comprised of students, staff, and administrators who hold 
academic excellence in student achievement in highest esteem as our primary goal We continue to create 
and nurture a culture of reflection, conversation, collaboration and commitment to continuous 
improvement. Teachers in all three grades have made significant gains in adopting the following literacy 
strategies: sustained silent reading, encouraging students to use active reading strategies in answering test 
questions (MCAS and teacher tests), and teachers from all disciplines participated in summer workshops 
on differentiation. The Engineering initiative took hold last year, resulting in the adoption of a popular 
Engineering & Design program offered to all students in grades six, seven, and eight. In addition, changes 
were made to enhance our math supports (e.g., math extensions enrichment and piloting accelerated 
math). This year we added math strategies enrichment, broadened the ACC math and MCAS Academy. 
Through professional development opportunities, the mathematics teachers continued to improve their 
instructional techniques when working with those students who struggle in mathematics as well as those 
who move swiftly through the curriculum. We used data (MCAS, common assessments and grade level 
assessments) to back up the instructional needs of our students and provided teachers tools/data to 
individualize education and learning goals for children in strengthening academic progress. Science 
teachers from the three middle schools in Andover participated in the NORTHEAST NETWORK STEM 
FELLOWS and LEADERS Capstone Project Showcase in 2008-2009. A 7 th grade teacher represented 
Doherty as a two-year Fellow in this STEM (S9i&nce, Technology, Engineering, & Math) Pipeline 



Project, partnering closely with Raytheon engineers who assisted in her Science Enrichment labs. In 
appreciating diversity in our community we designed curriculum connections with our new 'Hall of 
Flags. ' This is where flags were prominently displayed in the hallway leading to our library, 
representing/celebrating those 22 different countries where students and staff were born. We will use our 
trip to China this year as a springboard for learning about global differences and have set up a new China 
enrichment elective. And finally, we created a Language Based Program to service students with 
special needs, inviting them to remain at their neighborhood school in a substantially separate setting, 
rather than at an out-of-district placement. This program is designed to meet the needs of students who 
require intensive, connected instruction, with an emphasis on individually designed instruction in core 
academics and reading, adhering to the Massachusetts Frameworks. 

West Middle School 

West Middle School is committed to the core values of Turning Points 2000 and Educating Adolescents 
in the 21 s ' Century . Our staff has been examining how teaching for deeper understanding leads to 
evidence of student learning and achievement, engaging students in learning experiences that are 
applicable to both what they are doing now and what they will be doing in the future. The result of this 
work for our teachers has been greater collaboration and more discussion and implementation of 
interdisciplinary work, leading to a richer and more engaging experience for both teachers and students. 
One overarching goal for Turning Points is ensuring success for every student. Our belief in the 
importance of this goal is evidenced by the addition of our new Excel program. This new program, 
combined with our continued focus on teaming and inclusion, has resulted in a number of innovative 
activities for all of our students. Leading these endeavors are new additions to our staff in administration, 
as well as in our social studies, language arts and special education departments. These combined efforts 
have created a building climate that is focused, supportive, and light-hearted. Special events such as our 
Flocking Flamingo Fundraiser, Going Green efforts, and school community celebrations have energized 
our staff and students. We are very grateful to our parent community for their continued support. 

Wood Hill Middle School 

At Wood Hill Middle School we are asking our students to "Look Inside." This request corresponds to 
our belief of continuous search for improvement. At Wood Hill, we challenge teachers to implement 
cutting edge practices for all learners and have developed in internal and external support for teachers 
through Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound. Our on-going work with Expeditionary Learning brings 
us the well researched practices and nationally recognized professional development. This year, teams 
and teachers have implemented expeditions such as The Election, Qualities of a Leader, Early Man, and 
World Carnival. A Team of Teachers presented their work at the National Conference in March. All 
teachers have worked to make cross-curriculum connections, learning targets correspond to assessments, 
high student responsibilities and expectations are more explicit and common place. Expeditionary 
Learning continues to be funded through the generosity of Wakefield Inc., the Andona Society, private 
donors, and local fundraising. Also this year, we have been able to support the engineering position and 
this has been a natural fit with process based learning. We are excited about the road traveled here at 
Wood Hill and look forward to the never ending learning journey ahead. 

Elementary Schools 
Bancroft Elementary School 

While Bancroft School was subjected to significant change in 2008, the strong sense of community that 
marks our school remained constant. The open design of Bancroft School reflects a community that 
opens its doors and its heart to others. This was evident in 2008 as we continued to nurture strong 
partnerships with the Andover Senior Center, the Andover Rotary Club, Doherty Middle School, and 
Phillips Academy. Through these partnerships, our children benefited from the expertise and commitment 
of others. Their presence at Bancroft enhances the already excellent education afforded to all Andover 
children. Bancroft School did experience some change in 2008. On July 1, Francine Goldstein became 
the interim principal, filling the spot vacated by Scott Morrison. Additionally, a School Building 
Committee was formed in June, 2008 to study the physical needs of the Bancroft School and explore 
options for renovation or replacement. The Bancroft Community has grown and elementary education 
has changed dramatically since the school opened itf $oors in 1969. Now, almost 40 years later, there is a 
need for additional building space. Additionally, because of its design, Bancroft is costly to maintain. As 



a result, the School Building Committee is exploring its options, including renovation and re-building. 
Information about the building project as well as the many initiatives and events at Bancroft School can 
be found on the newly formed PTO website: www . bancroftpto .or g . 

High Plain Elementary School 

In keeping with the 40 n anniversary of the first landing on the moon, the High Plain Community selected 
'One Small Step... On the Journey of Learning" as its theme for the new school year. The words of 
John F. Kennedy resonated with the High Plain staff and inspired their goals for the year. "We choose to 
go to the moon, not because it is easy, but because it is hard and will serve to organize and measure the 
best of our energies and skills. The challenge is one we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to 
postpone, and one which we intend to win.'" After participating in a year long study regarding the 
feasibility of an expanded learning day, it was decided to defer the decision to apply for a Massachusetts 
DESE implementation grant. Parent and staff Expanded Learning Time surveys and focus groups did 
however highlight the need to further enhance 21 st century study for our learners. Toward that goal, High 
Plain expanded its before and after school academic enrichment program to establish Learning Leaps. 
Created on a three term basis, Learning Leaps offers a diverse catalogue of academic, beyond the school 
day, offerings for grades K-5 providing - Mandarin Chinese, Spanish, Fine Arts studio classes, Advanced 
Math and Science workshops, in addition to chess, music, after school sports, HEP TV production, and a 
Stock Market Club. We hope to continue to grow these offerings based on our staff and parent volunteer 
instructors. Parents continue to be vital partners throughout our classrooms. Our parents sustain ELF 
(Environmental Learning for the Future) for all K-5 classes, our Literacy Coalition providing weekly one- 
on-one reading support for Gr. K-2, and Everyday Math games to build skills and confidence. This year 
Parent Coffees were conducted for each grade with our counselors, grade level staff and principal to 
discuss the developmental characteristics and social/emotional development of the grade. Our goal was 
to strengthen the home-school partnership and to provide parents with helpful strategies. This year we 
also established a mentoring "Buddies" program between WHMS student volunteers and our K-5 
classrooms. Perhaps the most excitement this year was generated by the PTO's generous donation of four 
interactive SMARTBoards. This 21 st century technology tool has provided a new and engaging pathway 
for student learning and access to vast new resources. As always we thank our parents, community 
volunteers and organizations who contribute so much to learning community and students. 

Henry C. Sanborn Elementary School 

Our Journey to Success is the theme for the year at Sanborn School. In addition to reinforcing Sanborn's 
values embodied by the four R's: Respect, Responsibility, Resourcefulness, and Reflection, we have 
embraced our theme which was chosen based upon the belief that successful people understand their 
talents and build their lives upon them. We have implemented classroom and enrichment activities to 
help the children learn to focus on their strengths by identifying and reflecting upon what they do well 
and expanded opportunities to showcase student work and talents. We continue to foster a love of reading 
in Sanborn students through the Community Read Along, Magic Carpet Reading, our "Explore New 
Worlds on Your Journey to Success" Reading Incentive Program, and a newly implemented monthly 
Literary Genre initiative. We have expanded our partnership with SHED/Kid's Club offering a number of 
their courses, with a science/engineering focus, to our students at Sanborn through our Explorations 
program. These courses included Pinball Mania, Magic, and Gizmos and Gadgets, and nicely 
complemented our other offerings which included courses such as Chinese, Spanish, Math Olympiad, Art 
Expressions, Leadership, Outdoor Games, Cooking, Volleyball, and Yoga. Our students have 
participated in community and civic awareness activities such as a Student Presidential Election, a 
recycling Waste Reduction Week, Walk to School Days and our 30 th Annual Harvest Festival. The 
Sanborn Community, led by our fourth and fifth grade Student Council, participated in a number of 
service projects including Coats for Kids, Turkeys4America, Lazarus House Toy and Food Drives, Jump 
Rope for Heart, a mini-marathon to benefit Dana Farber, and peer tutoring programs. During the summer 
the roof replacement project at Sanborn was completed and signs were added to improve traffic flow. 
Sanborn is currently participating in a Model Classroom Project. Through the installation of a SMART 
Board in one of our fifth grade classrooms, we are integrating current imaging technology throughout the 
curriculum. We appreciate the continued support of our P.T.O. and the entire Andover Community. 

97 



Shawsheen Primary School 

Shawsheen continued to Go Green! Students had a waste free lunch week, using recyclable and reusable 
containers to reduce waste. This trend continues as the students take the responsibilities of emptying the 
recycle bins and crushing milk cartons. First and second grade students practice independence by signing 
up for monthly jobs including watering the plants, feeding the turtles and making the announcements. The 
PTO continues to provide support, materials and cultural events, for which we are very grateful. A 
Smartboard was installed and an effort is underway to fund it and possibly buy more for the school. 
Community Service drives continued, and in April, Shawsheen was recognized for setting a new 
Guinness Book of World Record by 'gathering the largest number of plush toys' (5657!). These toys were 
donated to tutoring programs in Lawrence, libraries, orphanages and hospitals in Belize. To continue our 
effort to conserve, the school-wide theme is Endangered Animals. Shawsheen saw record numbers in 
registrations for K and lotteries were required for both full and half day classes. Staff participated in 
workshops regarding 'Response to Intervention', 'Differentiating Instruction', and 'Data Driven 
Assessment' among other current practices. All of the Shawsheen community appreciates the support of 
the Town of Andover. 

South School 

TEAM SOUTH Belonging promotes self-worth and in turn, an understanding of the value of other 
people. With that as our premise, the South School community adopted the acronym T.E.A.M. (Together 
Everyone Achieves More) to promote the concept that respectful collaboration prepares students for 
cooperative group work in school and undoubtedly, in their future work lives. We've actualized our 
school-wide theme this year... South School Makes a World of Difference — Respecting Ourselves, 
Appreciating Others, and Caring for Our Planet — in many different ways. Honoring Stars of the Day 
for demonstrating outstanding citizenship, implementing a monthly student recognition program, 
Teammate of The Month, that honors each and every student for outstanding academic work, developing 
leadership skills through South Student Councils (Community Service, Spirit, Student Issues), and joining 
together to support the message of our Go Green Committee to reduce, reuse and recycle are great 
examples of how South School makes a positive difference in the greater community. 

West Elementary School 

West Elementary School embraced the theme of "Think Do Succeed" for the 2008-2009 school year. We 
began the school year "thinking" of how to best utilize our PTO auction monies. After much research and 
teacher consensus we purchased four SMART Boards and two new mobile laptop labs. The teachers were 
provided with ample training to implement these new technological teaching tools. Another goal we had 
was to find a way to make several small group connections. We created a math block for all grade 3 and 4 
children. The children have a forty-five minute math lesson in groups of 4-6, utilizing teachers, assistants, 
and administration. In addition we have a fifth grade small group before school tutoring group that is run 
by our literacy team. We expanded our math team to the second and third grades by starting a Continental 
Math League. We now have 150 students participating in an extra 45 minutes of math per week. The 
student council continued to reach out and make connections with the community. The monthly Walk to 
School Day incorporated a different charity each month. West was able to raise $2,500 for the Beverly 
School in Kenya, outfit 400 people with toothbrushes and toothpaste, donate 700 books to Lawrence 
Community Daycare, and collect 489 coats for Coats to Kids Project. In addition, we have grown our 
senior volunteer program to seven very active seniors, as well as doubling our Merrimack Valley Jewish 
Coalition Literacy volunteers. We also celebrate our tradition of all fifth graders having a job from office 
worker, tour guide, courtyard maintenance, student council, STOP transport, and school store. In March, 
West celebrated our 14 th annual WERAWC, West Elementary Readers' and Writers' Conference 
welcoming ten authors, illustrators and storytellers as well as 1,200 parents to hear their own "published" 
children. 

DISTRICT DEPARTMENTS 
Pupil Personnel Department 

Pupil Personnel Administration continued to oversee special education services to approximately 1,000 
identified students between the ages of 3 and 2298 Programs were available to address the needs of 
students with mild to moderate disabilities as well as those with more intensive special needs and multiple 



handicaps. To the extent possible, special education students attended their neighborhood schools and 
participated with their typically developing peers in the general education setting. The Department 
continued its commitment to work with families to retain students in the district (rather than sending them 
to out-of-district programs), and provided consultation, training, and support to in-district staff in order to 
meet the complex needs of some of our students. These efforts have resulted in the establishment of two 
additional new programs at the middle school level this year. First, the EXCEL program at West Middle 
School serves students who present with global delays, providing access to the curriculum through 
academics, functional academics, and lifeskills. Second, the language-based classroom at Doherty Middle 
School provides intensive language remediation and support to students presenting with language-based 
learning disabilities who require extensive curriculum modifications in order to maintain effective 
progress. In addition to the new middle school programs, an existing elementary program at West 
Elementary has been redefined to serve students with autism utilizing the Applied Behavior Analysis 
(ABA) methodology. Finally, the high school now has a program in its infancy that will provide pre- 
vocational, vocational, and community support for students who require those services. In addition to 
supporting our special needs students, the Pupil Personnel Department also continues to oversee programs 
for educating English Language Learners (ELLs). We have continued to train general education staff on 
supporting these students in their classrooms. 

Finally, the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) released its results of our 
Coordinated Program Review, which took place during the 2007-08 school year. The report included two 
commendations (on the array of services provided to support students in a least restrictive environment 
and on principals' understanding of their role in supporting students with disabilities). There were several 
required corrective actions, mostly in the area of English Language Learners, which the Department is 
currently addressing. 

Health Education 

The Andover Health Education Department provides comprehensive health education to the students of 
Andover to increase each student's mental, physical, emotional and social well being. Health Education 
teachers align the curriculum with the Massachusetts Comprehensive Health Curriculum Frameworks 
instituting the sequential and coordinated teaching of health. Health teachers administered the Center for 
Disease Control Youth Risk Behavior Survey to middle school students. Behaviors related to tobacco, 
alcohol and illegal drug use, diet, exercise, violence and mental issues were reported. Community 
network teams such as Andover' s Community Health Advisory Team met to build safe schools. Student 
groups such as Kids for Kids, Peer Leadership and Student's Against Destructive Decisions taught 
students to take an active role as models for positive health decisions. The Parent to Parent speaker series 
had an established program of speakers that directly tied to curriculum initiatives. Health teachers made 
an in-depth presentation at a monthly high school PAC meeting on mental and emotional health and teen 
suicide. 

Technology 

The Andover Public Schools' Technology Department continues to strive to meet our goal of enhancing 
student learning with the application of technology to assist our students with accessing, collecting, 
authenticating, managing, assessing, and analyzing information effectively and ethically. Currently we 
support 7129 users that access 2370 networked desktop and laptop computers, the Plant & Facilities 
Department video security and entry system and the HVAC monitoring systems and the enterprise size 
infrastructure that is necessary to support our clients. 

During the past year the Technology Department completed the consolidating of its 35 stand-alone 
servers to 8 physical blade servers and consolidating its data storage and backup systems. In addition, we 
added a remote replication system for disaster recovery. We upgraded 50 Andover High School Art and 
Graphic computers and repurposed the 50 Pentium P4 Art and Graphic's computers to replace 50 nine 
year old AHS PII classroom computers. We upgraded the 120 seven year old mobile wireless laptop labs 
B at Doherty Middle School and West Middle School and the seven year old mobile wireless labs at 
Bancroft and West Elementary. Thanks to the PTO at West Elementary School we purchased, 
configured, and installed a second 30 unit mobile Ageless laptop lab and 3 Interactive Whiteboards. We 
also upgraded 35 teacher/administrative laptops and 40 of our 755 printers. In total we were able to 



upgrade 200 of our 2370 computers or 8.5 % of our CPU inventory with new equipment. This calculates 
out to an 11 .85 year replacement cycle if funding continues at the present level. 

Physical Education Department 

Our K-12 Physical Education teachers strove to instill in their students an understanding of the 
importance of physical fitness and activity and the critical role it plays in their overall lifetime health and 
well-being. Implementing a comprehensive curriculum that is based on the National Association for Sport 
and Physical Education standards, as well as the Massachusetts Health Curriculum frameworks, our PE 
teachers taught students a wide variety of movement concepts, health related components and skill related 
components of physical fitness, and sports skills and activities that promote a healthy and active lifestyle. 
In addition to these curricular offerings, elementary physical education teachers ran the American Heart 
Association Jump Rope for Heart and Hoops for Heart programs. The adapted physical education teachers 
hosted a full day workshop for teaching students with special needs that was attended by more than fifty 
teachers from schools across the northeastern part of the state. The middle school physical education 
teachers conducted a cross country race for all middle school students, and the elementary physical 
education teachers conducted a cross country race for fourth and fifth grade students. The high school 
cross country team and coaches helped facilitate both events. 

Athletic Department 

The athletic department is committed to the philosophy that participants are students first and athletes 
second. Interscholastic athletics is a co-curricular activity that serves as an extension of the academic 
classroom. It is a place where teachers are truly teaching what they want to teach to students who are 
truly learning what they want to learn. The educational experiences of all individuals participating are 
enhanced through the learning of the values of healthy competition, teamwork, goal setting, respect, and 
hard work. Over fifteen hundred roster spots were filled by student-athletes who took advantage of the 
opportunities for learning through the athletic program during the 2008 year. 

The Boston Globe recognized Andover as the runner up for the Dalton Award which is the combined 
boys and girls winning percentage for 2008. The Girls Indoor Track team was the All State Champions 
and the Girls Basketball team was Eastern Massachusetts Champions. Andover High School was 
recognized by the MIAA with a state sportsmanship award in 2008 as well as receiving individual state 
sportsmanship recognition for our Boys Lacrosse program. The following teams earned Merrimack 
Valley Conference Championships in 2008; Boys Swimming, Girls Basketball, Girls Indoor Track, Girls 
Skiing, Basketball Cheerleading, Boys Tennis, Girls Tennis, Boys Lacrosse, Girls Lacrosse, Softball, 
Golf, Football Cheerleading, and Field Hockey. 

On behalf of students, parents and staff, I thank the town of Andover for its ongoing support of our 
schools. This is support that continues to ensure that Andover is a place where people want to live, to 
work, and to raise a family. 

Respectfully submitted, 

0, 




Dr. Claudia L. Bach 
Superintendent of Schools 



100 



GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 



Greater Lawrence Technical School is a regional vocational secondary institution with 
a campus in West Andover encompassing twenty-six acres. The school educates students 
from Andover, Lawrence, Methuen and North Andover and, in addition, accepts qualified 
students from other communities through the school choice program. There are currently 
twenty-six underclassmen from Andover attending the school and fifteen employees of 
Greater Lawrence Tech reside in Andover. 

Greater Lawrence Technical School is accredited by the New England Association of 
Schools and Colleges. In 2008, sixty-three percent of the senior class went on to continue 
their education in either a four or two year college following graduation while the remaining 
students combined either college with full-time employment or made a direct impact on the 
workforce of the Merrimack Valley. College-bound graduates increased twenty-two percent 
versus the graduating class of 2007 (41%). 

The sixteen career opportunities offered to students through a five-academy model 
include Allied Health, Automotive Collision Repair, Automotive Technology, Biotechnology, 
Carpentry, Culinary Arts, Cosmetology, Electricity, Electronics & Pre-Engineering, Fashion 
Technology, Graphic Communication, Information Support Services & Networking, 
Marketing, Metal Fabrication & Joining Technologies, Office Technologies and Plumbing. 
Our Technical School has been one of the pioneers in the state regarding the successful 
academy model. 

Greater Lawrence Technical School prepares students for lifetime employment 
through nationally and state recognized licensure and certification programs including; 
Building Supervisors License, State Cosmetology, NATEF, ASE, Refrigerant Recovery and 
Recycling License, CareerSafe, SP2, Mass I/M Certification and License, American Culinary 
Federation License, ServSafe, State Board of Electricians, OSHA Safety Certification, Print 
Ed Certification, Art Collaborative, Graphic Arts Education and Research Foundation, CPR, 
First Aid, CNA, EKG Technician License, Home Health Aide, NCCAP, Paid Feeders 
Program, A+, Cat. 5, Cisco, Hilti Certification, State Board of Plumbing, Water Pex & Trac 
Piping Certification, and Gastite Certification. The Cooperative Education component of 
Greater Lawrence Technical School allows students to use their knowledge and skills at 
worksites in the Merrimack Valley which include many employers in Andover. 

While the school continues to be a community of learners dedicated to service and 
excellence, Greater Lawrence Technical School maintains its mantra "Reggies Moving Up". 
This has been reflected in the improvement in MCAS scores, the phenomenal success of the 
athletic teams and the continued medal winning prowess of both DECA and SKILLS/USA on 
both the State and National level. Greater Lawrence Technical School is extremely proud of 
its thirty-three Abigail and John Adams Scholarship winners. 



101 



Residents of Andover have benefitted from many of the consumer friendly services 
offered to the public through our technical programs. At Greater Lawrence Technical School, 
residents have had their cars repaired, received a haircut, enjoyed lunch in one of our two 
restaurants, had brochures printed, and countless other things which have made life easier for 
townspeople each day. In addition, the residents of Andover continue to use the school 
facility by way of enrollment in classes offered through Community and Youth Services and 
athletic venues for both youth and varsity sports teams, which include the swimming pool, 
gymnasiums and fields. Greater Lawrence Technical School continues to be the site for most 
Andover teens receiving their Lifeguarding and Water Safety certifications. More than sixty 
Andover groups and individuals have utilized the rental option created by The District 
Committee. 

This year, Greater Lawrence Technical School offered a new educational camp during 
February vacation for middle school students. The Imagination Vacation was a technical 
camp offered to students in grades 6, 7, and 8 who were given the opportunity to design, build 
and create a project in the following areas: Pre-Engineering, Biotechnology, and Web Design 
and Development. Each class consisted of educational, motivational, and fun hands-on 
laboratory/workshop sessions. Four of the participants were Andover residents. 

Greater Lawrence Technical School continues to enjoy a close working relationship 
with the Andover Police Department. Since the 2007 - 2008 School Year, an Andover 
patrolman has been employed by the District as a School Resource Officer. His presence 
during the school day, and at after-school and sporting events, has had a positive impact on 
the entire school community. 

The Greater Lawrence Technical School District Committee is made up of seven 
members from the four sending communities of Andover, Lawrence, Methuen and North 
Andover. In addition to representation on the District Committee, Andover is also 
represented by a resident on both the school's Advisory Board and The School Council. 
District Committee representation is determined by the number of students attending from 
that community. 



102 



COMMISSION ON DISABILITY 

The mission of the Andover Commission on Disability is to address Andover's needs for 
the town, its residents, visitors, friends, employers and families relative to disability. 



The Andover Commission on Disability is a commission of nine volunteers serving three- 
year terms and appointed by the Board of Selectmen to advocate on disability-related issues. 
The majority of the Commission members must be disabled or directly related to disability. 

The goals of the Commission are: 

To advocate for the full integration and participation of people with disabilities in 

the Town of Andover. 

To research the needs and problems of people with disabilities in the Town of 

Andover. 

To advise and assist Town officials and employees in addressing the needs of 

people with disabilities. 

To provide information, referral, guidance and technical assistance to individuals, 

public agencies, business and organizations in matters pertaining to disability. 

To participate to the maximum extent possible in disability-related programs of a 

local, regional, State and Federal nature. 

To support training related to disability to people who reside or work in the Town 

of Andover. 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 

In 2008, our areas of concentration were: 

1 ) Project Lifesaver - A search and rescue project with the Andover Police Department 

2) Access Projects: The Main Street Project, The Park and Barnard Streets Project 

3) Playground Project: Lower Shawsheen Playground 

4) Handicap Parking Program 

5) Information Resource 

PROJECT LIFESAVER 

Project Lifesaver continues to be a priority for the Andover Commission on Disability. 
The Commission originally sponsored the equipment and education of police officers for this 
search and rescue program for people who wander from safety. This program is available to all 
residents regardless of their ability to pay. The Commission has an ongoing sub-committee 
working with the Andover Police Department. Currently, the program has an enrollment of 10 
families. The main thrust continues to outreach into the community to create an overall 
awareness of the program within Andover and surrounding communities. This year, the 
Commission assisted North Andover in setting up and implementing their own system which 
provides both towns additional trained police personnel in the event of an emergency. 



103 



ACCESS PROJECTS 

The Main Street Project 

For the past three years and completed in 2008, the Access sub-committee completed its 
goal of surveying every business with a Main Street address from Stevens Street to School 
Street. This was in direct compliment to the Main Street Project of the Town. While the 
Commission also contributed to decisions on sidewalks and curb cuts, its focus was on the 
entryways of each business and the subsequent travel paths our disabled citizens would 
encounter. In all, site reviews of 159 places of business were completed with an evaluation 
based on the guidelines of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Of these businesses, 
only 29% were in full compliance with the 18 year old federal law; 77 businesses or 48% need 
major renovation to meet compliance while 36 businesses or 23% would need only minor 
adjustments to be in compliance with federal law. 

Recommendations for adaptations and modifications were made to both business owners 
and property owners at the time of the site visits. If a business met all ADA requirements, the 
Disability Commission awarded a window decal stating they are a disability-friendly facility. If 
adaptations were needed, they were described in writing with reference to federal and state laws 
and recommendations on approaches to change. At the conclusion of the overall study, 
presentations of the findings and their implications were made to the Town Manager, Board of 
Selectmen and Planning Board of the Town and the Andover Business Center Association. The 
information was well received and the Commission was encouraged to complete further site 
reviews of prominent "downtown" streets. 

The Park and Barnard Streets Project 

While continuing to advocate for accessibility improvements to the Main Street 
businesses the Access Sub-Committee studied, the Commission is currently studying the 
entrances and navigation of Park Street and Barnard Street businesses in the downtown. The 
study will be completed in early 2009. Findings will be sent to both business owners and their 
property owners who are jointly responsible to provide access to handicapped residents as 
mandated by the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. They will also be shared with Town 
planners as was the initial study. 

PLAYGROUND PROJECT 

Lower Shawsheen Playground 

For several years, the Commission has committed itself to improving the accessibility of 
the Town's playgrounds. The Lower Shawsheen Playground was the focus of last year's efforts. 
As a combined effort with the Plant and Facilities Department and the Disability Commission, an 
ADA compliant play structure was added to the playground. 



104 



HANDICAP PARKING PROGRAM 

This ongoing ticketing program by volunteer members of the Commission consists of 
photographing vehicles parked illegally in official handicap parking spaces in Andover. Such 
parking violations are documented on special forms and submitted with the photos of the car in 
the illegal location to the Andover Police Department. Citations are then issued for the 
violations, currently at $100.00 each. The program's intent is to support the Police Department 
and to help protect the rights of the handicapped. 

INFORMATION RESOURCE 

The Commission on Disability publishes a newsletter in a continuing education effort and 
as a report to the community of our activities in the Town. The newsletter is available at various 
locations around the Town including the Town Offices, the Senior Center, Old Town Hall, the 
Library, the Safety Center, and on our website. 

The Commission's website is http://andoverma.gov/boards/disability . It is intended to 
inform residents of programs and services for the disabled, the activities and efforts of the 
Commission, as well as areas of concern needing advocacy. 



105 



PRESERVATION COMMISSION 

The Andover Preservation Commission endeavors to fulfill its mission to advise the town 
concerning the preservation of its historic and archeological resources and has been active in 
the following areas. 

DEMOLITION DELAY BYLAW 

The Preservation Commission heard demolition requests for four properties and imposed 
delays of to 12 months. Two structures were deemed historically significant - one was 
demolished and one is awaiting demolition. One application was withdrawn because the project 
was denied by the Zoning Board of Appeals. One structure was determined to be not historically 
significant. One historically significant building was razed without the proper permit or review. 

REVIEW OF PLANS 

The Commission reviewed twenty-four applications for historic appropriateness. Ten of 
those applications required no formal review. 

DIMENSIONAL SPECIAL PERMIT/HISTORIC PRESERVATION 

One request was submitted and approved by the Zoning Board of Appeals. 

LOCAL HISTORIC DISTRICTS 

The Preservation Commission and the Ballardvale Historic District Commission work 
cooperatively on issues of mutual interest. 

DESIGN REVIEW BOARD 

The Commission remains vitally interested in the historic buildings and character of the 
downtown and Main Street corridor to Rte. 495. This year, the DRB was instrumental in 
developing the design for the Korean Veterans Memorial now located in The Park. 

WEST PARISH GARDEN CEMETERY COMMITTEE 

See www.westparishgardencemetery.org for more information. The Committee replaced 
a roof on one of the original West Parish Church horse sheds which will be used for storage. 

HERITAGE EDUCATION 

The 18 Annual Andover Preservation Awards were held in May at the Memorial Hall 
Library in cooperation with the Andover Historical Society and the Ballardvale Historic District 
Commission to recognize outstanding examples of historic preservation in the community. Eight 
property owners received recognition for their efforts. Also recognized were: Joan Silva 
Patrakis, Historian; The Andover Garden Club in its 80 th year and the Historic Preservation 
Website Development Team. 



106 



PROJECTS OF NOTE 

Historic Building Survey Project - www, mhl. org/historicpreservation/ 

May 2008 was the official launch date for the new historic preservation website. 
Comission member Lynn Smiledge is directing the first phase of the project to update and 
add to the Andover Historic Building Survey, a collaborative effort of the Preservation 
Commission, the Andover Historic Society and Memorial Hall Library. The project is 
digitizing the general survey of Andover's historic buildings from the late 1 7th century 
through the early 20th century. The website, hosted by Memorial Hall Library, allows 
researchers and Town departments internet access to this information. It will be modified 
as new information becomes available. Phase 2 of this project will broaden the survey to 
include appropriate 20 th century buildings. 

Wood Park 

The Preservation Commission is working with the Town's Plant and Facilities 
Department, the Design Review Board and Mrs. Rosalyn Wood to design an appropriate 
memorial monument to William Wood to be built in Wood Park on North Main Street in 
Shawsheen Village. Restoration of the historic fence, park maintenance and enhancement 
are also being addressed. 

Preservation Restrictions 

The Commission continues to develop goals and pursue opportunities to better preserve 
the Town's historic resources. Preservation restrictions are an approval requirement of 
the Dimensional Special permit for Historic Preservation. Two Preservation Restrictions 
are in process. The Commission encourages individual homeowners to consider 
Preservation Restrictions or easements for the protection of their historic properties. 

Historic Restoration/Rehabilitation Information 

Acting in their advisory capacity, the Commission is developing and offering educational 
materials to the public. These resources help individual building owners understand the 
meaning of historic preservation, instruct them on the selection of appropriate materials 
and direct them to appropriate alternatives when cost is an issue. As always, the 
Commission is willing to advise building owners on their historic preservation projects. 
In 2008, an information sheet on the preservation of historic windows was developed by 
member Lynn Smiledge. Commission member Jim Batchelder is researching and 
designing detailed maps for all seven National Register Historic Districts. All new 
information will be available on the website. 

Essex National Heritage Commission Award 

Commission Chair Karen Herman was awarded the "Pioneers in Partnership Award for 
Historic Preservation " by the Essex National Heritage Commission. She was nominated 
on behalf of the Town by the Town Manager. 

107 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Andover Housing Authority was organized in June 1948. Monthly meetings are held 
on the third Thursday of every month at the Stowe Court Community Room, 100 Morton Street, 
except during January, May and October when meetings are held at the Frye Circle Community 
Room, 256 North Main Street. Board members and Executive Director are as follows: 

James Cuticchia - Chairman Calvin Deyermond, Vice Chairman 

Francis O'Connor - Treasurer Daniel T. Grams - Assistant Treasurer 

Janice Burkholder - Member Christine Poschen-Metzemaekers - Ex. Director 

The Andover Housing Authority has thirty-three buildings on six different sites 
comprised of 218 units of State-aided housing for elder/disabled people on Chestnut Court, 
Grandview Terrace, Frye Circle and Stowe Court. There are 56 units of family housing in 
Memorial Circle. In addition, the AHA owns one house under the Mass. Chapter 689 Program 
for developmentally disabled adults and administers ten Alternative Housing Vouchers under the 
Massachusetts (AHVP) leased housing program for a total of 292 state units. 

State-funded Programs - Income Limits are as follows: 

1 person - $43,050 3 people - $55,350 5 people - $66,400 7 people - $76,250 

2 people - $49,200 4 people- $61,500 6 people -$71,350 8 people -$81,200 

Apartment Turnover 

22 Elder/Disabled Units ( 1 0%) 1 Family Units ( 1 9%) - including transfers to larger or 

smaller units and reasonable accommodations 
Average Rent: $3 14 - Elder/Disabled Program $390 - Family Program (includes all utilities) 

State-funded Grants - Capital Improvements 
Grandview Terrace - Boilers - $30,000 

Memorial Circle - HC Renovation - $25,000 (preliminary funds) 
Frye Circle - Hallway windows and doors - $25,000 (preliminary funds) 
Chestnut Court - Roofs - $81,250 and Electric Transformer Repairs - $10,000 

State-funded Grant - New Horizons for Youth Program 

An after school homework program for Memorial Circle children funded through the Andover 
Police Department under the Edward Byrne Memorial State and Local Law Enforcement 
Assistance Program. 

Federally-funded Programs 

The AHA administers 127 vouchers under the Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher Program 

through HUD. Section 8 income limits are as follows: 

1 person - $28,200 3 people - $36,250 5 people- $43,500 7 people - $49,950 

2 people - $32,250 4 people - $40,300 6 people - $46,750 8 people - $53,200 

Family Self Sufficiency Program (25 slots) 

Completed in June 2008 as the last four participants graduated to self sufficiency and received 

their escrow funds. 

108 



ANIMAL INSPECTION 



2006 2007 2008 



Number of dogs quarantined for biting 

Number of animals tested for Rabies 

Number of animals testing positive for Rabies 

Number of cats quarantined for Rabies exposure 

Number of dogs quarantined for Rabies exposure 

Number of barns inspected 

Number of beef cattle 

Number of beef steers 

Number of beef herds (one animal constitutes a herd) 

Number of horses 

Number of donkeys 

Number of sheep 

Number of goats 

Number of swine 

Number of swine herds 

Number of Llamas 



The annual Rabies Immunization Clinic was held on Saturday, April 5, 2008 at the Andover 
Animal Hospital on Lowell Street. 



21 


16 


25 


5 


13 


7 











54 


50 


35 


16 


13 


14 


2 


16 


16 


4 


3 


3 


3 








2 


2 


1 


78 


74 


78 


4 


4 


5 


3 


3 





3 


2 


3 


90 


65 


65 


1 


1 


1 





7 


13 



109 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR 01Jan08-31Dec08 



CAPITAL ACCOUNT 
SUMMARY OF TRANSACTIONS 



1-Jan-2008 



PRINCIPAL FUND 



Money Mkt Fund (CBPF) 
Securities @ Book 
Res.for Cost/Mkt. 



$0 00 -Gain/(Loss) - Sale of Securities 
$186,703.92 -Transfers to/from Operating Accts. 
$0.00 - Adj. to lower of Cost/Market 



$8,450.00 Money Mkt Fund (CBPF) 
-$15,417.10 Securities @ Book 
Res.for Cost/Mkt 



31-Dec-2008 

$0.00 

$179,736.82 

$0.00 



$186,703.92 



Increase 



-$6,967.10 



$179,736.82 



OPERATING ACCOUNTS 



Sav Acct / CD 

Checking Account 
Money Mkt Fund (CBRF) 



$0.00 

$7,338.20 

$62,560.56 



(RESERVE FUND & CASH ACCOUNTS) 
INCOME (01Jan2008-31Dec2008) 



$69,898.76 



Gain/(Loss) on Sales 
Stock Dividends Received 
Interest Received-Bonds/Notes 
Interest Received-Broker/MM 
Other income 
Stock Dividends - Foreign 
Capital Gain Dist - MF 

Income Total 



EXPENSES (01Jan2008-31Dec2008) 



- To/From Principal 

- To/From Reserve 



$8,450.96 

$4,060.25 Sav Acct / CD 

$500.00 Checking Account 
$1,156.94 Money Mkt Fund (CBRF) 

$138.31 
$1,718.38 
$7,225.44 



$23,250.28 



Andover High School Projects 


08/09 


$1,080.65 


Andover High School Projects 


07/08 


$0.00 


Andover High School Projects 


06/07 


$3,447.42 


Investment Counsel Fees 




$1,438.00 


Misc. Operating Expenses 




$153.19 


Foreign Taxes Paid 




$46.12 


Honorarium 




$600.00 


Other misc exp 




$0.70 


Expense Total 




$6,766.08 


Net Gain/(Loss) 


$16,484.20 


TRANSFERS 







$0.00 

$5,618.94 

$87,731.12 



$93,350.06 



lncrease/(Decrease) 



$16,484.20 



$256,602.68 



TOTAL PRINCIPAL AND OPERATING ACCOUNTS 



$273,086.88 



110 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 

ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 01810 

CAPITAL ACCOUNT 

SECURITIES BOUGHT AND SOLD 
DURING THE CALENDAR YEAR 01 Jan2008-31Dec08 



BEGINNING BOOK VALUE STOCKS/MUTUAL FUNDS - 1/1/2008 
LESS: STOCKS/MUTUAL FUNDS- Sold/Exchanged 



PROCEEDS COST GAIN/(LOSS) 

STOCKS & MUTUAL FUNDS 
186,703.92 



2/8/2008 Sold 

4/17/2008 Sold 

6/10/2008 Sold 

6/11/2008 Sold 

11/20/2008 Sold 



300 Shs Raytheon Co 

800 Shs Petrohawk Energy Corp 

300 Shs Diebold Inc 

400 Shs Vectren Corp 

400 Shs Liberty Media Interactive Ser A 



$19,583.88 
$17,661.69 
$11,780.01 
$11,998.12 
$1,133.72 



TOTAL Sold 



ADD: STOCKS/MUTUAL FUNDS - Acquired 



1/11/2008 Bought 
5/15/2008 Bought 
9/12/2008 Bought 



BOOK VALUE - 12/31/2008 



800 Shs Ishares MSCI Japan Index Fund 
300 Shs MDU Resources Group 
600 Shs Duke Energy Holding Corp 

Total Acquired 



$9,446.23 

$10,436.25 

$11,050.26 

$9,912.28 

$9,659.25 



$62,157.42 $50,504.27 



$10,469.25 

$9,171.35 

$10,938.57 



$30,579.17 
166,778.82 



$10,137.65 

$7,225.44 

$729.75 

$2,085.84 

-$8,525.53 

$11,653.15 



BONDS/NOTES 



BEGINNING BOOK VALUE - 1/1/2008 

LESS: BONDS/NOTES - Sold/Matured/Redeemed 



9/30/2008 Sold 



50,000 Shs FHLB Call Bonds Rate 4.00% 



TOTAL Sold/Matured 

ADD: BUNU5/NU I tb - Acquired 

6/30/2008 Bought 50000.000 shs FHLB Rate 4.0% 

9/17/2008 Bought 25000.000 Shs FFCB Call Bond 4.05% 



TOTAL Acquired 



BOOK VALUE - 12/31/2008 



$0.00 

$50,000.00 



$50,000.00 

$50,000.00 
$25,005.25 

$25,005.25 

$25,005.25 



TOTAL SECURITIES/MUTUAL FUNDS @ BOOK VALUE - 12/31/2008 

RESERVE FOR LOWER OF COST/MARKET VALUE 

TOTAL SECURITIES/MUTUAL FUNDS @ ADJ. BOOK VALUE - 12/31/2008 

Broker - Cash/MM Reserve and Principal Funds- 12/31/2008 

TDBN Checking account 12/31/2008 



TOTAL VALUE OF ASSETS - 12/31/2008 



$191,784.07 

$0.00 

$179,736.82 

$87,731.12 

$5,618.94 



$273,086.88 



GainV(Loss) 
$11,653.15 



111 



PROJECT 

1 . Microscopies Studies 

2. Performing Opportunities 

3. AHS Marching Band 

4. AHS Robotics Club 

5. Principal's Discretionary Fund ($2000.00 this year) 
plus $2788.57 carry over from the 2007-2008 year 

6. Steps to Success 

7. Peer Ambassador Program 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
Capital Account 

FUNDED PROJECTS 2008-2009 SCHOOL YEAR 
(01 Jul2008-30Jun2009) 



Total 



Approved 
at trustee's meeting 

9-May-20O8 


Expended 

as of 31Dec2008 


Unexpended 
Balance 

as of 31Dec2008 


$1,250.00 


$0.00 


$1,250.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$1,500.00 


$0 00 


$1,500.00 


$1,500.00 


$0.00 


$1,500.00 


$2,000.00 
$2,788.57 


$741.90 
$338.75 


$1,258.10 
$2,449.82 


$2,000.00 


$0.00 


$2,000.00 


$950.00 


$0.00 


$950.00 


$11,988.57 


$1,080.65 


$10,907.92 



DETAILS OF MISC. OPERATING EXPENSE 





l-Jul-08 


1-Jl^2O07 






thru 


thru 






31-Dec-2008 


30-Jun-2OO8 


Variance 


Copying/Printing Costs 


$9.40 


$22.70 


($13.30) 


Postage 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


Office Supplies - Computer cartridges, paper (1/3) 


$0.00 


$27.26 


-$27.26 


Other miscellaneous expenses 


$100.00 


$0.70 


$99.30 


Fidelity Insurance 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


Treasurer's Honorarium 


$0.00 


$600.00 


-$600.00 


Total 


109.40 


$650.66 


($541.26) 



112 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

FUNDS ANALYSIS AS OF: December 31, 2008 



CAPITAL ACCOUNT 
PRINCIPAL FUND 



STOCKS & BONDS 



25000.000 
600.000 
300 000 
200.000 
500.000 
300.000 
300 000 
200 000 
300 000 
300.000 
200.000 
200.000 
400.000 
300.000 
300.000 
800.000 



Shs FFCB Callable Bonds Rate 4.0500% 

Shs Duke Energy Holding Corp 

Shs MDU Resources Group 

Shs Anadarko Petroleum Corp 

Shs. Atmos Energy Corp. 

Shs CVS 

Shs General Electric 

Shs Glaxo Smithkline PLC ADR 

Shs. Honeywell Intl. Inc. 

Shs International Paper 

Shs. Kimberty Clark Corp. 

Shs Novartis AG Spon Adr 

Shs Pfizer tnc 

Shs. Unilever PLC 

Shs Hugoton Royalty Trust UBI 

Shs Ishares Inc MSCI Japan Index Fund 

TOTAL STOCKS & BONOS 



TOTAL MONEY MARKET & SECURITIES 
Reserve for Lower of Cost /Market 
TOTAL PRINCIPAL FUND 



RESERVE FUND 



BANKNORTH CD ACCOUNT 
Broker/MM Cash Reserve 



TOTAL RESERVE FUND 



CASH FUND 



CHECKING ACCOUNT - Banknorth 

TOTAL FUNDS 







Market Value 


Book 


Marke* 


Over/(Under) 


Value 


Value 


Book Value 


31-Dec-2008 


31-Dec-2«X)8 


31-Dec-2008 


$25,005.25 


$25,00^ ! '.75 


$2.50 


$10,938.57 


$9,00S.OO 


-$1,932.57 


$9,171.35 


$6,47.«=»-00 


-$2,697.35 


$8,922.47 


$7,710.00 


-$1,212.47 


$10,529.50 


$11,850.00 


$1,320 50 


$9,481.25 


$8,62S.OO 


-$859.25 


$10,024.81 


$4,86000 


-55,16481 


$11,099.25 


$7,45*=».0O 


-$3,645.25 


$10,673.98 


$9,84B.00 


-$824.98 


$10,173.46 


$3,540.00 


-$6,633.46 


$11,696.03 


S10.54S.OO 


-$1.14803 


$11,690.87 


$9.95=2 00 


-$1,738.87 


$10,219.25 


$7,08-=».OO 


-$3,135.25 


$11,631.94 


$12,430.80 


$798.86 


$8,009.59 


$4,81S.OO 


-$3,194.59 


$10,469.25 


$7.66—4.00 


-$2,805.25 


$179,736.82 


$146,86^.55 


-$32,870.27 


$179,736.82 


$145,86^.55 


-$32,870.27 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$179,736.82 


$146,86*B.55 


-332,870.27 


$0.00 


$40.00 


$0 00 


$87,731.12 


$87,73-1.12 
$87,73^!.. J 


$0.00 


$87,731.12 


$0 00 


$5,618.94 


$5,61 SS. 94 


$0.00 


$273,086.88 


$240,21 «6.61 


-$32,870.27 



Capital Fund Market value as of 12/31/08 $240,216.61 

Change in Market Value from 1/1/2008 -$32,870.27 



113 



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114 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 

ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 01810 

SCHOLARSHIP ACCOUNT 

SECURITIES BOUGHT AND SOLD 
TWELVE MONTHS ENDED - December 31, 2008 



BEGINNING BOOK VALUE - 1/1/2008 

LESS: STOCKS/MUTUAL FUNDS- Sold/Exchanged 

2/22/2008 Trow Sold 517.003 shs Pioneer Small Cap Value Fund 

2/26/2008 Trow Sold 252.982 shs Pioneer Equity Inc Fund CIA (758.494 shs left) 

2/26/2008 Trow Sold 800.000 shs Pioneer High Yield Fund CIA (4100.61 shs left) 

2/26/2008 Schol Sold 1203.435 shs Templeton Growth Fund CIC 

10/9/2008 Schol Sold 1166.744 shs Templeton Growth Fund CIA 

10/14/2008 Schol Sold 452.080 shs Capital Income Builder Fund CIA / SF 

10/14/2008 Trow Sold 561.590 shs Pioneer Cullen Value Fund CIA /Trow 

TOTAL Sold 

ADD: STOCKS/MUTUAL FUNDS - Acquired 



2/22/2008 Trow Bought 561.590 shs Pioneer Cullen Value Fund CIA 

2/26/2008 Schol Bought 1166.744 shs Templeton Growth Fund CIA 

2/26/2008 Trow Bought 828.272 shs Income Fund of America CIF 

10/9/2008 Schol Bought 2674.090 shs Franklin US Gov Sec CIA /SF 

10/14/2008 Schol Bought 3105.90 shs Franklin US Gov Sec CIA /SF 

10/14/2008 Trow Bought 1325.311 shs Franklin US Gov Sec CIA /Trow 



PROCEEDS COST GAIN/(LOSS) 

STOCKS & MUTUAL FUNDS 

$235,253.05 



funds from above 



11,264.00 


$10,721.85 


$542.15 


7,000.00 


$7,000.00 


$0.00 


8,000.00 


$8,000.00 


$0.00 


25,320.27 


$22,509.73 


$2,810.54 


17,221.14 


$25,225.00 


-$8,003.86 


$20,000.00 


$23,756.80 


-$3,756.80 


$8,328.38 


$11,267.00 


-$2,938.62 


$97,133.79 


$108,480.38 


-$11,346.59 



11,267.00 
25,225.00 
15,000.00 
$17,221.14 
$20,000.00 
$8,535.00 



BOOK VALUE - 12/31/2008 



TOTAL Acquired 



97,248.14 
224,020.81 

BONDS/NOTES 



BEGINNING BOOK VALUE - 1/1/2008 

LESS: BONDS/NOTES - Sold/Matured/Redeemed 



None 



TOTAL Sold/Matured 



0.00 



0.00 
0.00 



ADD: BONDS/NOTES - Acquired 



None 



BOOK VALUE - 12/31/2008 



TOTAL Acquired 



TOTAL SECURITIES/MUTUAL FUNDS @ BOOK VALUE - 12/31/2008 

RESERVE FOR LOWER OF COST/MARKET VALUE 

TOTAL SECURITIES/MUTUAL FUNDS @ ADJ. BOOK VALUE - 12/31/2008 

Broker - Cash/MM Reserve Funds and Checking Account - 12/31/2008 

Federated Capital Reserve MM Account - TROW - 12/31/2008 

TDBN Cash Checking acct 12/31/2008 



0.00 
0.00 

0.00 



$224,020.81 

$0.00 

$224,020.81 

$42,121.48 

$8,115.74 

$1,870.00 



Total 

Gain/(Loss) 
-11,346.59 



TOTAL VALUE OF ASSETS - 12/31/2008 



$276,128.03 



115 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 



DONAND DUNN FUND 

HW& MP BARNARD 

J W BARNARD 

ALICE M BELL 

THOMAS BLACK 

EDNA G CHAPIN 

FRED W DOYLE 

WARREN F DRAPER 

WILLIAM G GOLDSMITH 

ELIZABETH T GUTTERSON 

MYRON EGUTTERSON 

ANDOVER GRANGE 

NATHAN C HAMBLIN 

MARGARET F. HINCHCUFFE 

PUNCHARD TRUSTEES 

ANDOVER SERVICEMEN 

HENRY WYATT 

AF.B SWA TROW 

Income/Loss not apportioned at this time 

Adjustment for Maintenance Fee 



STATEMENT FOR SIX MONTHS ENDING: December 31. 2008 
SCHOLARSHIPS AND SPECIAL FUNDS 



Beginning 

BALANCE 

31Ju 12006* 



Mtsc 
Additions 



$276,128.03 $ooc 

'The amounts shown for eec/i scholarship fund are actual as of 01 Ju/2008 

All incomes snnd scholarship awards starting 01Jut05 have been apportioned in 



Apportioned 
Net Income 
1-Jul-2008 

thru 
31-Oec-08 



1^lul-200B 

thru 
31-Dec-0e 



BALANCE 
31-Dec-2008 



$20.000 00 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$20.000 00 


$1.41581 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$1,415.81 


$8,760 56 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$0 00 


$8,760.56 


51 489 70 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$1,489.70 


115816 94 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$15.81694 


$3,328.61 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$0.00 


$3,328.61 


$10.61053 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$10,610.53 


$2.180 30 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$2,180.30 


$3,78123 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$3,781.23 


$1,528.75 


$0.00 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$1,528.75 


52,080 18 


$0 00 


$0.00 


$0 00 


$2,080 18 


$3.70481 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$0.00 


$3,704.81 


$21,32314 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$21,323.14 


$35.91800 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$35,918.00 


S12.443 99 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$12,443.99 


$31,843 87 


$0.00 


$0 00 


$0 00 


$31,843.87 


$17,87892 


$000 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$17,878.92 


$89,652.72 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$0 00 


$89,652-72 


-$7.605 02 








-$7.605 02 


-$25 01 








-$25.01 



$276,128.03 



SUM MARY-lNCOME/(EXPENSE) OUu 108-31 Dec08 

Gross Income - Scholarship Fund 

Interest Income - Broker MM 
Dividend Income - Secuntoes/MF 
Capital Gam Distributions - MF 
Gam/fLoss ) on Safe of Securities 

Expenses 
Maintenance tee - Broker/MM for period Cn Jut08-3 1 DecOS 



$38910 

53,178 72 

$17 43 

-$11,760.66 



June 2008 Golf Tournament 
June 2008 Gotf Tournament 



Net Income - Scholarship Fund 
Gross Income - HPWyafl Fund 
Expenses 

Net Income - HP Wyatt Fund 



$1,897,00 
$0 00 

$1,897.00 



(not apportioned for 
these 6 months) 



(not included at this tone) 



Gross Income Trow Fund 



Interest Inc Broker MM - Trow 

Drv Inc MF - Trow 
Capital Gain Distrib - Trow 
Gam/Loss on Sate of Securities 

Maintenance fee - Trow for period 0tJuK)8-3 1Dec08 
Scholarship expenses are shown above 



Expenses 



Net Income - Trow Fund 



$87.93 

$1,839.65 

$383.00 

-$2,938.62 

$216 65 



-$864.69 



(not applied at this time) 



Total Net Income - 01JulOd~31 DccOS 



-$7,605.02 



FUNDS HELD (31Oec2O08) 






TD BANKNORTH CHECKING ACCT. 

FEDERATED CAPITAL RES. MONEY MARKET FUND 
5779 990 Shs Franklin US Gov Securities CIA 
2.578 907 Shs AMERICAN BALANCED FUND Class A 
885,319 Shs. CAPITAL INCOME BUILDER FUND 
14,529.012 Shs FRANKLIN INCOME FUND Class A 

Total - Individual Scholarship Fund* 

FED CAP RES MONEY MARKET/ TROW FUND 

758.494 Shs. PIONEER EQUITY INCOME/TROW FUND Class A 

1325 311 Shs FranMin US Gov Securities CIA 

828.272 Shs Income Fund of America CI F 

4.100.601 Shs PIONEER HIGH YIELD/ TROW FUND Class A 

Total - Trow Scholarship Funds 

RESERVE FOR LOWER OF COST/MARKET 



Total value of funds hekt (31Oec20O8) 



Book Value (BV) 


Book Value (BV) 


Market Value (MV) 


l^tul-2008 


31-Oec-2008 


31-Dec-2008 


$0.00 


$1,870.00 


$1,870.00 


$38,971.15 


$42,121.48 


$42,121.48 




$37,221.14 


$38,281 48 


$47,329.79 


$47,329.79 


$35.537 34 


$46,523.50 


$22,76670 


$17,992.42 


$36,100.00 


$36,100.00 


$24.263 45 


$168,924.44 


$187/409.11 


$158,176.17 


$8,248.43 


$8,116.74 


$8,115.74 


$20.068 18 


$20,068 18 


$15,139.54 




$8,535.00 


$8,773.56 


$15.000 00 


$15.000 00 


$10,82552 


$37.000 00 


$37,000.00 


$24.808 64 


$78,316.81 


$88,718.92 


$67,863.00 


$0 00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$247,241.05 


$276,128.03 


$227,709.17 



116 






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117 



MARGARET G. TOWLE FUND 

Under the terms of her will, the late Margaret G. Towle, long-time resident of Andover, 
bequeathed the residue of her estate to the Town of Andover, to be held and administered by it as a 
permanent trust fund. This trust is now known as the Margaret G. Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle 
stipulated in her will that the income from this fund "be devoted to the assistance of the procurement 
of assistance for worthy persons residing in the Town of Andover who may be in need of aid, 
comfort or support on account of old age, disability or unemployment." 

The Fund is administered by a group of three Trustees, chosen by the Town Manager with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, which has disbursed the income from the Fund in accordance 
with the terms of Mrs. Towle's will. The cases are referred to the Trustees by private charitable 
groups and organizations, the Clergy and interested individuals. 

During 2008, the Trustees acted on thirty-nine cases, disbursing $33,327.53 on thirty-six 
approved cases and small administration expenses. Only the income of the Fund is available. The 
principal of $345,825.50 and a substantial portion of the current income are invested under the 
direction of the Trustees. All disbursements are made by the Town Treasurer upon vouchers 
approved by the Trustees. 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31, 2007 $99,683.20 

Receipts - 2008 19,231.69 

$118,914.89 

Disbursements - 2008 33,327.53 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31,2008 $ 85,587.36 



JOHN CORNELL FUEL ASSISTANCE FUND 

The John Cornell Fuel Assistance Fund was established by Article 17 of the 1893 Annual 
Town Meeting. Five thousand dollars was left to the Town to be used for the needy and poor to 
purchase wood or coal. In 1995 the trust documents were modified by the Probate Court of 
Massachusetts to permit the use of all types of fuel for heating, cooking or electrical purposes. Three 
Trustees, with staggered terms approved by vote at the Annual Town Meeting, administer the funds. 
The Trustees approved six applications during the year. 



Balance on hand 6/30/07 $52,636.39 

Income - FY-2008 2, 1 28.76 

Expenditures - FY-2008 3,400.00 

Balance as of 6/3 0/08 $51,365.15 



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133 



80001 STABILIZATION 

80041 CD WOOD 

80061 ESTATE SP WHITE 5.766 63 

80071 POLICE DRUG ACCOUNT 

80091 TOWN 400TH CELEBRATION 

80141 J GREELEY 5.000 00 



80161 MARGARET G TOWLE 345.825 50 

80151 MARGARET G TOWLE 



80171 JOHN CORNELL 5.000 00 

80181 DAVID S LUCY SHAW 10.000 00 

80191 W.L RAYMOND 7.845 81 

80201 A J LINCOLN 5.000 00 

80211 E.I RAYMOND 1.302.77 

80221 TAYLOR 300 00 

80231 SPRING GROVE 654.796 00 

80251 SPRING GROVE FLOWERS 



80281 EMILINE LINCOLN 
80291 EMMA J LINCOLN 



80301 CONSERVATION FUND 

80331 SMART 1. 

80341 FARRINGTON 

80351 BALLARDVALE 

80361 ALLEN 

80391 EMS BELL LIBRARY TRUST 

80411 ELDERLY TAXATION FUND 

80421 MUNICIPAL AFFORDABLE HOUSING 

82011 DRAPER 

82021 RICHARDSON 1 

82031 A S AV LINCOLN 1 



82051 RAFTON (INTEREST) 
82041 RAFTON (PRINCIPAL) 



82061 CONROY 



82071 AMERICAN LEGION 



82081 CHRIS MAYNARD BOOKS 



82091 HOLT 



INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 

80011 INSURANCE 

80021 UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 

80031 TOWN INSURANCE HEALTH 

HEALTH INSURANCE W/C DEPOSIT 

80371 WORKERS COMPENSATION 

TOTAL INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 
GRAND TOTAL ALL TRUST FUNDS 



BALANCE 
July 1 2007 



TRUST-CEMETERY -SPECIAL FUNDS 

IN CUSTODY OF THE TOWN TREASURER 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30. 2008 

BALANCE 

July 1. 2007 DEPOSITS 



214,568 12 
49.771 54 
93.631 96 



BALANCE 
June 30, 2006 



435.771 86 


3.041.51901 


913,95300 




128,636 96 




4.084,108 97 


435,771 86 


3.041.51901 


913.953 00 


00 


128.6 JO 96 


00 


4.084.10897 


1.0B6. 19896 


1.279,94966 






52.610 71 


165.000 00 


1,167.56037 


1.086,198 96 


1.279.949.66 


00 


000 


52,610 71 


165.000 00 


1,167.560 37 


13,356 68 


15.148 70 






679 16 




15,827 86 


13.356 68 


15.148 70 


00 


00 


679 16 


00 


15,827 86 


16.071 83 


30.531 71 


10,251 00 




74 04 


9.083 65 


31.773 10 


16.071 83 


30.531 71 


10,251 00 


00 


74 04 


9,083 65 


31.773 10 


6.80591 


8.301 35 






343 97 




8,645.32 


6.805 91 


6.301.35 


000 


00 


343 97 


00 


8.645.32 


6,958 40 


6,859 15 






285 26 




7,144 41 


55,641 66 


6,859 15 


ooo 


00 


285 26 


00 


7.14441 


345.825 50 


345.825.50 










345.825 50 


124.575 94 


110.572.67 






16,080 10 


35 901 70 


92,751 07 


470.401 44 


456,398 17 


00 


00 


18.080 10 


35.901 70 


438.57657 


51,682.30 


52,636.39 






2.12B76 


3 400 00 


51.365 15 


51.682 30 


52,63639 


000 


00 


2.128 76 


3.400 00 


51.365 15 


37.729 62 


44.45991 






1.843 34 




46,303.25 


37.72962 


44.45991 


00 


00 


1,843 34 


00 


46.303.25 


43.127 02 


50,819 90 






2,107 02 


500 00 


52.426.92 


43.127 02 


50.819 90 


00 


00 


2,107 02 


500 00 


52.426 92 


19.589 42 


22,217 62 






996 08 




23.213 70 


19.589 42 


22,217 62 


00 


000 


996 08 


00 


23.213 70 


2,314 08 


2,726 96 






11304 




2.840 00 


2.314 08 


2.726 96 


00 


00 


11304 


00 


2.840 00 


1.636 04 


1,927 88 






79 93 




2.007.81 


1.636 04 


1.927 86 


00 


00 


79 93 


00 


2.007 81 


526.973 19 


939.631 40 


22.492 00 




31.744 20 


30.00000 


963.867 60 


526.973 19 


939.631 40 


22.492 00 


00 


31.74420 


30,000 00 


963.867 60 


34.887.05 


35.426 80 






1,469 95 


1.475 00 


35.421 75 


34.887 05 


35.426 80 


0.00 


000 


1.469 95 


1 .475 00 


35.421 75 


1.575 79 


1.856.91 






77 00 




1.933.91 


863.28 


1,017 27 






4220 




1.059 47 




2,874 18 


00 


00 


11920 


00 


2.993 36 


51.403 23 


60,571 66 






2.511 36 




63,083.02 


53,84230 


60,571 66 


00 


00 


2.511 36 


00 


63.083 02 


12.341.56 


14,479 34 






600 33 


15 00 


15,06467 


12.341 56 


14.479 34 


00 


000 


600.33 


15 00 


15.064 67 




1,826 67 






75 71 


15 00 


1,887 38 




1.826 67 


00 


00 


7571 


1500 


1.887 38 




1.327 73 






55.06 


25 00 


1,357 79 




1.327 73 


00 


00 


55 06 


25 00 


1,357 79 


273 59 


258 80 






10 74 


15 00 


254 54 


273 59 


258 80 


00 


00 


10 74 


15.00 


254 54 


273 59 


57,370 15 






2,348 08 


1,200 00 


58,51823 


273 59 


57.370 15 


00 


00 


2.34808 


1.200 00 


58,518 23 


146.05 


9.557.04 




1,310 83 






10,86767 


146 05 


9.557 04 


00 


1,31083 


00 


0.00 


10,86787 




7.104 80 






6,71027 


6.308 12 


7.506 95 




7.104 80 


00 


00 


6,71027 


6,308 12 


7.506 95 




15,985 76 






662 78 




16.848.54 




15.985 76 


00 


00 


662 78 


00 


16.648 54 


5.207 42 


1,399 49 






60 44 




1.459 93 


5,207 42 


1.399 49 


000 


00 


6044 


000 


1.459.93 


5,207.42 


1.056 94 






43 47 




1,100.41 


5.207 42 


1.056 94 


00 


00 


43 47 


00 


1.10041 


2.63886 


598 50 










598 50 


598 50 


3,811 77 




240 00 


160 57 




421234 


3.237 36 


4.41027 
1.624 04 


00 


240 00 


160 57 

67 33 


00 


4.810 84 
1.691 37 




1,624 04 


00 


00 


67 33 


000 


1.691 37 




1.197 50 






4966 




1,247 16 




1.197 50 


00 


00 


49 66 


0.00 


1,247 16 




4.628 87 






192 40 




4,821.27 




4,628 87 


00 


00 


19240 


00 


4,821 27 




728 29 






30 21 




758 50 




72829 


00 


000 


30 21 


00 


75850 



6.174.956 14 

241.807 70 

135.85013 

475.67719 

0.00 



100,000 00 
10.447.000 00 4.325.072 62 



10,677 10 
6,673 30 
24.33393 



131,720 00 

50.150 78 

14.730.328 41 



120.764 80 

192.372 65 

541.75533 

0.00 



125.842 71 


141,30841 


68,279 00 






32.399 00 


177.18841 


483.614 33 


994,643 43 


10,615,27900 


4.325,072 62 


41,684 33 


14.944,598 19 


1.032.081 19 


3,485334 50 


7,169.599 57 


11.561 975 00 


4 326.623 45 


296.574 46 


15.197,536 66 


8.157 235 82 



134 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

ANALYSIS OF BONDS AUTHORIZED AND OUTSTANDING 

June 30, 2008 



MUNIS 



ARTICLE 



PROJECT NAME 



EXEMPT DEPT 

6120 ART 10-1, 2002 PUBLIC SAFETY CENTER (ADD! FUNDING) (1) 

6121 ART 1 1 2002 NEW SCHOOL ADDITIONAL FUNDING 

TOTAL EXEMPT 



AUTHORIZATION 
July 1,2007 

580,000.00 
350,000.00 



NEW 
AUTHORIZATION 



BONDING 



AUTHORIZATION 
June 30, 2008 



930,000.00 



80,000.00 



0.00 



500,000.00 
350,000.00 



350,000.00 



6069 


ART 41 1999 


6153 


ART 2A 2004 


6149 


ART 35 2004 


6170 


ART 33 2006 


6183 


ART 36 2007 


6186 


ART 41 2007 


6192 


ART 64 2007 


6216 


ART 33 2008 


6220 


ART 51 2006 



SEWER ENTERPRISE 

SEWER CONSTRUCTION - SO MAIN ST 
SOUTH MAIN AREA SEWERS 
SO MAIN/ROGERS BROOK SEWER 
REPAIR/REPLACEMENT SANITARY SEWER 
DASCOMB/OSGOOD SEWER 
KIRKLAND DRIVE SEWER 
SHAWSHEEN PUMPING STATION 
SHAWSHEEN RIVER OUTFALL SEWER 
SEWER MAIN CONSTRUCTION & RECONST 



4,498,000.00 
1,500,000.00 
1,250,000.00 
500,000.00 
200.000.00 
250.000.00 
750,000.00 



4,000.000.00 
500.000.00 



4.498,000.00 

500.000.00 

1.250,000.00 



0.00 

1,000,000.00 

0.00 

500,000.00 

200,000.00 

250,000.00 

750,000.00 

4.000,000.00 

500,000.00 



8,948,000.00 



4,500.000.00 



6,248.000.00 



7,200,000.00 



WATER ENTERPRISE 

6139 ART 20 2003 WATER TREATMENT PLANT IMPROVEMENTS 

61 58 ART 34 2005 WATER TREATMENT PLANT IMPROVEMENTS 

61 58 ART 34 2005 WATER TREATMENT PLANT IMPROVEMENTS (WPAT) 

6160 ART 41 2005 FISHBROOK PUMPING STATION 



1,472,000.00 

1,198.648.00 

634,717.00 

300,000.00 



3,605,365.00 



1.472,000.00 
1.000.000.00 



50,000.00 



2,522.000.00 



0.00 
198.648.00 
634.717.00 
250,000.00 



1,083,365.00 



TOTAL ENTERPRISE FUNDS 



12,553,365.00 



4,500,000.00 



8,770,000.00 



8,283,365.00 







GENERAL GOVERNMENT 






LANDFILL CLOSURE 


6072 


ART 44 1999 


LANDFILL CLOSURE 


6173 


ART 43 2006 


LANDFILL CAP/LEDGE ROAD 


6214 


ART 31 2008 


LAND FILL CLOSURE 



6122 


ART 12 2002 


6155 


ART 1 1 2005 


6167 


ART 17 2006 


6174 


ART 46 2006 


6179 


ART 15 2007 


6181 


ART 28 2007 


6210 


ART 24 2008 


6210 


ART 27 2008 


6213 


ART 29 2008 



6059 
6135 
6190 
6215 
6219 



6106 
6123 
6193 
6194 
6195 
6189 



ART 74 1999 
ART 48 2002 
ART 52 2007 
ART 32 2008 
ART 50 2008 



ART 12 2001 
ART 23 2002 
ART 2A 2007 
ART 3A 2007 
ART 4A 2007 
ART 51 2007 



6148 


ART 32 2004 


6174 


ART 46 2006 


6180 


ART 27 2007 


6121 


ART 28 2008 


6218 


ART 48 2008 


6171 


ART 37 2006 


6217 


ART 36 2008 



SCHOOL 

WEST ELEMENTARY ASBESTOS REMOVAL 
SCHOOL BUILDING RENOVATIONS/REPAIRS 
SCHOOL ROOF REPLACEMENTS 
SCHOOL HVAC REPLACEMENTS 
SCHOOL ROOF REPLACEMENT 
SCHOOL BUILDING MAINT/IMPROVE 
FEASIBILITY STUDY BANCROFT SCHOOL 
SCHOOL BUILDING RENOVATION 
LOVELY FIELD IMPROVEMENTS 



ROAD AND DRAINAGE 

MAIN STREET STREETSCAPE 

MAIN STREET IMPROVEMENTS 

BRIDGE REPAIRS 

BRIDGE REPAIRS 

STORM DRAINAGE CONSTRUCTION & IMP 



CONSERVATION AND LAND ACQUSITION 

LAND ACQUISITION LOWELL JCT RD 
CONSERVATION FUND 
ACQUIRE 16 PEARSON ST 
ACQUIRE 18 PEARSON ST 
ACQUIRE 37 PEARSON ST 
ACQUIRE 15 BLANCHARDST 



TOWN BUILDINGS 

SENIOR CENTER PLANS 

TOWN HVAC REPLACEMENTS 

TOWN BUILDING MAINT/IMPROVE 

TOWN BUILDING MAINTENANCE/RENOVATION 

RECREATION PARK BALLFIELD LIGHTING 



MISCELLANEOUS 

FIRE PUMPER TRUCK 

FIRE RESCUE/DPW TRUCKS 



TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
GRAND TOTAL 



1,700.000 00 
500,000.00 


7,370,000.00 




1,700,000.00 

500,000.00 

7,370,000.00 


2,200,000.00 

100,000.00 

500,000.00 

1,115,000.00 

200.000.00 

2,980,000.00 

1,065,000.00 


7.370,000.00 

300.000.00 

1,810,000.00 

240.000.00 


0.00 

100,000.00 
500,000.00 
250,000.00 
200,000 00 


9.570,000.00 

0.00 

0.00 

865,000.00 

0.00 

2,980.000.00 

1.065.000.00 

300,000.00 

1,810,000.00 

240,000.00 


5,960,000.00 

254,000.00 
269,500.00 
100,000.00 


2,350,000.00 

600,000.00 
380,000.00 


1,050,000.00 
30,000.00 


7,260,000.00 

224,000.00 
269,500.00 
100,000.00 
600,000.00 
380,000 00 


623.500.00 

900,000.00 
400.000.00 
455,000.00 
390.000.00 
505,000.00 
2,100,000.00 


980,000 00 


30.000.00 

455,000.00 

390,000.00 

505,000.00 

2,100,000.00 


1,573,500.00 

900,000.00 
400,000.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


4,750.000.00 

30,000.00 

250,000.00 
955,000.00 


0.00 

290,000.00 
100,000.00 


3,450,000.00 
250,000.00 


1,300,000.00 

30,000.00 

0.00 

955,000.00 

290,000.00 

100,000.00 


1.235,000.00 
440,000.00 


390,000.00 
973,000.00 


250.000.00 
440,000.00 


1.375.000.00 

0.00 
973.000.00 


440.000.00 


973.000.00 


440,000.00 


973.000.00 


15,208,500.00 


12,063,000.00 


5,220,000.00 


22,051,500.00 


28,691,865.00 


16,563,000.00 


14,070,000.00 


31,184,865.00 



(1 ) The Bureau of Accounts has ruled on October 1 3, 2005 that 
all but $75,000 of this debt is excludable from the provisions 
of Prop 2 1/2. 



135 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen on March 3, 2008 the Inhabitants of said Town 
who are qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the designated 
polling place. All nine precincts: Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight, and 
Nine are to vote at the Collins Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said 
Andover, on 

TUESDAY, THE TWENTY- FIFTH OF MARCH, 2008 

at seven o'clock A.M. to eight o'clock P.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I subscriber, one of the Constables of the Town of Andover, 
have notified the Inhabitants of said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes 
stated in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town Hall, on each 
school house and in no less than five other public places where bill and notices are usually 
posted and by publication in Andover Townsman. Said Warrants have been posted and 
published fourteen days. 

Ronald Bertheim 

Constable 

Election 

ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, one Selectman for three years, one School 
Committee member for three years and one member of the Andover Housing Authority for five 

years. 

The following were elected to office: 

Moderator For One Year Sheila M. Doherty 

9 Juniper Road 

Board of Selectmen For Three Years Mary Kelvie Lyman 

50 School Street 

School Committee For Three Years Dennis F. Forgue 

18 Reservation Road 

Andover Housing Authority For Five Years Janice Burkholder 

22 Arundel Street 

Ballot Question NO 

Community Preservation Act 

QUESTION 

Shall the Town of Andover accept sections 3 to 7, inclusive of chapter 44B of the General Laws, 
as approved by its legislative body, a summary of which appears below? 

QUESTION SUMMARY 

The Community Preservation Act, Sections 3 through 7 of General Laws Chapter 44B, 
allows cities and towns which accept certain of its provisions to create a special Community 

138 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1. 2008 

Preservation Fund by assessing a surcharge on annual real estate taxes and to appropriate monies 
in that fund for open space, historic resources and community housing purposes. Communities 
which impose the surcharge will also be eligible to receive additional monies from a state fund 
created by imposing a surcharge on documents recorded at the Registry of Deeds or Land Court. 

Pursuant to a Town bylaw, a Community Preservation Committee will be established to 
study the needs, possibilities, and resources of the Town regarding community preservation. 
Communities adopting the Act are required to meet certain minimum appropriation requirements 
each year. Specifically, upon recommendation of the Community Preservation Committee, 
Town Meeting must spend or set aside for later spending at least 10% of the annual revenues for 
the following categories of community preservation purpose expenditures: (1) open space 
(excluding land for recreational uses), (2) historic resources and (3) community housing. 
Acceptance of the Act requires approval of Town Meeting and the voters at an election. The 
2007 Annual Town Meeting voted to accept the Act, voted to approve a surcharge of 1% on the 
annual property tax assessed on real property and also voted to approve exemptions for (1) 
property owned and occupied as a domicile by a person who would qualify for low income 
housing or low or moderate income senior housing in the Town and (2) for $100,000 of the value 
of each taxable parcel of residential real property. 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen on April 4, 2008 the Inhabitants of said Town 
who are qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the designated 
polling place. All nine precincts: Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight, and 
Nine are to vote at the Collins Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said 
Andover, on 

WEDNESDAY, THE THIRTIETH DAY OF APRIL, 2008 

at seven o'clock P.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I subscriber, one of the Constables of the Town of Andover, 
have notified the Inhabitants of said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes 
stated in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town Hall, on each 
school house and in no less than five other public places where bill and notices are usually 
posted and by publication in Andover Townsman. Said Warrants have been posted and 
published fourteen days. 

Ronald Bertheim 
Constable 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 30, 2008 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed eight hundred and sixty-six (866) voters 
admitted to the meeting. 

Sheila M. Doherty, Moderator, called the meeting to order at 7:00 P.M. 



139 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

The American Legion Post 8 presented the posting of the Flag. 

The opening prayer was giving by Father Joseph Narog, OS A, of St. Augustine Parish, Essex 
Street. 

There was a moment of silence for the deceased that have worked and lived in the Town. 

The Salute to the flag was led by Brian P. Major, Chairman, Board of Selectmen. 

Megan Burke, freshman at Andover High School, sang the opening song "America", written by 
Samuel Francis Smith while he was living in the Town of Andover. 

Upon unanimous consent it was VOTED to admit eighty (80) non-voters to the meeting and 
escort non- voters to the non- voting section thereafter. 

Upon motion made by Stephani Traina Goldshein, President of the League of Women Voters, 
and duly seconded, it was voted by a Majority vote that a time limit of five minutes would be 
imposed during the 2008 Town Meeting for presenters and that audience speakers would be 
limited to three minutes. Speakers needing additional time may appeal to the Moderator for 
more time. 

The Moderator announced various house keeping issues to the meeting members, including 
turning off cell phones, the order of speakers for the meeting, use of Pro and Con Microphones, 
the location of microphones, stage participants and the location of voting sections. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking, food or drinks (except water) in the 
Gymnasium. 

The Moderator introduced Atty. Christopher Vrountas as the Town Meeting "Ombudsman", and 
reminded meeting members that he would help them with questions on Town Meeting 
procedures and amendments to articles. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with 
the reading of the Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator 
refer to the warrant articles by number and subject matter. 

Election Not Required by Ballot 

ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be elected by ballot or take any 
other action related there. 

On request of the Town Clerk 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Richard Bo wen, 
12 Bannister Road, be elected Trustee of the Cornell Fund for three years. 



140 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1. 2008 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Calvin Perry, 25 
Timothy Drive, be elected Trustee of the Cornell Fund for two years. 

Board of Selectmen: Approval 

Salaries of Elected Officials 

ARTICLE 3. To establish the salaries of the elected officers for the ensuing year or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Clerk 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the salaries of the 
elected Town Officers be established as follows: 

Town Moderator - $250.00 for each Annual Town Meeting and $60.00 for each 

Special Town Meeting except when it falls within the Annual 

Town Meeting. 
Selectmen - Chairman - $ 1 ,800.00 

Members- $1,500.00 
School Committee - Chairman - $ 1 ,800.00 

Members- $1,500.00 

The Town Clerk presided over the vote for the Moderator's salary. 

On request of the Town Clerk 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 

FY-2009 Budget 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to determine what sums of money the Town will 
raise and appropriate, including appropriations from available funds, to defray charges and 
expenses of the Town, including debt and interest, and to provide for a reserve fund for the 
Fiscal Year beginning July 1, 2008 and ending June 30, 2009 or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

ARTICLE 4 - 2008 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money for PUBLIC SAFETY by a Majority Vote: 

1 PERSONAL SERVICES 12,112,602 

2 OTHER EXPENSES 1,253,235 
TOTAL 13,365,837 

Including 274,143 in parking receipts, 60,000 in detail fees and 860,000 in ambulance 

141 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money for PUBLIC WORKS by a Majority Vote: 

3 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,605,356 

4 OTHER EXPENSES 3,786,200 
TOTAL 5,391,556 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money for PLANT AND FACILITIES by a Majority Vote: 

5 PERSONAL SERVICES 3,001,805 

6 OTHER EXPENSES 1,387,086 
TOTAL 4,388,891 

Including 70,000 in rental receipts, 45,000 from perpetual care income and 57,000 from Cemetery 
fees. 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 

the following sums of money for GENERAL GOVERNMENT by a Majority Vote: 

7 PERSONAL SERVICES 2,249,804 

8 OTHER EXPENSES 1,237,788 
TOTAL 3,487,592 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money for LIBRARY by a Majority Vote: 

9 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,988,696 

10 OTHER EXPENSES 628,600 

TOTAL 2,617,296 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 

the following sums of money for COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT by a Majority Vote: 

11 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,407,465 

12 OTHER EXPENSES 123,604 

TOTAL 1,531,069 

Including 6,000 in wetland filing fees. 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money for COMMUNITY/YOUTH SERVICES by a Majority Vote: 



13 


PERSONAL SERVICES 


684,905 


14 


OTHER EXPENSES 


283,150 




TOTAL 


968,055 



Including 525,000 and 58,964 in receipts 
from Community Services and Youth 
Services programs and activities. 



142 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 



Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money for ELDER SERVICES by a Majority Vote: 



15 PERSONAL SERVICES 


546,654 


16 OTHER EXPENSES 


158,254 


TOTAL 


704,908 


Including 77,400 in grants and 61,000 in user 




fees. 





Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money by a Majority Vote: 



17 


COMPENSATION FUND 


968,000 


18 


RESERVE FUND 


200,000 




TOTAL 


1,168,000 



Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money for SCHOOL DEPARTMENT by a Majority Vote: 

19 PERSONAL SERVICES 47,384,430 

20 OTHER EXPENSES 12,048,727 
TOTAL 59,433,157 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money for SEWER by a Majority Vote: 

21 PERSONAL SERVICES 393,691 

22 OTHER EXPENSES 1,860,312 
TOTAL 2,254,003 

Including 134,562 from Sewer reserves 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money for WATER by a Majority Vote: 

23 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,810,294 

24 OTHER EXPENSES 2,734,900 
TOTAL 4,545,194 

Including 435,000 from Water reserves 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money for GLTHS by a Majority Vote: 

GREATER LAWRENCE 

25 ASSESSMENT 362,730 
TOTAL 362,730 

143 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 



Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate 
the following sums of money for FIXED EXPENSES by a Majority Vote: 



26 


DEBT SERVICE 


13,348,695 


27 


GENERAL INSURANCE 
UNEMPLOYMENT 


635,088 


28 


COMPENSATION 


100,000 


29 


RETIREMENT FUND 


4,510,979 


30 


HEALTH INSURANCE FUND 


11,097,000 




TOTAL 


29,691,762 




GRAND TOTAL 


129,910,050 




less dedicated Revenues 


(2,664,069) 




NET TOTAL 


127,245,981 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

School Committee Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 4 - 2008 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
SPECIAL ARTICLES 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - FREE CASH 
Article 1 1 Free Cash FY 2009 



TOTAL 



$580,000.00 
$580,000.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM FREE CASH 

Article 10 Supplemental Appropriations- Health Insurance 

Supplemental Appropriations- Public Works-Other 
Article 10 Expense 

Article 10 Supplemental Appropriations- Debt Service 
Article 40 Accumulated Employee Benefit Account 
Article 22 Fireworks 

TOTAL 



$450,000.00 

$300,000.00 
$73,147.00 

$350,000.00 

$10,000.00 

$1,183,147.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - TRANSFER OF FUNDS 
Article 8 From Phillips Academy Gift Account 

To FY 2009 Capital Projects Fund 
Article 13 From Phillips Academy Gift Account 

To Stabilization Fund 



$116,000.00 
$913,953.00 



144 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1. 2008 



Article 44 From C.A. Wood Trust Fund 

To fund the William A. Wood Memorial 



RESCIND BOND AUTHORIZATIONS 



$165,000.00 



TOTAL $1,194,953.00 



NONE 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - GENERAL FUND BORROWING 

Article 24 Feasibility Study - Bancroft School 

Article 27 School Building /Renovation 

Article 28 Town Building Maintenance/Renovation 

Article 29 Lovely Field Improvements 

Article 31 Land Fill Closure 

Article 32 Bridge Repairs 

Article 36 Fire Rescue & DPW Trucks 

Article 48 Recreation Park Ballfield Lighting 

Article 50 Storm Drainage Construction & Improvements 



TOTAL 



$300,000.00 

$1,810,000.00 

$290,000.00 

$240,000.00 

$7,370,000.00 

$600,000.00 

$973,000.00 

$100,000.00 

$380,000.00 

$12,063,000.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - SEWER FUND BORROWING 

Article 33 Shawsheen River Outflow Sewer 

Article 51 Sewer Main Construction & Reconstruction 

TOTAL 

UNEXPENDED APPROPRIATIONS 

Article 12 Transfer of Funds From the Following Warrant Articles: 
Article 46, 1 992 - Water Distribution Improvements 
Article 33, 1995 - Water Distribution Improvements 
Article 63, 1998 - Fishbrook Pump Station Plans 

TOTAL 
to be appropriated to the following : 
Fishbrook Pumping Station TOTAL 



$4,000,000.00 

$500,000.00 

$4,500,000.00 



$29,053.54 

$54,182.88 

$3,578.32 

$86,814.74 

$86,814.74 



Article 49 Transfer of Funds From the Following Articles: 

Article 39, 2001 - Lewis Street Town Yard Repairs 
Article 57, 2005 - Lewis Street Town Yard Repairs 

TOTAL 
to be appropriated to the following: 
Construction of Parks and Grounds Building 

TOTAL 



$136,691.00 
$140,000.00 
$276,691.00 



$276,691.00 



145 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - CHAPTER 44 SEC. 53 1/2 REVOLVING ACCOUNTS 



Article 20A Community Development and Planning Department 

Article 20B Memorial Hall Library -Lost/Damaged Materials 

Article 20C Health Clinic 

Article 20D Division of Community Services 

Article 20E Division of Youth Services 

Article 20F Field Maintenance 

Article 20G Division of Elder Services 

Article 20H Public Safety 

Article 20 I Memorial Hall Library Audio/Visual 

Article 20 J School Photocopy Fees 

Article 20K Compost Program 

Article 20L Solid Waste 

Article20M Stormwater Management 

TOTAL 



$70,000.00 

$20,000.00 

$30,000.00 

$455,000.00 

$225,000.00 

$80,000.00 

$200,000.00 

$50,000.00 

$36,000.00 

$7,000.00 

$25,000.00 

$20,000.00 

$30,000.00 

$1,248,000.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM TAXATION 
Article 8 Capital Projects Fund FY 2009 
Article 21 Elderly/Disabled Transportation Program 



TOTAL 



$1,664,000.00 

$6,000.00 

$1,670,000.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM WATER RESERVES 
Article 10 Supplemental Appropriation- Debt Service 



$286,308.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM SEWER RESERVES 
Article 10 Supplemental Appropriation- Debt Service 



$65,000.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM OVERLAY SURPLUS 

NONE 

SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM PARKING RECEIPTS 

NONE 



A true record 
ATTEST 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



146 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

Exemption of Citizens from Proposition VA Override 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to exempt citizens 65 years and older and those with 
income less than: 

$48,000 filing as a single 
$60,000 filing head of household 
$72,000 filing jointly 

from a Proposition override of 2/4 which would increase their taxes, or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On petition of William G. Pennington and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 5 be WITHDRAWN by a 
Majority vote. 

Finance Committee: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen: Disapproval 

FY-2009 Budget - Contingent Override 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate a sum of 
$2,500,000 for all Town and School budgets for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2008 contingent 
upon the subsequent approval of a ballot question in accordance with Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 59, Section 21C (Proposition 2/4) allowing the Town to assess said sum in real 
estate and personal property taxes or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Selectmen, School Committee & Finance Committee 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 6 be WITHDRAWN by a 
Majority vote. 

School Committee: Disapproval 

Proposition 2Vi Vote for Town & School Department Budgets - $5,000,000 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate a sum, not to 
exceed Five Million Dollars ($5,000,000) for the School and Town Department Budgets for the 
fiscal year beginning July 1 , 2008 contingent upon the subsequent approval of a ballot question 
(s) allowing the Town to assess said sum in real estate and personal property taxes or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On petition of William G. Pennington and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 7 be WITHDRAWN by a 
Majority vote. 



147 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 
FY-2009 Capital Projects Fund Appropriation 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$2,530,000 for the purpose of funding the Fiscal Year 2009 appropriation for the Capital Projects 
Fund or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town raise by 
taxation the amount of $1,664,000 and transfer the amount of $1 16,000 from the Phillips 
Academy Gift account and appropriate the sum of $1,780,000 for the purpose of funding the 
Fiscal Year 2009 appropriation for the Capital Projects Fund. 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 
School Committee: Approval 

Budget Transfers 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from amounts previously appropriated at 
the 2007 Annual Town Meeting as authorized by MGL Chapter 44, Section 33B or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 9 be WITHDRAWN by a 
Majority vote. 

Supplemental Budget Appropriations 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum of money to 
supplement appropriations voted at the April 2007 Annual Town Meeting or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town transfer 
$ 823,147 from free cash, $286,308 from Water Reserves and $65,000 from Sewer Reserves and 
appropriate the sum of $450,000 to the Health Insurance Fund- FY2008, $300,000 to Public 
Works- Other Expense - FY2008 and $424,455 to Debt Service- FY2008. 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 

Free Cash 

ARTICLE 11. To see what amount the Town will vote to permit the Assessors to use in free 
cash to reduce the Fiscal Year 2009 tax rate and to affect appropriations voted at the 2008 
Annual Town Meeting. 

148 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1. 2008 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town permit 
the Assessors to use $580,000 in free cash to reduce the Fiscal Year 2009 tax rate and to affect 
appropriations voted at the 2008 Annual Town Meeting. 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 

Unexpended Appropriations 

ARTICLE 12. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended appropriations and free 
cash in the treasury. 

On request of the Town Manager as recommended by the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town transfer 
$29,053.54 from Article 46, 1992 Water Distribution improvements $54,182.88 from Article 33, 
1995 Water Distribution Improvements, and $3,578.32 from Article 63, 1998 Fishbrook Pump 
Station Plans and appropriate the sum of $86,814.74 to Fishbrook Pumping Station Construction. 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 

Stabilization Fund 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to create a Stabilization Fund for the purpose of 
funding future one-time or unforeseen costs of the Town, and to see if the Town will vote to 
transfer and appropriate a sum of money from available funds to the Stabilization Fund in 
accordance with MGL Chapter 40, Section 5B, as amended by Chapter 46, Sections 14 and 50 of 
the Acts of 2003, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 13 as 
printed in the warrant in the amount of $913,953from the Phillips Academy Gift account. 

VOTE: Declared a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 
School Committee: Disapproval 

Transfer of Funds for School Department's FY-2009 Budget 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will transfer from the Phillips Academy Fund the sum of 
$656,000 to fund a portion of the School Department's FY-2009 School Budget, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

149 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

On petition of William G. Pennington and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 14 be WITHDRAWN by a 
Majority vote. 

Finance Committee: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen: Disapproval 

Transfer from Stabilization Fund for School Department FY-2009 Budget 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will transfer from the Stabilization Fund the sum of 
$1,252,000 to fund a portion of the School Department's FY-2009 School Budget, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On petition of William G. Pennington and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 1 5 be WITHDRAWN by a 
Majority vote. 

Finance Committee: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen: Disapproval 

General Housekeeping Articles 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote the following consent articles or take any other 
action related thereto: 

A. Grant Program Authorization 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Town 
Manager to apply for, accept and enter into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of 
any funds allotted to Andover by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the U. S. Government 
under any State or Federal grant program or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

B. Road Contracts 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to enter into a contract with 
the Massachusetts Highway Department Commissioners or the Federal Government for the 
construction and maintenance of public highways in the Town of Andover for the ensuing year 
or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

C. Town Report 

To act upon the report of the Town officers or take any other action related thereto. 

150 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

On request of the Town Manager 

D. Property Tax Exemptions 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 4, Chapter 73 of the Acts 
of 1986 as amended by Chapter 126 of the Acts of 1988 to allow an additional property tax 
exemption for Fiscal Year 2009 for those persons who qualify for property tax exemptions under 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 5 or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Assessors 

E. Contracts in Excess of Three Years 

To see if the Town will vote in accordance with the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 30B, Section 12(b), to authorize the Town Manager or the Superintendent of 
Schools to solicit and award contracts for terms exceeding three years but no greater than five 
years, including any renewal, extension or option, provided in each instance the longer term is 
determined to be in the best interest of the Town by a vote of the Board of Selectmen or the 
School Committee, as appropriate, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

F. Accepting Easements 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School 
Committee to accept grants of easements for streets, water, drainage, sewer and utility purposes 
on terms and conditions the Board and the Committee deem in the best interests of the Town or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

G. Rescinding of Bond Authorizations 

To see if the Town will vote to rescind unissued bond authorizations from prior Town 
Meetings or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town approve 
the consent agenda, Articles 16A through 16F. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that Article 16G be WITFIDRAWN by a 
Majority vote. 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 



151 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 
Granting Easements 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School 
Committee to grant easements for water, drainage, sewer and utility purposes on terms and 
conditions the Board and the Committee deem in the best interests of the Town or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 17 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 

Unpaid Bills 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum of money to 
pay unpaid bills for which obligation was incurred in prior fiscal years or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the Town Accountant 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 1 8 be WITHDRAWN by a 
Majority vote. 

Chapter 90 Authorizations 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town to acquire any necessary 
easements by gift, by purchase or by right of eminent domain for Chapter 90 Highway 
Construction or any other federal or state aid program for road or sidewalk improvements or take 
any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 19 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 

Revolving Accounts 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the following revolving funds for 
certain Town departments under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2 for 
the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2008 or take any other action related thereto: 

152 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 



Revolving Fund 


Authorized to 
Spend 


Use of Fund 


Revenue 
Source 


FY-2009 Limit 


A. Community 
Development & 
Planning 
Department 


Division Heads 


Advertising legal 
hearing notice 
expenses for permit 
applications 


Applicant 
Fees 


$70,000 


B. Memorial Hall 
Library- 
Lost/Damaged 
Materials 


MHL Director 


Replacement of 
lost/damaged library 
materials 


Restitution 
payments 
/charges to 
borrower or 
patron 


$20,000 


C. Health Clinic 


Public Health 
Director 


Clinic supplies and 
other expenses 


Clinic 

participant 

fees 


$30,000 


D. Division of 

Community 

Services 


Community 
Services Director 


Trips, ticket sales and 
special programs and 
activities 


Participant 
fees 


$455,000 


E. Division of 
Youth Services 


Youth Services 
Director 


All programs and 
activities expenses, 
part-time help 


Participant 
fees 


$225,000 


F. Field 
Maintenance 


Plant and 
Facilities Director 


Field maintenance, 
upgrade and related 
expenses 


Field rental 
fees 


$80,000 


G. Division of 
Elder Services 


Elder Services 
Director 


Senior programs, 
classes and activities 


Participant 
fees 


$200,000 


H. Public Safety 


Chief of Police 


Maintenance and 
purchase of public 
safety radio and 
antennae equipment 


Lease 
agreements 
for antenna 
users 


$50,000 


I. Memorial Hall 

Library 

Audio/Visual 


MHL Director 


Purchase of 
audio/visual materials 


Rental of 
audio/visua 
1 materials 


$36,000 


J. School 
Photocopy Fees 


School Dept. 


Photocopy Center 
Costs 


External 

Private 

Groups 


$7,000 


K. Compost 
Program 


Plant & Facilities 
Director 


Offset Compost 
Monitoring and 
Cleanup Expenses 


Contractor 
permit fees, 
revenues 
from sale of 
compost 


$25,000 


L. Solid Waste 


Public Works 
Director 


Offset Trash & 
Recycling Costs 


CRT, HHW 

& Trash 
fees 


$20,000 



153 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 



M. Stormwater 


Planning Director 


Consulting and 


Applicant 


$30,000 


Management 




Environmental 
Monitoring of 
Stormwater 
Management 
Applications and 
Permits 







On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town approve 
Article 20 A through M - Revolving Accounts - as printed in the Warrant. 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 

Elderly/Disabled Transportation Program 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and raise by taxation a sum not to 
exceed $12,000 for the purpose of continuing to provide for an elderly and disabled 
transportation subsidy program or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Council on Aging 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town approve 
Article 21 as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $6000 from Taxation. 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 

Fireworks 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will provide funding in the amount of $10,000 for a 
Fireworks Program as part of the Fourth of July Program from available funds or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of Gerald H. Silverman and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town approve 
Article 22 as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $10,000 from Free Cash. 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 

Local Options Revenues 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to accept any local option taxes or other revenue 
raising options, which are made available to cities and towns through enactments of the 
Legislature, or take any other action related thereto. 

154 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 23 be WITHDRAWN by a 
Majority vote. 

Feasibility Study - Bancroft Elementary School 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate, borrow or transfer from available 
funds, a sum of money to be expended under the direction of the School Building Committee for 
the purpose of conducting a Feasibility Study: (1) to understand the extent of deficiencies 
identified in the Statement of Interest submitted to the Massachusetts School Building Authority 
for the Bancroft Elementary School, located at 15 and 21 Bancroft Road, Andover, MA and as 
shown on Andover Assessor Map 59, lots 29 and 29A; and (2) to begin to explore the 
formulation of a solution to the deficiencies which are relevant to the Statement of Interest for 
Bancroft Elementary School; and for which feasibility study the Town may be eligible for a 
grant from the Massachusetts School Building Authority. The MSBA's grant program is a non- 
entitlement, discretionary program based on need, as determined by the MSBA, and any costs 
the Town incurs in connection with the feasibility study in excess of any grant approved by and 
received from the MSBA shall be the sole responsibility of the Town, or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town appropriate the sum of 
$300,000.00 for the purpose of conducting a Feasibility Study: (1) to understand the extent of 
deficiencies identified in the Statement of Interest submitted to the Massachusetts School 
Building Authority (MSBA) for the Bancroft Elementary School, located at 15 and 21 Bancroft 
Road, Andover, MA and as shown on Andover Assessor Map 59, lots 29 and 29A; and (2) to 
begin to explore the formulation of a solution to the deficiencies which are relevant to the 
Statement of Interest for Bancroft Elementary School; and for which feasibility study the Town 
may be eligible for a grant from the Massachusetts School Building Authority, said sum to be 
expended under the direction of the School Building Committee, and to meet said appropriation 
authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow said sum under 
M.G.L. Chapter 44, or any other enabling authority and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor, provided that the Town acknowledges that the Massachusetts School Building 
Authority's grant program is a non-entitlement, discretionary program based on need, as 
determined by the MSBA, and any costs the Town incurs in excess of any grant approved by and 
received from the MSBA shall be the sole responsibility of the Town. 

VOTE: Declared a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 
School Committee: Approval 

School Facilities Maintenance Trust Fund 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to create a local fund titled "School Facility 
Maintenance Trust Fund" for the purpose of funding appropriate school facility maintenance 

155 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

projects that meet the provision of 963 CMR 2.00, Section 2.18 4(b). and further that the Town 
affirm its intent to accept all matching grant funds from the Massachusetts School Building 
Authority (MSBA) for which it qualifies, relative to the regulations outlined in 963 CMR 2.00, 
Section 2.18 4(b), and deposit said funds into the "School Facility Maintenance Trust Fund" for 
use in funding such projects, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the School Committee 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town approve 
Article 25 as printed in the Warrant. 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 
School Committee: Approval 

Trench Safety 7 Regulations 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will, pursuant to M.G.L. Chapter 82A, §2 vote to designate 
the Town Manager as the means by which the Town shall designate the Board or Officer to issue 
permits for the purpose of creating a trench as that term is defined by M.G.L. Chapter 82A, §4 
and 520 CMR 14.00 and vote that the Board of Selectmen shall have the authority' to establish 
fees for the issuance of such permits, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town approve 
Article 26 as printed in the Warrant. 

Board of Selectmen: Approval 

School Building Maintenance and Renovation 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $1,810,000 for the purpose of paying 
costs of constructing, adding to, remodeling, reconstructing and making extraordinary repairs to 
and equipping various School buildings and roofs and for the payment of all other costs 
incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, authorize the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, 
Section 7, Clauses (3) and (3 A) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or pursuant to any other 
enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the Plant and Facilities Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $1,810,000 is hereby 
appropriated to pay costs of constructing, adding to, remodeling, reconstructing and making 
extraordinary repairs to and equipping various School buildings and for the payment of all other 
costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to 



156 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

Chapter 44, Section 7, Clauses (3) and (3 A) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or pursuant to 
any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: Declared a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 
School Committee: Approval 

Town Building Maintenance and Renovation 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $290,000 for the purpose of paying 
costs of constructing, adding to, remodeling, reconstructing and making extraordinary repairs to 
and equipping various Town buildings and roofs including the Senior Center and Town Yard and 
for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this 
appropriation, authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow 
said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clauses (3) and (3 A) of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, or pursuant to any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the 
Town therefor, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Plant and Facilities Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $290,000 is hereby 
appropriated to pay costs of constructing, adding to, remodeling, reconstructing and making 
extraordinary repairs to and equipping various Town buildings including the Senior Center and 
Town Yard and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet 
this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to 
borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clauses (3) and (3 A) of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, or pursuant to any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or 
notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: Declared a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 

Lovely Field Improvements 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $290,000 for the purpose of paying 
costs of replacing outdoor lighting and track at Lovely Field, and for the payment of all other 
costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, authorize the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow said sum under and pursuant to 
Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the 
Town therefor, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Plant and Facilities Director 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $240,000 is hereby 
appropriated to pay costs of replacing outdoor lighting and the track at Lovely Field, and for the 
payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under 
and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clauses (14) and (25) of the Massachusetts General Laws, 
or pursuant to any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: Declared a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 

Zoning Bylaw Amendment - Home Occupation 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law - Section 10.0, 
Customary Home Occupation, and Section 5.2.7.1, Permitted Signs in all Zoning Districts 
(respectively): 

To see if the Town of Andover will vote to amend Section 10.0 of the Andover Zoning By- 
law Article VIII, by deleting the following language: 

CUSTOMARY HOME OCCUPATION: Use of a room or rooms in a dwelling or accessory 
building by permanent residents for the practice of a customary home occupation, provided that 
such practice does not involve (a) sale of articles not produced on the premises; (b) exterior 
storage or display; (c) alteration of the residential character of the premises; (d) noise, heat, 
vibration or other objectionable effects discernible at the property line; or (e) the employment of 
more than one person not a member of the resident family. The following are some of the 
occupations excluded from this definition: Beautician, barber, real estate salesman, dancing or 
musical instructor to more than one person at a time. 

And replacing it with: 

"CUSTOMARY HOME OCCUPATION: Use of a room or rooms in a dwelling or accessory 
building operated by a person residing on the premises for the practice of a home occupation, 
provided that such practice does not involve: 

(a) the use of more than 33 1/3 % of the gross floor area of the building up to a 
maximum of 1 000 gross square feet; 

(b) the display or exterior announcement of the home occupation except for a single 
unlighted sign affixed to the residence no larger than two square feet; the sign 
shall conform in all other ways to the relevant portions of the Town bylaws; 

(c) alteration of the residential character of the premises; 

(d) noise, heat, vibration, glare, fumes, odors or electrical or electronic interference, 
including interference with radio or television reception, or other objectionable 
effects discernible at the property line not normally associated with residential 
use; 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

(e) the employment of more than one person not a member of the resident family; 

(f) the parking of commercial vehicles on site, except as allowed in §3.2.1.3 & 
§3.2.1.4 of the Bylaw; 

(g) adult use (as defined in Section §10.0 of the Bylaw) 

(h) generating any solid waste or sewage discharge in volume or type which is not 
normally associated with residential use in the neighborhood." 

And to revise Section 5.2.7.1 Permitted Signs in All Zoning Districts, by deleting the following: 

One sign, either attached or freestanding, indicating only the name of the owner or 
occupant, street number and permitted uses or occupations engaged in thereon, not to exceed 2 
square feet in area; requires no sign permit. 

And replacing it with: 

"One sign, not requiring a sign permit, either attached or freestanding, indicating only the 
name of the owner or occupant, and street number and not to exceed 2 square feet in area, except 
if the sign indicates a home occupation the sign must be unlighted and affixed to the residence." 

And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was MOVED that the Town approve Article 30 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to amend Article 30 by deleting the words: 

"And to revise Section 5.2.7.1 Permitted Signs in All Zoning Districts, by deleting the following: 
One sign, either attached or freestanding, indicating only the name of the owner or occupant, 
street number and permitted uses or occupations engaged in thereon, not to exceed 2 square feet 
in area; requires no sign permit. 

And replacing it with: 

One sign, not requiring a sign permit, either attached or freestanding, indicating only the name of 
the owner or occupant, and street number and not to exceed 2 square feet in area, except if the 
sign indicates a home occupation the sign must be unlighted and affixed to the residence." 

The amendment was APPROVED by a Majority vote. 

The amended article was APPROVED. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

VOTE: Declared a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen: Approval 
Planning Board: Approval 

Ledge Road Landfill Closure 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $7,370,000 for the 
purpose of capping and closure of the Town landfill on Ledge Road and the payment of any and 
all other costs incidental and related thereto and to meet this appropriation the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to 
Chapter 44, Section 8, Clause (24) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling 
authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was MOVED that the sum of $7,370,000 is hereby 
appropriated to pay costs of capping and closure of the Town landfill on Ledge Road, and for the 
payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under 
and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 8, Clause (24) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or 
pursuant to any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to close debate. 
The motion passed by a 2/3 vote. 

Article 31 was APPROVED 

VOTE: Declared a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 
Board of Health: Approval 

Bridge Repairs 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $600,000 for the purpose of paying 
costs of bridge repairs in and for the Town, and for the payment of all other costs incidental and 
related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen, to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause 
(4) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or 
notes of the Town therefor, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $600,000 is hereby 
appropriated to pay costs of bridge repairs in and for the, and for the payment of all other costs 
incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to 
Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (4) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or pursuant to any other 
enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: Declared a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 

Shawsheen River Outfall Sewer 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise by borrowing and appropriate $4,000,000 
for the purpose of paying costs of constructing and reconstructing the Shawsheen River Outfall 
Sewer, including, but not limited to, all costs associated with design, construction, land 
acquisition by eminent domain, and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related 
thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (1) 
of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes 
of the Town therefor, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $4,000,000 is hereby 
appropriated to pay costs of constructing and reconstructing the Shawsheen River Outfall Sewer, 
including, but not limited to, all costs associated with design, construction, land acquisition by 
eminent domain, and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to 
meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized 
to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (1) of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, or pursuant to any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the 
Town therefor. 

VOTE: Declared a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 
Board of Health: Approval 

Statute Acceptance - Priority Development Sites 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will accept the provisions of Chapter 43 D of the 
Massachusetts General Laws as amended pursuant to Section 1 1 of Chapter 205 of the Acts of 
2006, and to approve the filing of application with the Interagency Permitting Board for the 
designation of land at 1350 South Street (Map 184, Parcel 1, 35.08 acres) and 1350R South 
Street (Map 184, Parcel 2, 5.89 acres) as a Priority Development Site (Site Map on file in the 
Town Clerk's Office), or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 34 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: YES: 338 NO: 5 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 
Conservation: Approval 

General Bylaw - Outdoor Dining 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General Bylaws of the Town, by 
adding the following: 

"OUTDOOR DINING LICENSE BYLAW 

Section 1.1 Purpose, Scope, Authority 

The purpose of this bylaw is to provide for the licensing of outdoor dining areas of 
appropriate design, configuration, and appearance that will be an amenity to the Town during the 
spring, summer and fall. The Board of Selectmen may issue annual outdoor dining licenses 
which shall be for the period from April 1 to October 3 1 . Licenses shall be valid for one season, 
and must be re-applied for annually. 

Section 1.2 Conditions of the License 

The Board of Selectmen shall impose such conditions on each license as the Board 
determines to be appropriate and in the best interest of the Town. License fees shall be 
established by the Board of Selectmen. The Board of Selectmen may also make such regulations 
governing outdoor dining licenses as the Board considers to be necessary or appropriate to carry 
out the purposes of this bylaw. 

Section 1.3 Design and Appearance 

Outdoor dining areas containing nine (9) or more seats shall be separated from their 
surroundings by a perimeter fence or barrier. No such fences or barriers may damage the public 
sidewalk. Perimeter treatments, umbrellas, furniture and trash receptacles shall be supplied by 
the applicant and shall be maintained in a safe and sanitary manner by the applicant. All trash 
receptacles shall be covered and trash removed nightly. All perimeter treatments, umbrellas, 
furniture and trash receptacles must be removed at the end of each season. 

All outdoor dining furniture, umbrellas, perimeter fences or barriers and trash receptacles 
along Main Street and within 100 feet of Main Street's sidewalk between Locke and Lewis 
Street can be placed on the public sidewalk at 6:00 a.m. and must be removed by the owner by 
11:00 p.m. 

Section 1.4 Pedestrian and Wheelchair Passage 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

In no event shall the placement of outdoor dining furniture, umbrellas, perimeter fences 
or barriers create a pedestrian or wheelchair passage width of less than four (4) feet. Restaurants 
shall have an accessible path of travel through the dining area at least thirty-six (36) inches wide. 

Section 1.5 

Outdoor food preparation shall not be allowed unless approved by the Board of Health in 
accordance with their procedures and regulations. 

Section 1.6 Other Licenses and Approvals 

Approval of an outdoor dining area license shall not be construed as an approval of any 
other license or an approval for the alteration or extension of premises where alcoholic beverages 
are served. The serving or consumption of alcohol outside of premises duly licensed to serve 
alcohol is expressly forbidden unless approved by the Board of Selectmen. 

Section 1.7 Temporary Seating 

Due to the seasonal and temporary nature of an outdoor dining area, the seating within an 
outdoor dining area will not be considered an increase in the number of seats serving a restaurant 
or eating establishment, and will not be counted toward any off-street parking requirement. 

SECTION 2 - SUBMISSION AND APPROVAL OF APPLICATION 

Section 2.1 Filing Procedure 

Application for outdoor dining licenses shall be made to the Board of Selectmen and a 
copy shall be submitted to the Board of Health and Public Safety Officer for their review. When 
located within the General Business and Mixed Use Zoning Districts the applicant shall consult 
with the Design Review Board prior to seeking a license. Each application will include the 
name, address and telephone number of the restaurant owner, the proposed dates and times of 
operation, and a plan meeting the requirements of Section 2.2 below. 

Section 2.2 Plan Requirements 

A neatly drawn scaled plan and seven (7) copies shall be submitted with the application 
depicting the precise dimensions and location of the outdoor dining area; the arrangement of 
outdoor dining furniture, perimeter fencing, umbrellas, and any other obstruction, and the width 
of sidewalk available for pedestrian and wheelchair passage. The plan will also include a written 
description of the colors and materials to be used in the outdoor dining area. Photographs or 
samples of proposed furniture and materials shall be provided upon request of the Board of 
Selectmen or Design Review Board. 

Section 2.3 Insurance 

The licensee shall carry or require that there be carried Workers' Compensation 
Insurance for all employees and those of its contractors and/or subcontractors engaged in work at 
the dining facility, in accordance with the State Workers' Compensation Laws. The licensee 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

shall, prior to the issuance of the license, furnish a certificate of insurance to the Town 
evidencing coverage for Workers' Compensation Insurance. In addition, the licensee shall carry 
Comprehensive Public Liability and Property Damage Liability Insurance and, if applicable, 
liquor liability insurance, to cover the licensee and its contractors and subcontractors against 
claims due to accidents which may occur or result from operations under the license. Such 
insurance shall cover the use of all equipment related to the provision of sidewalk dining 
services. The Comprehensive General Liability Policy shall insure against all claims and 
demands for bodily injury and property damage with respect to the sidewalk dining facilities and 
services, and shall be in such form and amount as determined by the Board of Selectmen. The 
Town shall be named as an "additional insured" in all policies for such insurance. The licensee 
(and their heirs, successors and assigns in interest) shall also agree to hold harmless, defend and 
indemnify the Town of Andover and its employees and agents from any responsibility, liability 
and claims arising out of or related to the operations under the license. Where such insurance is 
renewed or replaced the licensee shall furnish the Town with a certificate of insurance 
evidencing the same. 

Section 2.4 Approval 

The Board of Selectmen may approve an outdoor dining license after determining that the 
design and location of an outdoor dining area is suitable to its environs, and that all other 
requirements of the license have been met. The Board of Selectmen shall consider any 
comments made by the Board of Health, Safety Officer or Design Review Board prior to 
rendering a decision. 

Upon approval of an outdoor dining area license by the Board of Selectmen, the owner 
and operator of the restaurant and the Board of Selectmen shall sign a License Agreement 
prepared for these purposes by Town Counsel and shall pay any applicable license fee prior to 
the commencement of any activities under the license. 

SECTION 3 - SEVERABILITY 

Section 3.1 

If any provisions, paragraphs, sentence, or clause of this bylaw shall be held invalid for 
any reason, all other provisions shall continue in full force and effect." 

And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the Town approve 
Article 35 as printed in the Warrant. 

Board of Selectmen: Approval 
Planning Board: Approval 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1. 2008 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn at 9:55 P.M., until 
Thursday, at 7:00 P.M. at the Collins Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - May 1, 2008 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed three hundred forty two (342) voters were 
admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order at 7:02 P.M. by Sheila M. Doherty, Moderator. 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit forty-six (46) non- voters to the meeting and to 
escort non- voters to the non- voter section thereafter. 

Brian Major, Chairman of the Board of Selectman introduced the 2008 Virginia Cole Award 
winner, Mr. Donald Robb, 36 York Street. 

Mr. Robb and his wife Vickie moved to Andover in 1 975 and raised 6 children. His professional 
life included careers as a Foreign Language teacher in Ohio and New Jersey and finished his 
career as an educational publisher. He retired in 2003. Through the years, he combined those 
two loves by writing multiple history books for children. 

Mr. Robb has served our community in many volunteer capacities over the last 33 years some of 
which were: 

• From 1978-1988, he served on the Andover School Committee - two of those years as its 
Chairman. 

• From 1989-1999, he served on the Finance Committee, the final two years as its 
Chairman. During that tenure, he helped to steer the direction for the two new schools in 
West Andover. 

• A member of the Board of Directors of the Andover Historical Society, where he 
currently serves as President. 

• A member of the Andover Cultural Council. 

• He performs with the Senior Center's Sunrise Singers. 

• He has volunteered with the Andover Sister Towns Association. 

• He has served as co-chair of the Senior Center Task Force, bringing a plan and a vision 
for a new Senior Center to the voters of Andover. 

• He is currently a member of the Friends of the Andover Senior Center. 

• He has served for two years as the Chairman of the "Andover Days" annual event. 

• He serves as a member of the advisory group for the Shawsheen Renaissance project. 

• He lectures regularly at Andover High School about town politics 

• He has presented lessons in local history on the TV show "There's Something About 
Andover", produced by Senior Center volunteers, and seen on local access cable. 

• He has served for several years as a Board Member of the Merrimack Valley YMCA 
Camping Services division. 

School Committee Chairman, Arthur Barber presented School Committee member David S. 
Samuels with a recognition award for his three year term of office on the Board. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

The Moderator announced various house keeping issues to the meeting members, including 
turning off cell phones, the introduction of the Ombudsman, Christopher Vrountas, the use of 
Pro and Con Microphones, the location of microphones, stage participants and the location of 
voting sections. 

Fire Rescue and DPW Vehicles 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $973,000 for the purchase 
of departmental equipment including a fire pumper, ambulance and DPW trucks including the 
payment of any and all other costs incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to 
borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (9) of the General Laws as 
amended and supplemented, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the 
Town therefor, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Fire Chief and Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $973,000 is hereby 
appropriated to pay costs of purchasing departmental equipment including a fire pumper, 
ambulance and DPW trucks, and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto; 
and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is 
authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (9) of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, or pursuant to any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or 
notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: Declared a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 

DPW - Sewer Division - Vehicle 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to raise by borrowing and appropriate the sum of 
$200,000 for the purpose of acquiring an infrastructure maintenance vehicle or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was MOVED that Article 37 be WITHDRAWN. 
It was voted NOT TO WITHDRAW Article 37 by a Majority vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was MOVED that the sum of $200,000 is hereby 
appropriated to pay costs of purchasing an infrastructure maintenance vehicle, and for the 
payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under 
and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (9) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or 
pursuant to any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 



166 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 
Article 37 was DEFEATED 
VOTE: YES: 152 NO: 123 A 2/3 vote was required 

Finance Committee: Approval 

General Bylaw - Stormwater Management 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General Bylaws of the Town, by 
adding the following: 

" Stormwater Management & Erosion Control Bylaw" 

1. Purpose and Objective 

The United States Environmental Protection Agency has identified sedimentation and 
polluted stormwater runoff from land disturbance, land development and redevelopment 
activities as major sources of water pollution. 

The purpose of this Bylaw is to prevent or dimmish the impacts of sedimentation and 
polluted stormwater from land disturbance, land development and redevelopment 
activities by controlling runoff and preventing soil erosion and sedimentation from site 
construction and development. The bylaw is necessary to protect the Town of Andover 
water bodies and groundwater resources, to safeguard the health, safety, and welfare of 
the general public and protect the natural resources of the Town. 

The objectives of this bylaw are to comply with State and Federal statutes and regulations 
relating to stormwater discharges, and to establish the Town of Andover' s legal authority 
to ensure compliance with the provisions of this Bylaw through inspections, monitoring 
and enforcement by: 

1 . protecting water resources; 

2. controlling the volume and rate of stormwater; 

3. requiring practices to manage and treat stormwater runoff generated from new 
development and redevelopment; 

4. protecting groundwater and surface water from degradation or depletion; 

5. promoting infiltration and the recharge of groundwater; 

6. preventing pollutants from entering the municipal and private storm drain system; 

7. preventing flooding and erosion to abutting properties; 

8. ensuring that soil erosion and sedimentation control measures and stormwater 
runoff management practices are incorporated into site planning and design 
process and are implemented and maintained; 

9. ensuring adequate long-term operation and maintenance of stormwater best 
management practices; and 

1 0. requiring practices to control waste such as discarded building materials, concrete 
truck washout, chemicals, litter, and sanitary waste at construction sites that may 
cause adverse impacts to water quality. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

2. Definitions 

ABUTTER: The owner(s) of land adjacent to the land disturbance site. 

AGRICULTURE: The normal maintenance or improvement of land in agricultural or 
aquacultural use, as defined by the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act (M.G.L. c. 
131 § 40) and its implementing regulations (310 CMR 10.00). 

ALTERATION OF DRAINAGE CHARACTERISTICS: Any activity on an area of land 
that changes the water quality, or the force, quantity, direction, timing or location of 
runoff flowing from the area. Such changes include, but are not limited to: change from 
distributed runoff to confined, concentrated discharge; change in the volume of runoff 
from the area; change in the peak rate of runoff from the area; and change in the recharge 
to groundwater on the area. 

APPLICANT: Shall be the owner of record of all of the land shown on any plan 
submitted for approval to the Planning Board in accordance with the Stormwater 
Management Bylaw and Regulations. 

AUTHORIZED ENFORCEMENT AGENCY: The Town of Andover Planning Board, 
its employees or agents designated to enforce this Bylaw. 

BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICE (BMP): An activity, procedure, restraint, or 
structural improvement that helps to reduce the quantity or improve the quality of 
stormwater runoff. 

CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION: A document issued by the Planning Board which 
confirms that all documents and final reports have been submitted and all work required 
by the terms of a Stormwater Management Permit has been satisfactorily completed in 
accordance with this Bylaw and its Regulations. 

CONSTRUCTION AND WASTE MATERIALS: Excess or discarded building or 
construction site materials that may adversely impact water quality, including but not 
limited to concrete truck washout, chemicals, litter and sanitary waste. 

CLEARING: Any activity that removes the vegetative surface cover and/or organic 
layer. Clearing activities generally include grubbing activity as defined below. 

DESIGNATED AGENT: Any person or entity designated by the Planning Board and 
approved by the Town Manager to assist in the administration, implementation and 
enforcement of the Stormwater Management and Erosion Control Bylaw and 
Regulations. 

DESIGN CRITERIA: Engineering design criteria as contained in the Stormwater 
Regulations authorized under this Bylaw. 

DETENTION: The temporary storage of storm runoff. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

DEVELOPMENT: The modification of land to accommodate a new use or expansion of 
use, usually involving construction. 

DISTURBANCE OF LAND: Any action, including clearing and grubbing, that causes a 
change in the position, location, or arrangement of soil, sand, rock, gravel, or similar 
earth material. 

ENVIRONMENTAL SITE MONITOR: A Professional Engineer or other trained 
professional selected by the Planning Board or its designee and retained by the Planning 
Board at the permit holder's expense to periodically inspect the work and report to the 
Planning Board. 

EROSION: The wearing away of the land surface by natural or artificial forces such as 
wind, water, ice, gravity, or vehicle traffic and the subsequent detachment and 
transportation of soil particles. 

ESTIMATED HABITAT OF RARE WILDLIFE AND CERTIFIED VERNAL POOLS: 
Habitats delineated for state-protected rare wildlife and certified vernal pools for use with 
the Wetlands Protection Act Regulations (310 CMR 10.00) and the Forest Cutting 
Practices Act Regulations (304 CMR 1 1.00). 

GRADING: Changing the level or shape of the ground surface. 

GRUBBING: The act of clearing land surface by digging up roots and stumps. 

IMPERVIOUS SURFACE: Any material or structure on or above the ground that limits 
water infiltrating the underlying soil. Impervious surface includes without limitation: 
roads, paved parking lots, sidewalks, sports courts and rooftops. Impervious surface also 
includes soils, gravel driveways, and similar surfaces with a runoff coefficient (Rational 
Method) greater than 85. 

LAND-DISTURBING ACTIVITY or LAND DISTURBANCE: Any activity, including 
clearing and grubbing, that causes a change in the position or location of soil, sand, rock, 
gravel, or similar earth material. 

MASSACHUSETTS ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT: (M.G.L. c. 131 A) and its 
implementing regulations at (321 CMR 10.00) which prohibit the "taking" of any rare 
plant or animal species listed as Endangered, Threatened, or of Special Concern. 

MASSACHUSETTS STORMWATER MANAGEMENT POLICY: The Policy issued by 
the Department of Environmental Protection, as amended, that coordinates the 
requirements prescribed by state regulations promulgated under the authority of the 
Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act MGL c. 131 s. 40 and the Massachusetts Clean 
Waters Act MGL c. 21, ss. 23-56. 

MASSACHUSETTS WETLANDS PROTECTION ACT: (M.G.L. c.131 s. 40) and its 
implementing regulations (310 CMR 10.00) 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

MUNICIPAL STORM DRAIN SYSTEM or MUNICIPAL SEPARATE STORM 
SEWER SYSTEM (MS4): The system of conveyances designed or used for collecting or 
conveying stormwater, including any road with a drainage system, street, gutter, curb, 
inlet, piped storm drain, pumping facility, retention or detention basin, natural or man- 
made or altered drainage channel, reservoir, and other drainage structure that together 
comprise the storm drainage system owned or operated by the Town of Andover. 

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE PLAN: A plan developed by a Massachusetts 
licensed professional engineer (PE) describing the functional, financial and 
organizational mechanisms for the ongoing operation and maintenance of a stormwater 
management system to ensure that it continues to function as designed. 

OUTFALL: The point at which stormwater flows out from a discernible, confined point 
source or concentrated conveyance into waters of the Commonwealth. 

OUTSTANDING RESOURCE WATERS (ORWs): Waters designated by Massachusetts 
Department of Environmental Protection as ORWs. These waters have exceptional 
sociologic, recreational, ecological and/or aesthetic values and are subject to more 
stringent requirements under both the Massachusetts Water Quality Standards (314 CMR 
4.00) and the Massachusetts Stormwater Management Standards. ORWs include vernal 
pools certified by the Natural Heritage Program of the Massachusetts Department of 
Fisheries and Wildlife and Environmental Law Enforcement, all Class A designated 
public water supplies with their bordering vegetated wetlands, and other waters 
specifically designated. 

OWNER: Shall be the owner of record of all the land shown on any plan submitted. The 
owner shall submit the title reference or references from the Essex County Registry of 
Deeds indicating the owner of record. 

PAVEMENT: The surface of an area which consists of bituminous concrete, cement 
concrete, or paving bricks made of masonry or stone. 

PAVING, OVERLAY: The placement of pavement on top of an existing impervious 
surface. The underlying impervious surface is sometimes milled (partially ground down 
in thickness) before the overlay is placed. 

PAVING, RECLAMATION: A procedure whereby existing pavement is broken and 
pounded into small fragments. 

PERMITTEE: The person who holds a Stormwater Management Permit and therefore 
bears the responsibilities and enjoys the privileges conferred thereby. 

PERSON: An individual, partnership, association, firm, company, trust, corporation, 
agency, authority, department or political subdivision of the Commonwealth or the 
federal government, to the extent permitted by law, and any officer, employee, or agent 
of such person. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

RECHARGE: Addition of stormwater runoff to the groundwater by natural or artificial 
means. 

REDEVELOPMENT: Development, rehabilitation, expansion, demolition or phased 
projects that disturb the ground surface or increase the impervious area on previously 
developed sites. 

RESPONSIBLE PARTIES: Owner(s), persons with financial responsibility, and persons 
with operational responsibility. 

RETENTION: The holding of stormwater runoff in a basin without release except by 
means of evaporation, infiltration, or emergency bypass. 

RUNOFF: Rainfall, snowmelt, or irrigation water flowing over the ground surface. 

SEDIMENT: Mineral or organic soil material that is transported by wind or water, from 
its origin to another location; the product of erosion processes. 

SEDIMENTATION: The process or act of deposition of sediment. 

SITE: Any lot or parcel of land or area of property where land-disturbing activities are, 
were, or will be performed. 

SLOPE: The incline of a ground surface expressed as a ratio of horizontal distance to 
vertical distance. 

SOIL: Earth materials including duff, humic materials, sand, rock, silt, clay and gravel. 

STABILIZATION: The use, singly or in combination, of mechanical, structural, or 
vegetative methods, to prevent or retard erosion. 

STORMWATER: Stormwater runoff, snow melt runoff, surface water runoff and 
drainage. 

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT PERMIT: A permit issued by the Planning Board 
pursuant to this By-Law. 

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT PLAN AND NARRATIVE: A document containing 
narrative, drawings and details prepared by a Massachusetts licensed qualified 
professional engineer (PE) which includes structural and non-structural best management 
practices to manage and treat stormwater runoff generated from regulated development 
activity. A Stormwater Management Plan also includes an Operation and Maintenance 
Plan describing the maintenance requirements for structural best management practices. 

STRIP: Any activity which removes the vegetative ground surface cover, including tree 
removal, clearing, grubbing, and storage or removal of topsoil. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

TSS: Total Suspended Solids. Material, including but not limited to trash, debris, soils, 
sediment and sand suspended in stormwater runoff. 

VERNAL POOLS: Temporary bodies of fresh water which provide critical habitats for a 
number of vertebrate and invertebrate wildlife species. 

WATERCOURSE: A natural or man-made channel through which water flows, including 
a river, brook, or stream. 

WETLAND RESOURCE AREA: Areas specified in the Massachusetts Wetlands 
Protection Act M.G.L. c. 131, s.40 and Regulations promulgated thereunder and in the 
Town of Andover Wetland Protection By-law and Regulations. 

WETLANDS: Wet meadows, marshes, swamps, bogs, areas where groundwater, flowing 
or standing surface water or ice provide a significant part of the supporting substrate for a 
plant community for at least five months of the year; emergent and submergent 
communities in inland waters; that portion of any bank which touches any inland water. 

Authority 

This Bylaw is adopted under authority granted by the Home Rule Amendment of the 
Massachusetts Constitution, the Home Rule statutes, and pursuant to the regulations of 
the federal Clean Water Act found at 40 CFR 1 22.34. 

Applicability 

A. No person may undertake a construction activity that results in a land disturbance 
of 43,560 square feet or more without a Stormwater Management Permit from the 
Planning Board. 

(1) Land Disturbances 

Land disturbances of 43,560 square feet or more, including multiple 
separate activities which in aggregate disturb 43,560 square feet or more 
whether on one parcel or adjacent parcels held in common ownership shall 
require a Stormwater Management Permit. 

(2) Paving and Impervious Material 

An increase of new pavement or other impervious material, reclamation of 
existing pavement, or a combination of both totaling 43,560 square feet or 
more shall require a Stormwater Management Permit. 

(3) The Town of Andover is not exempt from the provisions of this Bylaw. 

B. Exempt Activities 

The following activities are exempt from the requirements of this Bylaw: 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1. 2008 

(1) Normal maintenance and improvement of Town owned public ways, 
appurtenances to the public ways, and private and public utilities. 

(2) Normal maintenance and improvement of land in agricultural use. 

(3) Repair of septic systems when required by the Board of Health or the 
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection for the protection 
of public health. 

(4) Normal maintenance of currently existing landscaping, gardens or lawn 
areas associated with an existing use. 

(5) Overlaying of existing impervious surface. 

(6) Areas of land that have had a Stormwater Management review and 
approval either through the Conservation Commission or Planning Board 
using Design Criteria that at a minimum complies with the latest edition of 
the Massachusetts Stormwater Management Policy or with Design Criteria 
as described in Town of Andover's Subdivision Rules and Regulations or 
with the Town of Andover Stormwater Management and Erosion Control 
Regulations, whichever is more stringent in the protection of the Town's 
resources. 

Administration 

A. The Planning Board as the permit granting authority shall administer, implement, 
and enforce this bylaw. Any powers granted to or duties imposed upon the 
Planning Board in this bylaw may be delegated to designated agents upon a 
majority vote of the Planning Board. Should the Planning Board designate an 
agent, such agent shall be approved by the Town Manager. 

B. The Planning Board may adopt and periodically amend rules and regulations to 
effectuate the purposes of this Bylaw. Failure by the Board to promulgate such 
rules and regulations shall not have the effect of suspending or invalidating this 
Bylaw. 

(1) Adoption of and revisions to Regulations may only be made after 
conducting a public hearing to receive comments on any proposed 
revisions. Such hearing dates shall be advertised in a newspaper of general 
local circulation, at least fourteen (14) days before the hearing date. 

C. The Planning Board shall refer to the criteria and information, including 
specifications and standards, of the latest edition of the Massachusetts Stormwater 
Management Policy, or to the Design Criteria as described in the Town of 
Andover's Subdivision Rules and Regulations, or to the Town of Andover 
Stormwater Management and Erosion Control Regulations, whichever is more 
stringent in the protection of the Town's environmental and infrastructure 
resources, for execution of the provisions of this Bylaw. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

D. The Planning Board may waive strict compliance with any requirement of this 
Bylaw or the Regulations promulgated hereunder, where: 

(1) such action is allowed by federal, state or local statutes and/or regulations; 
and 

(2) is in the public interest; and 

(3) is not inconsistent with the purpose and intent of this Bylaw and its 
Regulations. 

Permits & Procedures 

Projects requiring a Storm water Management Permit shall be subject to the Town of 
Andover Stormwater Management and Erosion Control Regulations promulgated under 
Section 5 of this bylaw in addition to the procedures as set forth below: 

A. Application 

(1) An application package shall be filed with the Planning Board and other 
departments as specified in the Regulations. 

(2) The Planning Board shall review the application for completeness and 
compliance with this Bylaw and its Regulations. 

B. Public Meetings 

(1) The Planning Board shall hold a public meeting on all applications for 
Stormwater Management Permits for the purpose of reviewing the 
application and accepting public input. 

(2) Notice of the public meeting shall be given by posting and by first class 
mailings to abutters and abutters to abutters within 300 feet of the property 
line of the project site at least seven (7) days prior to the meeting. 

(3) The Board shall make the application available for inspection by the 
public during business hours at the Planning Division. 

C. Actions 

The Planning Board may: 

(1) Approve the Application and issue a permit if it finds that the proposed 
plan meets the objectives and requirements of this Bylaw and its 
Regulations; 

(2) Approve the Application and issue a permit with conditions, 
modifications, or restrictions that the Board determines meet the 
objectives and requirements of this Bylaw and its Regulations; 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

(3) Disapprove the application and deny a permit if the Planning Board finds 
that the applicant has submitted insufficient information to describe the 
site, the work, or the effect of the work on water quality and runoff 
volume; and 

(4) Disapprove the application and deny a permit if it finds that the proposed 
plan fails to meet the objectives and requirements of this Bylaw or its 
Regulations. 

D. Time for Action by the Board 

(1) Within forty-five (45) days of the filing of an application for a Stormwater 
Management Permit, the Planning Board or its designated agent shall: 

i. evaluate the application to ensure that it is complete prior to 

distribution; 
ii. distribute the complete application to boards and departments for 

technical review as specified in the Regulations; and 
iii. arrange agenda time for a public meeting before the Planning 

Board. 

(2) Within 60 days of the filing of the application, an Interdepartmental 
Review shall be held. 

i. Following the Interdepartmental review but prior to the Planning 

Board public meeting, the Town Engineer shall provide a written 
recommendation for action on the application. Such 

recommendation shall itemize all instances where the applicant has 
failed to meet the specifications and standards of the latest edition 
of the Massachusetts Stormwater Management Policy, or of the 
Design Criteria as described in the Town of Andover's Subdivision 
Rules and Regulations, or of the Town of Andover Stormwater 
Management and Erosion Control Regulations. 

(3) Within ninety (90) days of the filing of an application for a Stormwater 
Management Permit, the Planning Board shall hold a public meeting. 

(4) Once begun, the public meeting may not continue for more than sixty (60) 
days unless such time is extended by written agreement between the 
applicant and the Board to a date certain announced at the meeting. 

(5) The Planning Board shall take final action within twenty-one (21) days of 
the close of the public meeting discussion. 

E. Failure to Act 

(1) Upon certification by the Town Clerk that the allowed time has passed 
without the Planning Board's action, failure to take such action shall be 
deemed to be approval of said application and a Stormwater Management 
Permit shall be issued. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

F. Appeals of Action by the Planning Board 

(1) A written decision of the Planning Board shall be final when it is executed 
by the Planning Board or its chair or acting chair and filed in the Town 
Clerk's office. Further relief of a decision by the Planning Board made 
under this Bylaw shall be in the Superior Court or Land Court in 
accordance with the applicable law. The remedies listed in this Bylaw are 
not exclusive of any other remedies available under any applicable federal, 
state or local law. 

(2) No work shall commence until the applicable appeal period has passed 
with no appeal or if an appeal has been filed, the appeal has been finally 
resolved by adjudication or otherwise. 

G. Permit Duration 

(1) All activity permitted by this Bylaw must be completed within one-year of 
permit issuance. Extensions of time can be granted by the Planning Board 
upon formal written request by the applicant. If one year passes without 
an extension being granted, the Board may revoke the permit. 

H. Certificate of Completion 

(1) The Planning Board will issue a Certificate of Completion upon receipt 
and approval of final reports and documentation as specified in the 
Regulations. 

I. Public Record 

(1) The following documents shall be recorded at the Essex Registry of Deeds 
at the applicant's expense and proof of recording provided to the Planning 
Division. 

i. The Stormwater Management Permit 

ii. The approved Operation and Maintenance Plan 

iii. The Certificate of Completion 

7. Persons Aggrieved 

Any person aggrieved by a decision or action of a designated agent appointed by the 
Planning Board under Section 5A, including but not limited to matters regarding 
completeness of application, inspections, and compliance with technical design criteria 
may, within thirty (30) days of such decision or action, request a public meeting with the 
Planning Board. In such cases, following the decision of the Planning Board, the 
provisions of Section 6.F.1 shall apply. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1. 2008 

8. Consultants 

At the applicant's expense, the Planning Board may retain independent consultants as 
needed to advise the Board on any and all aspects of a specific project. Independent 
consultants may include but are not limited to Registered Professional Engineers and 
Environmental Site Monitors. 

9. Fees 

The Planning Board shall establish fees, subject to approval of the Board of Selectmen, to 
cover expenses connected with application review, mailings and monitoring permit 
compliance. The fees shall be sufficient to cover direct and indirect costs to the town of 
processing and reviewing the application. Provided that a revolving fund for such 
purpose is established by the town in accordance with the provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 
44, Section 53E l A, the Planning Board is also authorized to collect fees from the 
applicant in amounts sufficient to pay a Registered Professional Engineer and such other 
professional consultants as the Planning Board requires to advise the Planning Board on 
any and all aspects of the project. The fees for such professional engineers and 
consultants shall be paid to the Town for deposit into the revolving fund. 

10. Security 

Before the start of land disturbance activity, the Planning Board may require the 
permittee to post acceptable security, to insure that the work will be completed in 
accordance with the permit. The form of the security shall be approved by the Planning 
Board and shall be in an amount deemed sufficient by the Planning Board. If the project 
is phased, the Planning Board may release part of the security as each phase is completed 
in compliance with the permit but may not be fully released until the Planning Board has 
issued a Certificate of Completion. 

11. Enforcement 

A. The Planning Board or its designated agent shall enforce this Bylaw, its 
regulations, orders, violation notices, and enforcement orders, and may pursue all 
civil and criminal remedies for such violations. 

B. Entry: The Planning Board or its agents, shall have the authority, with prior 
approval from the property owner or pursuant to court process, to enter upon 
privately owned land for the purpose of performing their duties under this Bylaw. 

C. Orders: The Planning Board or its designated agent may issue a written order to 
enforce the provisions of this Bylaw or the Regulations thereunder, which may 
include: 

(1) a requirement to cease and desist from the land-disturbing activity until 
there is compliance with the Bylaw or its Regulations; 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

(2) maintenance, installation or performance of additional erosion and 
sediment control measures; 

(3) monitoring, analyses, and reporting; 

(4) remediation of erosion and sedimentation resulting directly or indirectly 
from the land-disturbing activity; 

(5) compliance with the Operation and Maintenance Plan. 

D. If the enforcing person determines that abatement or remediation of erosion and 
sedimentation is required, the order shall set forth a deadline by which such 
abatement or remediation must be completed. 

E. Criminal Penalty: Any person who violates any provision of this Bylaw, 
regulation, order or permit issued there under, shall be punished by a fine in an 
amount of $ 300.00. Each day or part thereunder that such violation occurs or 
continues shall constitute a separate offense. 

F. Non-Criminal Disposition. As an alternative to criminal prosecution or civil 
action, the Planning Board may elect to utilize the non-criminal disposition 
procedure set forth in G.L. Ch. 40, §2 ID, which has been adopted by the Town, in 
which case the Planning Board or designated agent shall be the enforcing person. 
The penalty for each violation shall be $300.00 each day or part thereof that such 
violation occurs or continues shall constitute a separate offense. 

12. Severability 

If any provision, paragraph, sentence, or clause of this Bylaw shall be held invalid for any 
reason, all other provisions shall continue in full force and effect." 

And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By- 
laws, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town approve Article 38 as 
printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen: Approval 
Planning Board: Approval 

Board of Health: Approval 
Conservation: Approval 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

Open Space Land Acquisition 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of SI, 500. 000 for the 
acquisition (and costs incidental to such acquisition) of land, conservation restrictions, easements 
or other contractual rights for conservation purposes under the provisions of Chapter 40. Section 
8C of the Massachusetts General Laws, to be managed and controlled by the Conservation 
Commission, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen and Conservation Commission to acquire 
such land and restrictions, easements and rights by gift, option, lease, purchase or eminent 
domain, and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44. Section 7(3) of 
the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefore, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Conservation Commission 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was MOVED that the Town vote to appropriate the sum 
of $900,000 to pay costs of acquiring land, conservation restrictions, easements or other 
contractual rights for conservation purposes under the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 8C of 
the Massachusetts General Laws, to be managed and controlled by the Conservation 
Commission, including the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto, and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen and Conservation Commission to acquire such land and 
restrictions, easements and rights by gift, option, lease, purchase or eminent domain, and that to 
raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized 
to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(3) of the General Laws, or any 
other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 
Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to close debate. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to close debate. 
The motion passed by a 2/3 vote. 

ARTICLE 39 was DEFEATED. 

VOTE: YES 203 NO: 112 A 2/3 vote was required 

Finance Committee: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen: Disapproval 
Conservation: Approval 

Accumulated Employee Benefit Account 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or by transfer from available 
funds and appropriate a sum not to exceed S500.000 to the Accumulated Employee Benefit 
Account for funding terminal leave liabilities upon being eligible for retirement under the 
Andover Contributory Retirement System and terminating employment with the Town, or take 
any action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Accountant 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority 7 vote that Article 40 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $350,000 from Free Cash. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 
VOTE: YES: 145 NO: 135 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 

General By-Law - Residential Anti-Blight By-law 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-laws by adding a 
Residential Anti-Blight By-law as follows: 

Residential Anti-Blight 

Findings. 

It is hereby found and declared that there exists in the Town of Andover residential properties 
that lack maintenance, contain infestation, and/or are fire hazards and/or are burdened with 
unsanitary conditions, and constitute a menace to the welfare and reasonable comforts of the 
citizens and inhabitants of the Town, which if allowed, causes blighting, a debilitating effect 
upon surrounding properties and property devaluation. 

Purpose. 

The purpose of this by-law is to prevent and eliminate residential property blight. 

Standards and Requirements in Residential Yards, Courts or Lots. 

This by-law shall apply to owners of residentially-zoned premises. All premises shall be kept 
free of collected water or the accumulation of filth, garbage, junk, waste, rubbish, refuse, trash 
and other noxious or offensive materials or substances which may cause a fire hazard or act as a 
breeding place or provide a refuge for animals, vermin or insects. Accumulations of trash or 
debris shall be deemed favorable to the harboring of mosquitoes or insects of like kind or of rats, 
mice, snakes or wild animals and reptiles of like kind. 

No owner of residentially-zoned premises will allow such premises to become or remain 
unsightly. Any one or more of the following conditions may render the property unsightly under 
this by-law: materials of any sort that are strewn about the property rather than piled in a neat 
and appropriate manner, construction materials where there is no apparent or real construction 
occurring on the residential property for which the materials are required, discarded indoor 
furniture or bedding, unused landscaping materials and unconfmed compost piles which shall be 
deemed favorable to attracting coyotes, fisher cats and other dangerous wild animals. All trash 
barrels or recycling containers shall be effectively screened from view except on days of 
collection. 

By-law Enforcement Officer. 

The By-law Enforcement Officer is the Town Manager (Code of By-laws of the Town of 
Andover, Massachusetts, Part II By-laws, Article I, Section 4. Enforcement). 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

The Town Manager has general responsibility for the enforcement of this and all Town by-laws. 
His office shall be responsible to accept, record and document all complaints, conduct 
inspections, investigate alleged violations of the provisions of this by-law and has the authority 
to issue and enforce citations for violations of this by-law. Said By-law Enforcement Officer, 
with the permission of the Board of Selectmen, may utilize the services of any qualified Town 
employee to enforce this by-law. 

Violations of the By-law. 

It is declared that violations of this by-law shall constitute a nuisance. 

Exemption. 

This by-law shall not apply to wetlands or conservation land or agricultural land and those State 
laws and Town by-laws that are related thereto as they may from time-to-time be amended. 

Violations and Penalties. 



Any owner found to be in violation of this by-law will have thirty (30) days from the date of the 
citation to remedy the violation. Any owner who remains in violation of this by-law beyond the 
thirty (30) day remedial period shall be fined One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) for each violation. 
Each day that such violation continues shall constitute a separate violation. Enforcement of this 
section may be pursued through the provisions of Section 2 ID of Chapter 40 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, which provides for a non-criminal disposition. For purposes of 
non-criminal disposition, the By-law Enforcement Officer is the enforcing person. 

Severability. 

The invalidity of any section or provision of this by-law shall not invalidate any other section or 
provision herein. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of John P. Kennedy and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was MOVED that Article 41 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to close debate. 
The motion passed by a 2/3 vote. 

Article 41 was DEFEATED: 

VOTE: Declared less than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen: Disapproval 
Department of Health: Disapproval 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

General By-Law Amendment - Finance Committee Report 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town By-Laws, Article III, Section 
3(a) by deleting from the sixth sentence "and mail to each household in the town" and 
substituting with "and cause to be made available to the citizens of the town including posting on 
the Town's web-site"; and to vote to amend the Town By-Laws by deleting Article II, Section 
4.1., and further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Committee 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town approve Article 42 as printed 
in the Warrant. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to amend Article 42 deleting the words 
"vote to amend the Town By-Laws by deleting the words Article II, Section 4.1." and replacing 
them with the following: 

"The Town Manager shall determine which households desire to opt out from receiving a printed 
version of the Finance Committee Report. If a household does not request to opt out from 
receiving a printed version, the Town will mail a printed version to that household." 

The amendment was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was MOVED to close debate. 
The motion passed by a 2/3 vote. 

The main motion was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 

Statute Acceptance - Medicare Extension Plans for Retirees 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 1 8 of Chapter 32B of the 
Massachusetts General Laws authorizing the Town to require all retirees, their spouses and 
dependents who are enrolled in Medicare Part A at no cost to a retiree, their spouse or 
dependents, or eligible for coverage thereunder at no cost to a retiree, their spouse or dependents, 
be required to enroll in a Medicare health benefits supplement plan offered by the Town, or take 
any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to WITHDRAW Article 43 by a Majority 
vote. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1. 2008 

William M. Wood Memorial 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of $165,000 from the C. A. 
Wood Trust Fund and appropriate said sum for the purpose of constructing the William M. 
Wood memorial at William M. Wood Memorial Park including costs incidental and related 
thereto, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Plant and Facilities Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 44 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant in the amount of $165,000 from the C. A. Wood Trust Fund by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 

William M. Wood Memorial Park Improvements 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, transfer from available funds, 
borrowing or by any combination thereof and appropriate the sum of $285,000 for the purpose of 
paying costs of renovation and reconstruction to the William M. Wood Memorial Park, and for 
the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Plant and Facilities Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to WITHDRAW Article 45 by a Majority 
vote. 

Finance Committee: Approval 

Sidewalk Reconstruction - Lowell Street 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote the sum of $373,000 to pay costs of reconstructing 
the sidewalks on Lowell Street from Kirkland Drive to Shawsheen Square and for the payment 
of all other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and 
pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clauses (5) and (6) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any 
other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefore, or take any other 
action thereto related thereto. 

On petition of Dorothy Gulezian and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of $373,000 is hereby 
appropriated to pay costs of reconstructing the sidewalks on Lowell Street from Kirkland Drive 
to Shawsheen Square, and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto; and 
that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is 
authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clauses (5) and (6) 
of the Massachusetts General Laws, or pursuant to any other enabling authority, and to issue 
bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

Article 46 was DEFEATED 

VOTE: Declared less than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen: Disapproval 

Conveyance and Transfer of Land - Dwight Street and School Street 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to discontinue, and to abandon unused portions of 
two existing public ways (Dwight Street and School Street) and to transfer the care, custody, 
management and control of the same and another certain parcel of land (namely the Dwight 
Street Triangle), all as hereinafter described, and the improvements, if any thereon, held by the 
Board of Selectmen and the Department of Public Works to the Board of Selectmen, for the 
purpose of conveyance of said land to Phillips Academy, in exchange for the conveyance of a 
certain parcel of land, owned by Phillips Academy, to the Town to be held under the care, 
custody, management and control of the conservation commission for conservation purposes 
pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 40 Section 8C, and to authorize the Town 
Manager and the Board of Selectmen to petition the General Court for special legislation 
authorizing said conveyances: 

Land to be conveyed to the Town: 

A certain parcel of land in the Town of Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts, being 
shown as Assessors Map 26, Lot 6, lying between Salem Street and the Route 125 Bypass, and 
containing seven acres more or less. Reference may be had to a Plan of Land entitled "Plan of 
Land in Andover, MA prepared for: Trustees of Phillips Academy, Scale 1' -60', Date: February 
8, 1999 prepared by John Abagis & Associates, Professional Land Surveyors" where the said Lot 
6 is shown thereon as "Parcel A" and as containing 342,473 s.f. +/- = 7.8621 acres. Said Lot 6 is 
to be conveyed free and clear of all encumbrances subject to such terms and conditions as the 
Selectmen deem advisable in the interest of the Town of Andover. 

Land to be conveyed by the Town: 

A. Dwight Street Triangle (Convey ) 

A certain parcel of land in the Town of Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts, being 
shown as Assessors Map 41, Lot 6, at the corner of Main Street and Dwight Street, and 
containing one acre, more or less. Reference is hereby made to a plan made January, 1949 by 
Clinton Foster Goodwin, Engineer, Haverhill, Massachusetts, said plan being recorded at the 
office of the Town Clerk, and also duly recorded at the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as 
Plan Number 2028, said land being shown on said Plan as "Park Town of Andover". Said Lot 6 
is to be conveyed subject to the rights of others, if any, including without limitation all existing 
utility easements and the 1953 Massachusetts State Highway layout takings and subject to such 
further restrictions, easements, terms and conditions as the Selectmen deem advisable in the 
interest of the Town of Andover. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1. 2008 

B. D wight Street (Discontinue, Abandon & Convey) 

Portions of an existing public way, namely Dwight Street (sometimes previously referred 
to as Back Street and/or Highland Road), which said Dwight Street runs southeasterly and 
southerly from the easterly line of South Main Street and again to the easterly side of South Main 
Street as accepted at Annual Town Meeting, March 14, 1949, Article 45, Page 326, Annual 
Town Meeting Records, said Dwight Street being more particularly described as follows: 

Northerly and Easterly Line . Beginning at a stone bound at the easterly line of South 
Main Street to the State Highway in a general southeasterly direction, by a curve to the right 
having a radius of 25 feet a distance of 16.01 feet to a stone bound; thence southeasterly 325.61 
feet to a stone bound marking an angle in the line; thence southerly 132.95 feet to a point, thence 
southerly and a little more westerly 177.6 feet to a point; thence still southerly a little more 
westerly 147.03 feet to a stone bound; thence southeasterly 149.85 feet to a Massachusetts 
Highway bound in said easterly line of South Main Street. 

Southerly and Westerly Line . Beginning at a stone bound at said easterly line of South 
Main Street, said bound being 110.51 feet northwesterly from Massachusetts Highway bound 
marking an angle in said Highway line; thence by a curve to the right having a radius of 25 feet, 
a distance of 62.53 feet to a stone bound; thence southeasterly by 163.22 feet to a stone bound; 
thence by a curve to the right having a radius of 25 feet, a distance of 28.45 feet to a stone 
bound; thence southerly 91.38 feet to a stone bound; thence southwesterly 129.17 feet to a stone 
bound; thence by a curve to the right having a radius of 25 feet, a distance of 65.14 feet to a 
stone bound and said easterly line of South Main Street 

Said street being about 40 feet in width throughout, for the greater part of its length 
where it joins South Main Street at either end of the street as herein described. 

Reference is hereby made to a plan of said road made January, 1949 by Clinton Foster 
Goodwin, Engineer, Haverhill, Massachusetts, said plan being recorded at the office of the Town 
Clerk, and also duly recorded at the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 
2028. 

Said land to be conveyed subject to the rights of others, if any, including without 
limitation all existing utility easements and the 1953 Massachusetts State Highway layout 
takings, and subject to such further restrictions, easements, terms and conditions as the 
Selectmen deem advisable in the interest of the Town of Andover; or take any other action 
related thereto. 

C. Portion of School Street (Discontinue, Abandon & Convey) 

Portions of an existing public way, School Street, namely the southern portion of School 
Street at its intersection with South Main Street, being more particularly shown on a Plan entitled 
"Plan of Land in Andover, MA showing Proposed Street Discontinuance Scale 1"=20\ Date: 
January 15, 1999", (a copy of which Plan is on file with the Town Clerk's office) and being more 
particularly described as follows: 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

Beginning at a point on the westerly sideline of South Main Street marked by a drill hole 
in a stone bound as shown on said Plan; thence running northwesterly as shown on said Plan a 
distance of 245. 1 8 feet more or less to a point; 

thence turning and running easterly as shown on said Plan 76.08 feet more or less across 
School Street as currently laid out to a point; 

thence turning and running southeasterly a distance of 78.89 feet more or less to a point; 

thence turning and running southerly as shown on said Plan along the westerly sideline of 
South Main Street as shown on said Plan a distance of 159.91 feet more or less to the drill hole in 
the stone bound marking the point of beginning. 

Said land to be conveyed subject to the rights of others, if any, including without 
limitation all existing utility easements and subject to such further restrictions, easements, terms 
and conditions as the Selectmen deem advisable in the interest of the Town of Andover; or take 
any other action related thereto. 

On petition of the Trustees of Phillips Academy and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to WITHDRAW Article 47 by a Majority 
vote. 

Recreation Park Ballfield Lighting Project 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $100,000 for the purpose of paying 
costs of replacing outdoor lighting at Recreation Park, and for the payment of all other costs 
incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, authorize the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, 
Section 7, Clause (14) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and 
to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Director of Community Services 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $100,000 is hereby 
appropriated to pay costs of replacing outdoor lighting at Recreation Park, and for the payment 
of all other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and 
pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (14) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or pursuant to 
any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: Declared a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen: No Position 

Parks and Grounds Appropriation Transfer 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1. 2008 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of $136,691 remaining in 
Article 39, 2001 Annual Town Meeting - Lewis Street Town Yard Repairs and the sum of 
$140,000 remaining in Article 57, 2005 Annual Town Meeting - Lewis Street Town Yard 
Repairs and appropriate the sum of $276,691 for the purpose of repair, reconstruction, relocation 
and/or construction of the Parks and Grounds building or take any action related thereto. 

On request of the Plant & Facilities Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was MOVED that the $136,691 remaining balance 
under Article 39 of the Warrant at the 2001 Annual Town Meeting - Lewis Street Town Yard 
Repairs and the $140,000 remaining balance under Article 57 of the Warrant at the 2005 Annual 
Town Meeting - Lewis Street Town Yard Repairs, which together total $276,691, shall be 
appropriated to pay costs of repairing, reconstructing, relocating and/or constructing the Parks 
and Grounds building, all as permitted by the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 20 of the General 
Laws. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to amend Article 49 to add a sentence at the 
end of the article reading as follows: 

"No relocation and /or construction of the Parks and Grounds building will occur within the 
boundaries of Spring Grove Cemetery." 

The Amendment was APPROVED 

VOTE: YES: 126 NO: 79 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to close debate. 
The motion passed by a 2/3 vote. 

The amended motion was APPROVED 

VOTE: Declared a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 

Storm Drainage Construction and Improvements 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $380,000 for the purpose 
of constructing and reconstructing surface drains and the payment of any and all other costs 
incidental and related thereto and to meet this appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, 
Section 7, Clause (1) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to 
issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $380,000 is hereby 
appropriated to pay costs of constructing and reconstructing surface drains, and for the payment 
of all other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and 
pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(1), of the Massachusetts General Laws, or pursuant to any 
other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: Declared a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 

Sewer Main Construction and Reconstruction 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate $500,000 for the purpose of paying 
costs of constructing and reconstructing sewer mains, including, but not limited to, all costs 
associated with design, construction, land acquisition by eminent domain, and for the payment of 
all other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this appropriation, authorize the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow said sum under and pursuant 
to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (1) of the Massachusetts General Laws, or any other enabling 
authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $500,000 is hereby 
appropriated to pay costs of constructing and reconstructing sewer mains, including, but not 
limited to, all costs associated with design, construction, land acquisition by eminent domain and 
for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto; and that to meet this 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to 
borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(1), of the Massachusetts General 
Laws, or pursuant to any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor. 

VOTE: Declared a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 

General By-law Amendment - Dog By-law 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-laws, Article XII, Section 
1 1 , by adding the following: 

"(c) 

(1) Any dog under the direct and immediate supervision of a responsible adult within 
the confines of the Town-designated Dog Park shall be determined properly 
restrained under this section. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

(p) The Board of Selectmen will make Rules and Regulations governing the use of the 
Town-designated Dog Park." 

And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Animal Control Officer 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED approve Article 52 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen: Approval 

Zoning By-law Amendment - Signs 

ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VIII of the Andover Zoning By- 
law Section 5.2 SIGNS as follows: 

In Section 5.2.3. General Regulations delete the text: 

"All freestanding or roof signs shall be registered and identified as required by Section 1407.0 
of the State Building Code." 

And replace it with the following after Section 5.2.3.2.: 

"3. Calculation of "Sign Area ". Sign area shall mean the area of the smallest horizontally 
or vertically oriented rectangle which could enclose all the display area of the sign, 
together with any backing different in color or material from the finish material of the 
building face without deduction for open space or other irregularities. Structural members 
not bearing advertising matter shall not be included unless internally or decoratively 
lighted. Only one side of projecting or freestanding signs need be included in calculating 
"sign area." 

4. Signage Plan. It is the responsibility of the applicant to verify with the owner if the 

building has an overall signage plan, and if such a plan exists, a copy of the plan must be 
included with the sign application." 

In Section 5.2.4. Prohibited Signs or Devices, delete the following: 

"1. No sign shall be lighted except by a steady, stationary light, shielded and directed solely 
at or internal to the sign." 

And replace it with the following: 

"1. No sign shall be lighted except by a steady, external and stationary light source which is 
shielded and directed solely at the sign, or by internal illumination (permitted only in 
Office Parks and Industrial districts)." 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

In Section 5.2.8, Signs Residential Districts, delete the following: 

"5.2.8 Signs in Residential Districts. In SRA, SRB, SRC, or APT District, no part of any sign 
shall be more than fifteen feet above ground level or, unless attached to a building, within ten 
feet on any street line." 

And replace it with the following: 

"5.2.8. Signs in Residential Districts. In SRA, SRB and SRC no freestanding signs are allowed 
without a special permit from the zoning board of appeals and under no circumstances can the 
sign exceed 6 (six) square feet or exceed 4' (four) feet in height above ground level. In APT 
Districts, 1 (one) free standing sign on each street where the complex has frontage provided that 
frontage has a pedestrian entry, shall be allowed identifying the housing complex, but may not 
exceed 15 (fifteen) square feet in area and may not exceed 8' (eight) feet in height, above ground 
level." 

Replace Section 5.2.10, Signs in General Business and Limited Service Districts, in its entirety 
with the following text: 

"Section 5.2.10. Signs in General Business and Limited Service Districts. The following signs 
are allowed in the GB and LS Districts: 

1. Signs as permitted in Section 5.2.7, except that temporary real estate signs may be as 
large as 25 square feet. 

2. One attached accessory sign per occupant oriented to each street and parking lot on which 
the occupant's facade has windows and/or entry directly into that occupant's space. The 
sign may be either attached flat against the wall or on a fixed canopy on the building. No 
portion of such sign shall be above the highest point of the roof or parapet. The area of 
each sign shall not exceed 15% of that portion of the wall area assigned to that occupant, 
and in no case shall a sign exceed 50 (fifty) square feet. On the parking lot facade the 
area of a sign may not exceed 25 (twenty five) square feet. 

3. In addition, each occupant may have 1 (one) projecting sign on each facade as defined 
above, not to exceed 9 (nine) square feet. No sign shall project more than 5' (five) feet 
over any public right-of-way or other public property. Any sign projecting over a public 
right-of-way shall be covered by liability insurance in the amount of two million dollars 
as verified by a certificate of insurance filed with the Town Clerk. A building with a 
setback of a minimum of 5' (five) from the public sidewalk may add 1 (one) freestanding 
sign not to exceed 6' (six) in height above ground level or 15 (fifteen) square feet in area. 

4. Individual unlighted signs, lettering, or logos not exceeding 2 (two) square feet in area, 
mounted inside windows or entry doors, not to exceed 30% (thirty) of said area of 
windows and doors, shall not require a sign permit. 

5. For premises having multiple occupants, a single directory sign attached flat or projecting 
from the building that identifies the occupants, shall be allowed. The directory sign shall 
be the lesser of 10% (ten) of the wall facade or 10 (ten) square feet." 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

Replace Section 5.2.1 1 in its entirety with the following text: 

"5.2.1 1. Signs in Mixed Use Districts. The following signs are allowed in the MU Districts: 

1. Signs as permitted in Section 5.2.7, except that temporary real estate signs may be as 
large as 25 (twenty-five) square feet. 

2. One attached accessory sign per occupant oriented to each street and parking lot on which 
the occupant's facade has windows and/or entry directly into that occupant's space. The 
sign may be either attached flat against the wall or on a fixed canopy on the building. No 
portion of such sign shall be above the highest point of the roof or parapet. The area of 
each sign shall not exceed 1 0% (ten) of that portion of the wall area assigned to that 
occupant, and in no case shall a sign exceed 80 (eighty) square feet. 

3. In addition, each occupant may have one projecting sign that does not exceed 9 (nine) 
square feet on each frontage as defined above. No sign shall project more than 5' (five) 
feet over any public right-of-way or other public property. Any sign projecting over a 
public right-of-way shall be covered by liability insurance in the amount of two million 
dollars as verified by a certificate of insurance filed with the Town Clerk. Buildings with 
a setback of a minimum of 5' (five) from the sidewalk may add one freestanding sign that 
does not exceed 8' (eight) feet in height above ground level or 15 (fifteen) square feet 
square feet in area. 

4. Individual unlighted signs, lettering, or logos not exceeding 2 (two) square feet in area, 
mounted inside windows or entry doors, that do not in total exceed 30% (thirty) of the 
area of said windows and doors, shall be excluded from the above limitations. 

5. For premises having multiple occupants, a single directory sign attached flat or projecting 
from the building that identifies the occupants, shall be allowed. The directory sign shall 
be the lesser of 10% (ten) of the wall facade or 10 (ten) square feet." 

And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Design Review Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 53 as printed in the 
Warrant. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to amend Article 53 by replacing Section 
5.2.8 Signs in Residential Districts with the following language: 

In SRA, SRB and SRC districts, no sign shall exceed 6 (six) square feet in area, and, if 
freestanding, shall not exceed 4' (four) feet in height above ground level. Exception: Signs on 
property open to the public, bearing no commercial or advertising material and displaying 
historical, cultural, environmental, or safety information pertaining to such property and/or rules 
relating to the public use thereof shall not exceed 9 (nine) square feet on any side, and, if 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

freestanding, shall not exceed 9 (nine) feet in height above ground level; provided, further, that if 
such signs do not exceed 4 (four) square feet in area, no sign permit shall be required. 

In APT districts, 1 (one) freestanding sign identifying the apartment development shall be 
allowed on each street on which the apartment development has both frontage and a pedestrian 
entry, provided such sign shall not exceed 15 (fifteen) square feet in area and shall not exceed 8' 
(eight) feet in height above ground level. 

The Amendment was APPROVED by a Majority vote. 

The amended article was DEFEATED 

VOTE: YES: 99 NO: 67 A 2/3 vote was required 

Planning Board: Disapproval 
General Bylaw - Banners 

ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to add the following General Bylaw: 
"Banners in the Greater Business District 

(1) The intent of this bylaw is to allow a temporary banner to hang above ground across or 
along Main Street within the General Business District (GBD) by vote of the Board of 
Selectmen. 

(2) Eligibility: 

a. A banner application may be submitted to the Selectmen by a Town official for a 
Town-sponsored event or by a non-profit organization seeking to display a banner 
relating to an event. 

b. Banners can only promote events that satisfy the following criteria: 

1. The event is coordinated by a non-profit organization or Town 
department; 

2. The event is held totally within town boundaries; and 

3. The organization seeking to display a banner must fill out an application 
no earlier than 12 months prior, and no later than 4 weeks prior, to the 
event. A representative of the organization must appear at a Selectmen's 
meeting to seek approval. 

c. In the case of a conflict between two events scheduled for the same time period 
the Selectmen may base their decision on the number of Andover residents which 
the event can be expected to attract. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

d. There shall be no more than one banner across or along Main Street at any one 
time. 

e. A banner may only be hung from free-standing poles as approved by the Board of 
Selectmen. The Selectmen shall determine the location of such poles. 

f. Except for a Town sponsored banner, no organization may receive more than two 
approvals for a banner in any calendar year. 

g. The Selectmen may deny an application at their discretion. 

(3) Design and construction: 

a. The banner must be a maximum of 30 feet in length and 36 inches in height. Only 
lettering and the logo of the event may be allowed on the banner. Text may 
include the name of the event, the name of the sponsoring organization, the date 
of the event and the location of the event. Neither business names nor business 
logos are permitted. 

b. The banner must be double sided with identical information on both sides. 

c. The banner must be constructed of a tear-resistant fabric (e.g. rip-stop nylon) and 
have reinforced seams on all four sides. 

d. The banner must also have U-shaped wind openings spaced 5 feet apart. Each slot 
is to have a width of at least 6 inches and reinforcing seams. 

e. The banner must have reinforced grommets every 24 inches on the top and 
bottom and sewn-in D rings in the corners. Detachable stainless steel clips that 
attach to the suspended cables must accompany each grommet. 

f. The capital letter height must be between 16 inches and 24 inches. 

(4) Installation and Removal: 

a. Except for a Town-sponsored banner, the organization seeking the banner display 
must pay a fee as determined by the Board of Selectmen to cover the cost of the 
installation and removal of the banner. 

b. The banner must be delivered to the Town no later than 3 weeks prior to the 
event. The Town will hang the banner. 

c. The banner may be approved for no more than 10 consecutive days prior to the 
event and must be removed no later than 2 business days after the event. The 
Town will remove the banner. 

d. Except for a Town sponsored banner, at the time of filing an application, the 
organization must provide a certificate of insurance, from an insurance company 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

authorized by the Commissioner of Insurance to provide insurance in the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, for a general liability policy relating to the 
installation, removal, display, and use of the banner for an amount of $2 million 
dollars naming the town as an additionally insured party. 

e. The Town of Andover assumes no responsibility for lost, stolen or damaged 

banners or for the use of such banners. Except for a Town sponsored banner, the 
organization must sign a form that indemnifies, defends and holds harmless the 
Town and its officials and employees from any claims, liabilities and damages 
that may result from the installation, display, use and removal of the banner." 

And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Selectmen 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was MOVED that the Town approve Article 54 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to amend the motion by deleting the words 
"and reinforcing seams" in Section 3d, Design and Construction. 

The amendment was APPROVED by a Majority vote. 

The Amended motion was APPROVED by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen: Approval 
Planning Board: Approval 

General Bylaw - News Boxes 

ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-laws of the Town of 
Andover by adding: 

"Private Property on Main Street Sidewalks. 

1. Purpose. 

The purpose of this by-law is to promote the public safety, aesthetics, and welfare 
through the regulation of items on Town sidewalks on or near Main Street so as to: 

a. Provide for pedestrian safety and convenience; 

b Ensure no unreasonable interference with the flow of pedestrian traffic; 

c. Provide reasonable access for emergency equipment; 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

d. Provide for snow removal and snow storage; 

e. Reduce exposure of the Town of Andover to personal injury or property damage 
claims. 

2. Definitions. 

NEWS BOX - Any free standing type of self-service device for the vending or free 
distribution of newspapers, periodicals or printed material. 

NEWS BOX DISTRIBUTION LOCATION - Reserved portion of Town land or 
sidewalks along or near Main Street allowing news boxes to remain free of charge. 

OWNER - The owner of a news box or other item placed upon the Town's sidewalks. 

3. Requirements. 

a. No permission granted by the Board of Selectmen pursuant to Article XI, Section 
3(b) of the Town's bylaws shall allow any item to be placed, affixed, erected or 
maintained on a Town sidewalk on Main Street between Locke Street and Lewis 
Street between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. or on a Town sidewalk 
within 50 feet of Main Street's sidewalk between Locke Street and Lewis Street 
between the hours of 1 1 :00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. 

b. Notwithstanding the foregoing subparagraph, or the provisions of Article XI, 
Sections 3(a) and 3(b) of the Town's Bylaws, news boxes are allowed on a Town 
sidewalk on Main Street between Locke Street and Lewis Street or on a Town 
sidewalk within 50 feet of Main Street's sidewalk between Locke Street and 
Lewis Street, free of charge, at all times and without a permit, but only at the 
News Box Distribution Locations. 

There will be a minimum of three news box distribution locations along Main 
Street between Locke Street and Lewis Street. The Board of Selectmen shall 
designate the area and design of the news box distribution locations. 

A publication may be in only one news box at each distribution location but may 
be in more than one news box distribution location. Use of the news box 
distribution location will require the owner to register, at no charge, with the 
Director of the Department of Public Works no later than 14 days after the 
placement of the news box in order to provide identification and contact 
information. News boxes may not be attached to the public sidewalk. All news 
boxes must weigh enough to ensure security and stability. The owner is 
responsible for the installation, safety and maintenance of its news boxes. The 
Town is not liable for the theft of, or damage to, the news boxes or their content. 

There will also be a limited number of spaces available, free of charge, in Town- 
owned news boxes on a first-come, first-serve basis for publishers of newspapers, 
periodicals or printed material who choose not to provide their own news boxes. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

In addition, publishers of newspapers, periodicals or printed material have the 
option to participate in an agreement between the publisher and the Town in 
creating custom news boxes along Main Street. 

c. All news boxes at news box distribution locations which do not have printed 

material contained therein for a period of 45 consecutive days, and unregistered 
news boxes, will be considered abandoned property and subject to enforcement as 
specified in Section 4. 

4. Enforcement. 

a. Enforcement of the provisions of this by-law shall be carried out by the Director 
of the Department of Public Works or such person as said Director may from time 
to time designate. 

b. If the Director determines that a violation of any provision of this by-law has 
occurred, the Director shall, if ownership of the item or news box can be 
determined, send a notice of the violation, in writing, by first class mail to the 
Owner. The notice shall include the location of the item or news box and cause of 
the violation. 

c. The notice shall inform the owner that at the expiration of thirty (30) days from 
the issuance of the violation notice, the item or news box will be removed by the 
Director unless the violation is corrected. 

d. Notwithstanding the provisions of the foregoing subparagraphs 4(a) - 4(c), the 
Director may order the immediate removal of any item or news box that the 
Director determines presents an imminent threat or peril to public safety, provided 
that the owner, if known, shall be notified of such removal as soon as practicable 
thereafter. 

e. Any item or news box which is removed shall be stored for a period of ninety (90) 
days in order to allow the owner time to come forward and claim the item or news 
box. 

f. Any item or news box removed, pursuant to this by-law, may be retrieved by the 
owner upon payment of a removal and storage fee. Such fees shall be set by the 
Board of Selectmen at a public meeting based upon the Department of Public 
Works costs for removal and storage. 

g. After an item or news box removed by the Director has been in storage for ninety 
(90) days pursuant to this by-law, the item or news box shall be deemed 
unclaimed and abandoned property and will be transferred to the police 
department for disposition in accordance with applicable law. 

5. Exemption. 

The Town, state and federal governments are exempted from this bylaw. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

6. Severability. 

The provisions of this by-law shall be severable and if any section, part, or portion hereof 
shall be held invalid for any reason by any court, the decision of such court shall not affect or 
impair any remaining section, part or portion thereof." 

And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Main Street Committee 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 55 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen: Approval 
Planning Board: Approval 

Lease of Old Town Hall 

ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to lease all or a 
portion of the land and building at the Old Town Hall at 20 Main Street for a period of not more 
than five years on terms and conditions deemed by the Selectmen to be in the best interest of the 
Town or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was MOVED to approve Article 56 as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to close debate. 
The motion passed by a 2/3 vote. 

Article 56 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee: Approval 
Board of Selectmen: Approval 

Discontinuance of Portion of Paulornette Circle as a Public Way & Conveyance of Land 

ARTICLE 57. To see if the Town will vote to discontinue as a public way and to abandon and 
to authorize the transfer of the care, custody and control of the following parcels of land, which 
are portions of the cul-de-sac on Paulornette Circle, to the Board of Selectmen for purposes of 
selling or conveying the land and to authorize the Selectmen to sell or convey the land on terms 
and conditions they deem in the best interest of the Town, even if the Town receives no financial 
payment: 



197 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 30, MAY 1, 2008 

The area shown as "Street to be Abandoned to be Conveyed to Jeffrey M. Wolf, 948 SF" and the 
area shown as "Street to be Abandoned - 5,936 SF." Both areas are shown on a plan entitled, 
"Subdivision Plan of Land in Andover, Mass. Entitled Monette Circle; Engineer: Merrimack 
Engineering Services, 66 Park Street, Andover, MA; Applicant/Owner: 7-10 Paulornette Realty 
Trust, dated December 1, 2006, revised July 27, 2007." A copy of said plan is on file with the 
Andover Town Clerk's Office. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of Mark B. Johnson and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 57 as printed in the 
Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen: Approval 
Planning Board: Approval 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Thomas Urbelis and duly seconded it was voted by a 
Majority vote to dissolve the Annual Town Meeting at 10:46 P.M. 

A true record 

ATTEST 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



198 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR DEN 


10CRA 


TIC PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY ANDOVER MA 02/05/2008 




PCT1 


PCT2 


PCT3 


PCT4 


PCT 5 PCT 6 


PCT 7 1 


PCT 8 


PCT 9 


Totals 


PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 






















JOHN R EDWARDS 


11 


7 


9 


10 


11 


9 


6 


4 


14 


81 


HILLARY CLINTON 


317 


372 


408 


292 


347 


343 


387 


314 


360 


3140 


JOSEPH R BIDEN, JR. 


1 


1 


3 





4 


1 








4 


14 


CHRISTOPHER J DODD 

















1 











1 


MIKE GRAVEL 

















1 








1 


2 


BARACK OBAMA 


455 


298 


403 


314 


350 


337 


334 


423 


355 


3269 


DENNIS J KUCINICH 


1 


1 


1 


2 


4 


2 


1 





2 


14 


BILL RICHARDSON 


2 


1 


2 


1 





1 











7 


NO PREF 


3 


3 


1 


4 


3 


2 


2 


4 


2 


24 


Blanks 


1 


1 


2 


1 








1 


2 


1 


9 


Misc. Others 


2 








1 


4 














7 


Totals 


793 


684 


829 


625 


723 


697 


731 


747 


739 


6568 


STATE COMMITTEE MAN 






















WILSON G. DELOSSANTOS 


1 


3 


6 


1 


1 





2 


5 


7 


26 


Blanks 


780 


667 


814 


616 


717 


679 


723 


729 


718 


6443 


Misc. Others 


12 


14 


9 


8 


5 


18 


6 


13 


14 


99 


Totals 


792 


681 


823 


624 


722 


697 


729 


742 


732 


6568 


STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 






















NANCY STOLBERG 


464 


388 


485 


339 


410 


373 


398 


421 


416 


3694 


Blanks 


329 


294 


344 


285 


312 


324 


332 


325 


322 


2867 


Misc. Others 





2 





1 


1 





1 


1 


1 


7 


Totals 


793 


684 


829 


625 


723 


697 


731 


747 


739 


6568 


TOWN COMMITTEE 






















DEMOCRATIC GROUP 






















GROUP 1 


302 


235 


297 


230 


233 


242 


264 


284 


252 


2339 


Blanks 


491 


449 


532 


395 


490 


455 


467 


463 


487 


4229 


Totals 


793 


684 


829 


625 


723 


697 


731 


747 


739 


6568 


DONALD MILLER 


319 


255 


314 


242 


293 


260 


291 


306 


272 


2552 


PAUL STOLBERG 


359 


261 


352 


248 


259 


262 


291 


317 


276 


2625 


MARGARET O'CONNOR 


340 


275 


331 


244 


264 


267 


285 


310 


288 


2604 


NANCY STOLBERG 


381 


276 


367 


259 


283 


269 


299 


330 


285 


2749 


FRANCIS O'CONNOR 


323 


263 


328 


245 


257 


259 


278 


308 


276 


2537 


PATRICIA COMMANE 


322 


250 


310 


235 


246 


258 


273 


298 


269 


2461 


ANNETTE SILVA-GRAMS 


322 


255 


315 


239 


248 


257 


275 


295 


273 


2479 


THOMAS FEDAK 


313 


238 


302 


237 


239 


248 


268 


289 


262 


2396 


PAUL NORDONE 


327 


259 


324 


252 


312 


278 


289 


301 


274 


2616 


ALISON ATWOOD 


331 


252 


321 


239 


255 


255 


272 


299 


271 


2495 


GALE ROSS 


320 


242 


322 


240 


248 


253 


274 


295 


269 


2463 


GERALD GUSTUS 


327 


248 


325 


241 


250 


263 


301 


308 


278 


2541 


SONDRA FINEGOLD 


362 


297 


368 


283 


318 


308 


335 


362 


316 


2949 


JOHN ZIPETO 


330 


279 


326 


246 


256 


258 


288 


308 


276 


2567 


MICHAEL FRISHMAN 


356 


273 


351 


261 


271 


268 


300 


332 


288 


2700 


M. KELVIE LYMAN 


372 


262 


355 


256 


291 


272 


311 


332 


300 


2751 


BARBARA ITTALIEN 


476 


325 


425 


305 


350 


339 


409 


463 


354 


3446 


VINOD BHANDARI 


307 


246 


305 


237 


251 


251 


273 


297 


259 


2426 


peter McCarthy 


324 


265 


315 


247 


262 


260 


281 


299 


277 


2530 


SHIRLEY KOUNTZE 


318 


245 


313 


238 


246 


255 


271 


301 


262 


2449 


ROBERT WILLARD 


313 


239 


305 


233 


242 


260 


276 


294 


266 


2428 



199 





PCT1 


PCT2 


PCT3 


PCT4 


PCT 5 PCT 6 


PCT 7 


PCT 8 


PCT 9 


Totals 


NORMA VILLARREAL 


352 


253 


335 


248 


290 


283 


335 


322 


285 


2703 


FRANK SERNA 


326 


243 


314 


236 


256 


268 


298 


301 


268 


2510 


MARYJANE BAUSEMER 


317 


259 


312 


238 


251 


255 


273 


302 


266 


2473 


MATTHEW BAUSEMER 


315 


251 


310 


239 


245 


245 


271 


296 


264 


2436 


BARRY FINEGOLD 


445 


363 


467 


352 


396 


385 


425 


439 


396 


3668 


BARBARA WOOTEN 


322 


250 


316 


245 


258 


252 


279 


293 


272 


2487 


LAWRENCE MORSE 


318 


245 


310 


238 


247 


251 


272 


304 


267 


2452 


JAMES CUTICCHIA 


323 


248 


321 


262 


261 


258 


281 


302 


276 


2532 


ANTHONY STANKIEWICZ 


316 


254 


311 


238 


242 


261 


272 


295 


267 


2456 


RINEHART-STANKIEWICZ 


319 


252 


308 


237 


255 


262 


274 


293 


272 


2472 


ELLEN TOWNSON 


317 


245 


313 


238 


250 


257 


277 


292 


265 


2454 


MARK BARTNER 


310 


241 


305 


240 


255 


249 


270 


290 


259 


2419 


KATHLEEN O'CONNOR 


336 


266 


342 


246 


271 


266 


287 


309 


282 


2605 


CARL BYERS 


335 


262 


325 


246 


263 


267 


295 


323 


277 


2593 


Blanks 


15962 


14768 


17452 


13145 


15924 


15036 


15301 


15140 


16058 


138786 


Misc. Others 
































Totals 


27755 


23905 


29015 


21875 


25305 


24395 


25550 


26145 


25865 


229810 


ELECTION RESULTS FOR REPUBLICAN PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY ANDOVER MA 02/05/2008 






PCT1 


PCT2 


PCT3 


PCT4 


PCT 5 PCT 6 


PCT 7 


PCT 8 


PCT 9 


Totals 


PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 




















JOHN McCAIN 


139 


144 


164 


166 


167 


172 


164 


192 


161 


1469 


FRED THOMPSON 








1 


1 


1 














3 


TOM TANCREDO 








2 




















2 


DUNCAN HUNTER 
































MIKE HUCKABEE 


6 


9 


7 


6 


15 


11 


12 


9 


9 


84 


MITT ROMNEY 


211 


299 


277 


257 


272 


283 


253 


317 


298 


2467 


RON PAUL 


12 


7 


9 


5 


8 


8 


16 


9 


5 


79 


RUDY GIULIANI 


4 


2 





3 


2 








3 


2 


16 


NO PREF 





3 


1 

















1 


5 


Blanks 





2 





1 

















2 


Misc. Others 





























1 


Totals 


372 


466 


461 


439 


465 


474 


445 


530 


476 


4128 


STATE COMMITTEE MAN 






















JARED P. ADAMS 


1 


2 


2 


2 


6 


7 





1 


4 


25 


Blanks 


369 


453 


455 


433 


456 


465 


438 


524 


464 


4057 


Misc. Others 


2 


11 


4 


4 


3 


2 


7 


5 


8 


46 


Totals 


372 


466 


461 


439 


465 


474 


445 


530 


476 


4128 


STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 




















Blanks 


371 


462 


460 


436 


461 


472 


442 


526 


473 


4103 


Misc. Others 


1 


4 


1 


3 


4 


2 


3 


4 


3 


25 


Totals 


372 


466 


461 


439 


465 


474 


445 


530 


476 


4128 



200 





PCT1 


PCT2 


PCT3 


PCT4 


PCT 5 PCT 6 


PCT 7 


PCT 8 


PCT 9 


Totals 


TOWN COMMITTEE 






















REPUBLICAN GROUP 






















GROUP 1 


120 


141 


144 


142 


164 


150 


149 


184 


179 


1373 


Blanks 


252 


325 


317 


297 


301 


324 


296 


346 


297 


2755 


Totals 


372 


466 


461 


439 


465 


474 


445 


530 


476 


4128 


JOHN MOFhl 1 1 


142 


164 


167 


176 


186 


179 


166 


210 


198 


1588 


DONALD ELLSWORTH 


130 


167 


158 


156 


171 


165 


154 


193 


196 


1490 


WILLIAM HICKEY, JR 


134 


155 


156 


153 


173 


166 


160 


196 


201 


1494 


CHRISTINE HOLMES 


134 


154 


152 


151 


172 


158 


154 


195 


199 


1469 


PETER COTCH 


132 


148 


150 


148 


166 


157 


154 


205 


186 


1446 


DEBORAH CHARLEBOIS 


135 


162 


152 


170 


190 


167 


165 


197 


194 


1532 


JOSEPH DADIEGO 


130 


153 


150 


146 


166 


155 


155 


188 


184 


1427 


SAUM TABIT 


127 


153 


151 


152 


169 


161 


155 


194 


189 


1451 


CALVIN DEYERMOND 


142 


167 


181 


165 


175 


168 


162 


212 


198 


1570 


EUGENIE MOFH 1 1 


139 


161 


157 


170 


180 


170 


163 


199 


191 


1530 


GARY COON 


158 


167 


173 


170 


191 


174 


176 


228 


209 


1646 


ANNALEE ABELSON 


130 


157 


151 


149 


168 


155 


155 


193 


193 


1451 


ANDREW BOTTI 


138 


154 


155 


146 


170 


156 


157 


192 


188 


1456 


PAUL TWOMEY 


155 


178 


176 


165 


190 


172 


172 


215 


197 


1620 


C. MALONEY-BENEDIX 


126 


147 


149 


151 


180 


176 


158 


194 


190 


1471 


F. LIVINGSTONE, JR 


125 


160 


152 


158 


170 


174 


154 


192 


196 


1481 


LISA DONA 


127 


154 


154 


161 


186 


162 


163 


192 


188 


1487 


DONA KWOLYK 


139 


147 


155 


146 


169 


154 


156 


188 


186 


1440 


JOSEPHINE RAYE 


124 


150 


147 


144 


167 


154 


153 


187 


186 


1412 


KEVIN BENEDIX 


125 


151 


150 


149 


178 


171 


161 


199 


192 


1476 


JARED ADAMS 


124 


146 


146 


146 


177 


152 


153 


185 


188 


1417 


STEPHEN STAPINSKI 


142 


162 


154 


166 


192 


178 


173 


205 


205 


1577 


BRIAN MAJOR 


154 


185 


190 


187 


210 


203 


213 


241 


228 


1811 


JAMES LYONS, JR 


125 


154 


155 


149 


173 


158 


166 


194 


189 


1463 


MICHAEL TORRISI 


138 


176 


181 


169 


196 


177 


169 


210 


200 


1616 


BRANDON BIGELOW 


133 


149 


157 


148 


167 


156 


153 


187 


188 


1438 


DAVID GILKIE 


125 


150 


152 


151 


170 


155 


155 


187 


189 


1434 


ELIZABETH MOFH 1 1 


135 


170 


160 


168 


188 


172 


168 


205 


199 


1565 


STEPHEN CIRBEE 


125 


165 


155 


156 


177 


165 


153 


190 


193 


1479 


Blanks 


9125 


11693 


11542 


10793 


11106 


11770 


10879 


12772 


11018 


100698 


Misc. Others 


2 


11 


7 


6 


2 


10 





5 


2 


45 


Totals 


13020 


16310 


16135 


15365 


16275 


16590 


15575 


18550 


16660 


144480 



201 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR GREEN-RAINBOW PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY ANDOVER MA 02/05/2008 



PCT1 


PCT2 


PCT3 


PCT4 


PCT 5 PCT 6 


PCT 7 


PCT 8 


PCT 9 


Totals 


PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 






















RALPH NADER 


2 








2 

















4 


ELAINE BROWN 
































KAT SWIFT 
































CYNTHIA McKINNEY 





1 























1 


KENT MESPLAY 
































NO PREF 





1 























1 


Blanks 
































Misc. Others 





1 























1 


Totals 


2 


3 





2 

















7 


STATE COMMITTEE MAN 






















Blanks 


2 


3 





2 

















7 


Misc. Others 
































Totals 


2 


3 





2 

















7 


STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 






















Blanks 


2 


3 





2 

















7 


Misc. Others 
































Totals 


2 


3 





2 

















7 


TOWN COMMITTEE 






















Blanks 


20 


30 





20 

















70 


Misc. Others 
































Totals 


20 


30 





20 

















70 


ELECTION RESULTS FOR WORKING FAMILIES PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY i 


tVNDOVER MA 02/05/2008 


PCT1 


PCT2 


PCT3 


PCT4 


PCT 5 PCT 6 


PCT 7 


PCT 8 


PCT 9 


Totals 


PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 






















NO PREF 
































Blanks 














1 














1 


Misc. Others 
































Totals 














1 














1 


STATE COMMITTEE MAN 






















Blanks 














1 














1 


Misc. Others 
































Totals 














1 














1 


STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 






















Blanks 














1 














1 


Misc. Others 
































Totals 














1 














1 


TOWN COMMITTEE 






















Blanks 














10 














10 


Misc. Others 
































Totals 














10 














10 



202 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 3/25/2008 
PCT. 1 PCT. 2 PCT. 3 PCT. 4 PCT. 5 PCT. 6 PCT. 7 PCT. 8 PCT. 9 Totals 



MODERATOR (1) 






















SHEILA M DOHERTY 


250 


226 


254 


219 


177 


207 


192 


302 


266 


2093 


Blanks 


79 


54 


80 


64 


54 


59 


64 


94 


84 


632 


Misc. Others 


11 


2 


6 


5 


5 


4 


1 


8 


4 


46 


Totals 


340 


282 


340 


288 


236 


270 


257 


404 


354 


2771 


BD. OF SELECTMEN (1) 






















MARY KELVIE LYMAN 


201 


151 


186 


122 


106 


140 


134 


222 


184 


1446 


PETER J COTCH 


114 


118 


140 


155 


118 


116 


110 


167 


150 


1188 


Blanks 


24 


13 


14 


11 


12 


14 


12 


14 


20 


134 


Misc. Others 


1 

















1 


1 





3 


Totals 


340 


282 


340 


288 


236 


270 


257 


404 


354 


2771 


SCHOOL COMM. (1) 






















DENNIS F FORGUE 


151 


137 


190 


130 


108 


114 


88 


201 


173 


1292 


GREGORY J RIGBY 


121 


102 


109 


118 


87 


119 


139 


151 


123 


1069 


Blanks 


67 


42 


39 


38 


40 


37 


29 


51 


57 


400 


Misc. Others 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 





1 


1 


1 


10 


Totals 


340 


282 


340 


288 


236 


270 


257 


404 


354 


2771 


HOUSING AUTH. (1) 






















JANICE BURKHOLDER 


244 


195 


258 


189 


160 


197 


167 


277 


245 


1932 


Blanks 


94 


84 


80 


97 


73 


72 


88 


125 


109 


822 


Misc. Others 


2 


3 


2 


2 


3 


1 


2 


2 





17 


Totals 


340 


282 


340 


288 


236 


270 


257 


404 


354 


2771 


BALLOT QUESTION 






















YES 


181 


128 


148 


107 


98 


107 


106 


192 


141 


1208 


NO 


151 


148 


187 


175 


138 


158 


146 


207 


210 


1520 


Blanks 


8 


6 


5 


6 





5 


5 


5 


3 


43 


Totals 


340 


282 


340 


288 


236 


270 


257 


404 


354 


2771 



203 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR STATE PRIMARY 



ANDOVER MA 09/16/2008 



DEMOCRAT 





PREC 1 PREC 2 


PREC 3 


PREC 4 


PREC 5 


PREC 6 


PREC 7 


PREC 8 


PREC 9 


TOTAL! 


SENATOR IN CONGRESS 






















JOHN F KERRY 


216 


153 


169 


114 


117 


123 


153 


171 


144 


1360 


EDWARD J O'REILLY 


73 


79 


87 


64 


67 


76 


62 


83 


69 


660 


Blanks 


4 


3 


1 








1 


1 








10 


Misc. Others 














1 


1 











2 


Totals 


293 


235 


257 


178 


185 


201 


216 


254 


213 


2032 


REP. IN CONGRESS 






















NICOLA S TSONGAS 


239 


184 


191 


131 


135 


145 


168 


194 


170 


1557 


BARRY R FINEGOLD 


1 


1 


1 














1 


1 


5 


Blanks 


51 


49 


63 


45 


47 


55 


47 


55 


42 


454 


Misc. Others 


2 


1 


2 


2 


3 


1 


1 


4 





16 


Totals 


293 


235 


257 


178 


185 


201 


216 


254 


213 


2032 


COUNCILLOR 






















MARY-ELLEN MANNING 


142 


126 


112 


82 


89 


101 


115 


113 


101 


981 


TIMOTHY P HOUTEN 


73 


55 


61 


46 


54 


49 


39 


71 


55 


503 


Blanks 


78 


54 


82 


50 


41 


51 


62 


69 


57 


544 


Misc. Others 








2 





1 








1 





4 


Totals 


293 


235 


257 


178 


185 


201 


216 


254 


213 


2032 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 




















SUSAN C TUCKER 


257 


191 


201 


133 


143 


158 


177 


209 


176 


1645 


Blanks 


36 


43 


55 


41 


41 


42 


37 


44 


36 


375 


Misc. Others 





1 


1 


4 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


12 


Totals 


293 


235 


257 


178 


185 


201 


216 


254 


213 


2032 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT (18th Dist.) 




















BARBARA A LTTALIEN 


243 

















165 


201 





609 


Blanks 


50 

















49 


51 





150 


Misc. Others 




















2 


2 





4 


Totals 


293 

















216 


254 





763 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT (17th Dist.) 




















BARRY R FINEGOLD 





174 


180 


136 


138 


151 








164 


943 


Blanks 





59 


76 


38 


46 


49 








48 


316 


Misc. Others 





2 


1 


4 


1 


1 








1 


10 


Totals 





235 


257 


178 


185 


201 








213 


1269 


REGISTER OF PROBATE 






















PAMELA CASEY O'BRIEN 


197 


162 


159 


108 


124 


126 


152 


166 


151 


1345 


Blanks 


96 


73 


97 


70 


60 


74 


64 


88 


62 


684 


Misc. Others 








1 





1 


1 











3 


Total 


293 


235 


257 


178 


185 


201 


216 


254 


213 


2032 


REPUBLICAN 
























PREC1 1 


PREC 2 


PREC 3 


PREC 4 


PREC 5 


PREC 6 


PREC 7 


PREC 8 


PREC 9 


TOTAL 


SENATOR IN CONGRESS 






















JEFFREY K BEATTY 


43 


28 


28 


18 


22 


15 


27 


26 


32 


239 


Blanks 


2 


2 


1 











4 





1 


10 


Misc. Others 





3 





1 


1 





1 





1 


7 


Totals 


45 


33 


29 


19 


23 


15 


32 


26 


34 


256 


REP. IN CONGRESS 






















THEODORE GAIERO 








1 


1 


1 


1 





1 





5 


Blanks 


45 


33 


28 


18 


21 


11 


31 


25 


32 


244 


Misc. Others 














1 


3 


1 





2 


7 


Totals 


45 


33 


29 


19 


23 


15 


32 


26 


34 


256 


COUNCILLOR 






















Blanks 


45 


33 


28 


2Q# 


22 


13 


32 


26 


33 


251 


Misc. Others 








1 


1 


2 








1 


5 


Totals 


45 


33 


29 


19 


23 


15 


32 


26 


34 


256 



(Republican cont...) PF 


LEC 1 P! 


REC2 


PREC 3 


PREC 4 


PREC 5 


PREC 6 


PREC 7 


PREC 8 


PREC 9 


TOTALS 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 






















Blanks 


45 


33 


29 


19 


23 


13 


32 


25 


33 


252 


Misc. Others 

















2 





1 


1 


4 


Totals 


45 


33 


29 


19 


23 


15 


32 


26 


34 


256 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT (18th Dist.) 




















LAWRENCE BRENNAN 


44 

















24 


25 





93 


Blanks 


1 

















8 


1 





10 


Misc. Others 
































Totals 


45 

















32 


26 





103 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT (17th Dist.) 




















Blanks 





33 


29 


19 


23 


13 








33 


150 


Misc. Others 

















2 








1 


3 


Totals 





33 


29 


19 


23 


15 








34 


153 


REGISTER OF PROBATE 






















Blanks 


45 


33 


29 


19 


23 


13 


32 


26 


33 


253 


Misc. Others 

















2 








1 


3 


Totals 


45 


33 


29 


19 


23 


15 


32 


26 


34 


256 


GREEN-RAINBOW 






















PREC 1 PREC 2 


PREC 3 


PREC 4 


PREC 5 


PREC 6 


PREC 7 


PREC 8 


PREC 9 


TOTALS 


SENATOR IN CONGRESS 






















Blanks 
































Misc. Others 
































Totals 
































REP. IN CONGRESS 






















Blanks 
































Misc. Others 
































Totals 
































COUNCILLOR 






















Blanks 
































Misc. Others 
































Totals 
































SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 






















Blanks 
































Misc. Others 
































Totals 
































REP. IN GENERAL COURT (18th Dist.) 




















Blanks 


























Misc. Others 


























Totals 


























REP. IN GENERAL COURT (17th Dist.) 




















Blanks 





























Misc. Others 





























Totals 





























REGISTER OF PROBATE 






















Blanks 
































Misc. Others 
































Totals 

































205 



WORKING FAMILIES 





PRECl PREC2 


PREC3 


PREC4 


PREC5 


PREC6 


PREC7 


PREC8 


PREC9 


TOTALS 


SENATOR IN CONGRESS 






















Blanks 
































Misc. Others 
































Totals 
































REP. IN CONGRESS 






















Blanks 
































Misc. Others 
































Totals 
































COUNCILLOR 






















Blanks 
































Misc. Others 
































Totals 
































SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 




















Blanks 
































Misc. Others 
































Totals 
































REP. IN GENERAL COURT (18th Dist.) 




















Blanks 


























Misc. Others 


























Totals 


























REP. IN GENERAL COURT (17th Dist.) 




















Blanks 





























Misc. Others 





























Totals 





























REGISTER OF PROBATE 






















Blanks 
































Misc. Others 
































Totals 

































206 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR GENERAL ELECTION 

Prec 1 Prec 2 Prec 3 
PRESIDENT & VICE-PRESIDENT 



ANDOVER MA 11/04/2008 
Prec 4 Prec 5 Prec 6 Prec 7 Prec 8 Prec 9 



Totals 



BALDWIN & CASTLE 


1 


1 


2 


1 


2 


2 


2 


1 





12 


BARR & ROOT 


10 


8 


9 


3 


10 


16 


16 


8 


8 


88 


MCCAIN & PALIN 


711 


848 


824 


828 


904 


944 


911 


947 


881 


7798 


MCKINNEY & CLEMENTE 


1 


4 


4 


3 


4 


2 


5 


1 


6 


30 


NADER & GONZALEZ 


12 


18 


14 


11 


15 


10 


15 


12 


20 


127 


OBAMA & BIDEN 


1242 


1075 


1280 


1020 


1075 


1041 


1107 


1190 


1147 


10177 


*H. CLINTON 


3 


2 


3 


4 


3 


1 


6 


4 





26 


Blanks 


3 


7 


5 


8 


4 


5 


7 


6 


8 


53 


Misc. Others 


3 


2 


4 


3 


7 


1 


2 


6 


5 


33 


Totals 


1986 


1965 


2145 


1881 


2024 


2022 


2071 


2175 


2075 


18344 


SENATOR IN CONGRESS 






















JOHN F KERRY 


1224 


1082 


1290 


1048 


1101 


1074 


1154 


1186 


1157 


10316 


JEFFREY K BEATTY 


664 


779 


736 


729 


804 


834 


810 


882 


828 


7066 


ROBERT J UNDERWOOD 


50 


48 


45 


45 


63 


47 


42 


45 


39 


424 


Blanks 


47 


54 


72 


58 


54 


63 


64 


59 


50 


521 


Misc. Others 


1 


2 


2 


1 


2 


4 


1 


3 


1 


17 


Totals 


1986 


1965 


2145 


1881 


2024 


2022 


2071 


2175 


2075 


18344 


REP. IN CONGRESS 






















NICOLA S TSONGAS 


1474 


1438 


1582 


1353 


1469 


1397 


1488 


1532 


1500 


13233 


*OGONOWSKI 





3 











2 


4 


2 


3 


14 


Blanks 


498 


510 


531 


511 


527 


589 


550 


607 


546 


4869 


Misc. Others 


14 


14 


32 


17 


28 


34 


29 


34 


26 


228 


Totals 


1986 


1965 


2145 


1881 


2024 


2022 


2071 


2175 


2075 


18344 


COUNCILLOR 






















MARY-ELLEN MANNING 


1325 


1256 


1363 


1192 


1269 


1233 


1321 


1311 


1297 


11567 


Blanks 


652 


702 


766 


677 


740 


771 


736 


846 


763 


6653 


Misc. Others 


9 


7 


16 


12 


15 


18 


14 


18 


15 


124 


Totals 


1986 


1965 


2145 


1881 


2024 


2022 


2071 


2175 


2075 


18344 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 






















SUSAN C TUCKER 


1511 


1444 


1599 


1355 


1466 


1430 


1503 


1549 


1512 


13369 


Blanks 


466 


516 


530 


514 


542 


568 


552 


605 


541 


4834 


Misc. Others 


9 


5 


16 


12 


16 


24 


16 


21 


22 


141 


Totals 


1986 


1965 


2145 


1881 


2024 


2022 


2071 


2175 


2075 


18344 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT 






















BARBARA A LTTALIEN 


1269 

















1177 


1278 





3724 


LAWRENCE BRENNAN 


589 

















766 


772 





2127 


Blanks 


124 

















127 


125 





376 


Misc. Others 


4 

















1 








5 


Totals 


1986 

















2071 


2175 





6232 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT 






















BARRY R FINEGOLD 





1383 


1523 


1289 


1404 


1392 








1447 


8438 


Blanks 





572 


603 


578 


605 


609 








607 


3574 


Misc. Others 





10 


19 


14 


15 


21 








21 


100 


Totals 





1965 


2145 


1881 


2024 


2022 








2075 


12112 


REGISTER OF PROBATE 






















PAMELA CASEY O'BRIEN 


1294 


1240 


1368 


1188 


1244 


1225 


1300 


1311 


1296 


11466 


Blanks 


684 


718 


766 


686 


768 


778 


759 


848 


761 


6768 


Misc. Others 


8 


7 


11 


7 


12 


19 


12 


16 


18 


110 


Totals 


1986 


1965 


2145 


1881 


2024 


2022 


2071 


2175 


2075 


18344 



207 



Prec 1 Prec 2 Prec 3 Prec 4 Prec 5 Prec 6 Prec 7 Prec 8 Prec 9 Totals 






QUESTION 1 

YES 

NO 

Blanks 
Totals 
QUESTION 2 

YES 

NO 

Blanks 
Totals 
QUESTION 3 

YES 

NO 

Blanks 
Totals 
QUESTION 4 

YES 

NO 

Blanks 
Totals 



636 


730 


683 


696 


722 


720 


758 


774 


771 


6490 


1267 


1166 


1414 


1147 


1258 


1262 


1254 


1338 


1249 


11355 


83 


69 


48 


38 


44 


40 


59 


63 


55 


499 


1986 


1965 


2145 


1881 


2024 


2022 


2071 


2175 


2075 


18344 


1284 


1191 


1379 


1064 


1249 


1249 


1301 


1345 


1254 


11316 


649 


725 


728 


780 


740 


744 


741 


790 


781 


6678 


53 


49 


38 


37 


35 


29 


29 


40 


40 


350 


1986 


1965 


2145 


1881 


2024 


2022 


2071 


2175 


2075 


18344 


1217 


1113 


1305 


1082 


1169 


1109 


1198 


1245 


1208 


10646 


699 


794 


787 


761 


801 


877 


826 


874 


810 


7229 


70 


58 


53 


38 


54 


36 


47 


56 


57 


469 


1986 


1965 


2145 


1881 


2024 


2022 


2071 


2175 


2075 


18344 


882 

















1105 


1024 





3011 


761 

















681 


819 





2261 


343 

















285 


332 





960 


1986 

















2071 


2175 





6232 



208 



* * 



HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 



Mailing Address: Town Offices, 36 Bartlet Street, Andover, MA 01810 
Business Hours at the Town Offices: 



8:30 A.M. -4:30 P.M. Monday - Friday 

(Comm. Dev. & Planning - 8:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M.) 



Telephone Numbers: 



POLICE/FIRE-RESCUE - EMERGENCY 

Fire-Rescue - Business 

Police Department - Business 

Town Manager 

DCS Classes & Activities 

Department of Public Works 

Human Resources Office 

Memorial Hall Library 

Senior Center 

Superintendent of Schools 



911 

978-623-8466 

978-475-0411 

978-623-8225 

978-623-8273/8274 

978-623-8350 

978-623-8530 

978-623-8400 

978-623-8321 

978-623-8501 



Andover's Home Page: http://www.andoverma.gov 

Memorial Hall Library's Home Page: http://www.mhl.org 
Andover's Population: 29,408 



Square Miles: 



32 



Number of Acres: 



19,900 



Town Meeting and Election: 

Voter Registration Information: 
Andover's Tax Rate: 



When are Taxes Due: 



Excise Tax Information: 



2,000+ controlled by the Conservation Commission 

1,200 owned by A. V.I.S. 

889 owned by Commonwealth - Harold Parker State Forest 

Town Election is held the fourth Tuesday of March. 
Annual Town Meeting is generally held four weeks 
following the Town Election. 

Call Town Clerk's Office at 978-623-8255 

$12.16 - Residential and Open Space 

$19.98 - Commercial/Industrial & Personal Property 

Taxes are due quarterly on the following dates: 
August 1 st - November 1 st - February 1 st - May 1 st 



Call the Assessor's Office at 978-623-8264 



209 



Recycling Information: 

Questions: Call the Department of Public Works at 978-623-8350 



Curbside Pick-up: 



Every other week - place curbside by 7:00 A.M. on your pickup 
day. Recyclable material inclusive of glass (all colors, steel & tin 
cans, aluminum containers and #1 through #7 plastics. Recyclable 
paper products include: newspapers, magazines, junk mail, office 
paper, paperboard (cereal & cracker boxes - liners removed) and 
corrugated containers. Cardboard - please break down, flatten and 
fold boxes, cartons & other pieces of cardboard into 2'x2'xl' 
bundles - then tie or tape them together and place next to your bin. 



Complaints/Information: 



Call Integrated Paper Recyclers at 1-800-933-3128 or 

the Department of Public Works at 978-623-8350 or e-mail 

at dpw-businessffiandoverma.gov . 



Compost Site: 



Rubbish Information: 



Curbside Pickup: 



High Plain Road (Bald Hill area). Leaves and grass clippings. 
Clippings must be removed from container used to transport for 
dumping. All contaminated loads will be rejected. Fines will be 
assessed for illegal dumping. Open year round for walk-ins. 
Drive-ins announced in local newspapers and on Town's website. 



Every week - place curbside by 7:00 A.M. on your pickup day. 
Household rubbish is limited to 6 bags or barrels per residence 
(may change in 2009). One bulky item is allowed per week in 
addition to household trash. 



Complaints or Inquiries: 



How to Dispose of an Appliance: 



Call Allied Waste/BFI at 1-800-442-9006 or 

the Department of Public Works at 978-623-8350 or e-mail 

at dp w-business@ando verma. gov . 

Appliances can no longer be left curbside with your trash - 
their disposal is the homeowner's responsibility. 
Suggestions for disposal: hire a private contractor or check 
with the company where your new appliance was 
purchased to see if they will take the old appliance. 



Pothole or Snow Removal Complaint: Call the Highway Division at 978-623-8426 



Pothole Claims: 



Submit a letter to the Town Manager's Office within thirty days of the 
date of the incident or contact the office at 978-623-8225 with any 
questions. 



210 



Where to Inquire About or Obtain Licenses & Permits: 

Ballfield Permits & Rentals Facilities Coordinator 



Birth Certificate 



Town Clerk's Office 



978-623-8450 



978-623-8255 



Building Permits Building Division 978-623-8301 

(construction, plumbing, gas, electrical) (Office Hours: 8:00 A.M. - 10:00 A.M.) 



Business Certificate 

Death Certificate 

Dog License 

Fields Rental 

Fishing & Hunting License 

Food Service License 

Liquor License (Annual or One-Day) 

Marriage License 

Open Air Burning Permit 

Passports 

Smoke Detector Permit 

Street Opening Permit 
The Park Rental 
Town House Rental 
Zoning Bylaw Variance 



Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Facilities Coordinator 

Town Clerk's Office 

Health Division 

and/or 

Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Fire Department 

Town Clerk's Office 
Fire Department 

Dept. of Public Works 

Town Manager's Office 

Facilities Coordinator 

Building Division 

and/or 

Board of Appeals Office 



978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8450 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8295 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8307 
or 8343 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8307 
or 8343 

978-623-8350 

978-623-8225 

978-623-8450 

978-623-8301 

978-623-8315 



211 



HOW TO REACH YOUR FEDERAL & STATE ELECTED OFFICIALS 



United States Senators: 

The Honorable Edward M. Kennedy (D) 

2400 John F. Kennedy Federal Building, Boston, MA 02203 

617-565-3170 

315 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510 

202-224-4543 

senator(g)kennedv.senate.gov 

The Honorable John F. Kerry (D) 

One Bowdoin Square, 10 th Floor, Boston, MA 021 14 

617-565-8519 

362 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510 

202-224-2742 

john kerryffl)kerry. senate.com 

United States Representative: 

The Honorable Niki S. Tsongas (D) 

Fifth Congressional District 

1 1 Kearney Square, Lowell, MA 01852 

978-459-0101 

2229 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, DC 205 1 5 

202-225-3411 

askniki(g) mail.house.gov 

State Senator: 

Susan C. Tucker (D) 

Second Essex & Middlesex District 

State House, Room 424, Boston, MA 02133 

617-722-1612 

stucker@senate.state.ma.us 

State Representatives: 

Barry R. Finegold (D) 

Seventeenth Essex District (Andover Precincts 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 & 9) 

State House, Room 275, Boston, MA 02 1 33 

617-722-2396 

rep.ban7f1negold@hou.state.ma.us 

Barbara A. LTtalien (D) 

Eighteenth Essex District (Andover Precincts 1 , 7 & 8) 

State House, Room 23 8, Boston, MA 02 1 33 

617-722-2380 

rep.barbararitalien@hou.state.ma.us 

212 



HOW TO REACH YOUR LOCAL ELECTED OFFICIALS 



Board of Selectmen: 



Ted E. Teichert 
5 Dufton Road 
978-475-1087 
tteichert@comcast.net 

Alex J. Vispoli 

7 Alison Way 
978-475-7661 
avispoli@coiTicast.net 

Mary K. Lyman 
50 School Street 
978-470-2685 
iameslyman82(o),hotrnail.coin 

Gerald Stabile, Jr. 

8 Blueberry Hill Road 
978-475-6060 
istabileir@coincast.net 

Brian P. Major 
1 1 Odyssey Way 
978-470-3428 " 
bmmajor@coiTicast.com 



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